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Old 06-20-2005, 09:54 AM   #1
Troy Archie
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4088824.stm

I'm curious as to what others think about this. I have 4 blocks (112 grams) of beef a day and I'm sure there's plenty of others who eat beef on a daily basis. Beef always seems to get bad press and is reccomend in small amounts but is there any real legimental support to any these fears?
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Old 06-20-2005, 10:39 AM   #2
Scott Kustes
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There were two findings in the study: red meat increases cancer risk and low fiber diet increases cancer risk. I wonder how closely those two are associated - that being, I wonder how many people that eat large quantities of red meat also eat a low fiber diet (the proverbial "meat and potatoes" people). That's not to say that there's no merit to the beef thing (I really don't know). But I do know that meat has been eaten for millenia (paleo diet) and as far as I know, there's no real evidence of bowel cancer in those people.

Basically, I'd like to know how they controlled for other parts of a person's diet to establish that the red meat was causing his/her higher risk rather than low fiber or some other component of lifestyle.
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Old 06-20-2005, 04:18 PM   #3
Pat Janes
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That's the problem with all of these kinds of "studies"; they are correlative, not causal.

Too many unaccounted variables. It seems, the more we learn about the human body, the less we "know".

It's one of the reasons why I like the premise of the paleo diet (and no, I'm not strictly paleo). It is, irrevocably, the diet for which our human genome has evolved to require. It's as close to a "proof" as you're likely to get (arguments regarding applicability to the current food supply etc not-withstanding).
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Old 06-20-2005, 07:03 PM   #4
Hone Watson
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Eat organic grass fed beef. Game meats are also better. Why? Because the fat profiles are drastically different. Much less fat overall, far higher omega 3's, far less saturated.
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Old 06-20-2005, 07:27 PM   #5
Pat Janes
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I know I should be looking into eating roo meat, for those reasons, Hone. We buy all our groceries including meat from the supermarket (eg. Woolworths or equivalent) and they don't do roo and/or organic stuff; at least not the one near us.

Might have to start shopping at the butcher...
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Old 06-21-2005, 04:59 AM   #6
Larry Lindenman
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Just read a study today which correlated drinking 2 or more DIET sodas with an over 50% risk of obesity, more than the risk of regular soda. Is it the diet soda making these people obese (Robb Wolf believes it's a factor)? But in general, it's all the other factors that go with a lifestyle which includes diet soda consumption: "Give me a Big Mac, super size the fries, apple pie, oh ya...and a diet Coke, extra large please!" There is an issue with the fat profiles of grain fed red meat, but not enough to force me to pay double for free range omega meat.
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Old 06-21-2005, 10:42 AM   #7
Ron Nelson
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"There are three kinds of liars: Liars, damn liars, and statisicians!"
-Mark Twain
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Old 06-21-2005, 03:06 PM   #8
Jeremy Jones
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Belonging to a hunter family, I am definately going to be hitting up all my uncles for more deer/elk/bear meat.

I might even go out for a hunt or two (something I haven't done since I was a young teen). I have to confess, I never have harvested a deer. It might be a good workout (having to carry it back to camp).



I would like to point out that this is not due to the article above. I just get the feeling that the variety would do my diet good. Chicken, tuna and salmon get old for me.
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Old 06-21-2005, 05:57 PM   #9
Hone Watson
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Pat,

One thing I've noticed about Roo meat is that it goes off quickly - not to sure why?

Its best to eat it right away once opened.

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Old 06-21-2005, 06:04 PM   #10
Hone Watson
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Larry,

I have read similar studies regarding diet sodas. Paul Chek also believes its a factor.

As for standard commercial practices you might like to consider the following:

"Some feedlots have begun research trials adding cardboard, newspaper, and sawdust to the feeding programs to reduce costs. Other factory farms scrape up the manure from chicken houses and pigpens, adding it directly to cattle feed. Cement dust may become a particularly attractive feed supplement in the future, according to the United States Department of Agriculture, because it produces a 30 percent faster weight gain than cattle on only regular feed. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials say that it's not uncommon for some feedlot operators to mix industrial sewage and oils into the feed to reduce costs and fatten animals more quickly.

"At Kansas State University, scientists have experimented with plastic feed, small pellets containing 80 to 90 percent ethylene and 10 to 20 percent propylene, as an artificial form of cheap roughage to feed cattle. Researchers point to the extra savings of using the new plastic feed at slaughter time when upward of '20 pounds of the stuff from each cow's rumen can be recovered, melt[ed] down and recycle[d] into new pellets.' The new pellets are much cheaper than hay and can provide roughage requirements at a significant savings."

(from Jeremy Rifkin's "Beyond Beef")

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