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Equipment Outfitting a serious gym. Vendors & suppliers. Devices & equipment

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Old 06-01-2006, 12:27 PM   #1
Pierre Auge
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I've been looking at getting a new bike for sometime. And though I wont be able to afford the measly $610.00 Canadian + shipping it will cost. I have found myself a beauty. This sexy single speed will make getting around town suck so much with all of the hills, that it will be awesome!

http://www.bianchiusa.com/06_pista.html

Someday baby you'll be mine!!! Thats a pretty reasonable cost for a top quality bike.
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Old 06-01-2006, 01:03 PM   #2
Eugene R. Allen
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Pierre - you do know that this is a track bike and as such has no brakes...right? You will not want to be on the road with this without putting some brakes on it and I'm not sure it make sense to modify a track bike like that rather than just getting a normally set up road bike.
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Old 06-01-2006, 01:40 PM   #3
Pierre Auge
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Eugene,
Thats a nice little oversight of mine! I was aware that its a track bike. Laurentian U where I will be attending school in the fall has an indoor sloped track which is why I was looking at it. What I failed to notice was that those track bikes don't have breaks. That wouldn't have been cool, sure reduces some of its usefulness. But in no way affects the fact that its a track bike I can afford. I guess my plan to convert a standard road bike to single speed is still my best bet for getting around town by the hardest means possible.
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Old 06-01-2006, 01:41 PM   #4
Pierre Auge
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Thanks again Eugene!
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Old 06-01-2006, 02:37 PM   #5
Don Stevenson
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Not only does a track bike have no brakes but it is also a fixed wheel which means that when you stop pedaling the cranks keep turning.

Track bikes are definitely not a good choice for commuting.

I'd say your best bet is to find a second hand road bike like a giant OCR and make it single speed. Ebay abounds with bargain bike bits and I reckon for half that money you could put something together.

If you want to train for track thats another matter, my girlfriend races track and it's an awesome sport.
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Old 06-01-2006, 02:38 PM   #6
Garrett Smith
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Pierre,
Check this out:
http://www.vandesselsports.com/crb.php?bike=9

Info on fixed-gears and conversions:
http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html

I bought an old used Cannondale for $150 and converted it (thanks to a local bikeshop guy) with about $200 worth of parts and labor. I've never been happier.

If you wish to make your own "from scratch", I highly suggest trying to buy a frame/bike that already has the horizontal rear dropouts. My Cannondale did not--thanks to the Sheldon Brown website and some minor filing to deepen my 45-degree dropouts, it thankfully worked out okay. The last bikeshop guy who serviced my bike would have liked to have seen a tiny bit more tension in my chain, it has ridden just fine (up big hills with a lot of tension) for a long time that way and the work to fix it is just too much effort and may screw things up more. FYI.

One thing I did with the bike to both make it have less flat tires and add to the ride exertion was:
1) Heavy-duty Specialized Armadillo tires
2) Mr. Tuffy Tire Liners between the tire and the tube
3) Extra-thick inner tubes
Lots of extra "unsprung" weight, I'm not in any races though...

Knock on wood, no flats yet. I don't expect any either.
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Old 06-01-2006, 03:22 PM   #7
Pierre Auge
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Thanks Garrett awesome info and that Van Dessel is very nice though a bit pricey for me right now. I'm deffinately going to check all that out and do some more research, cool stuff.

Yeah Don I'd still like to have a half decent bike for the track. Now that I'll be in an area where I'll have the opportunity to train this way I want to take advantage of it! If you or your girlfriend have any more suggestions on this please share, anything new I can learn would be quite welcome.

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Old 06-02-2006, 07:32 AM   #8
Jeff Wright
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I know a few people that own a Pista, and it is pre-drilled for a front brake, so you could easily have your shop add one. You could also replace the rear cog with a freewheel to make it a singlespeed.

Another good option might be the Bianchi San Jose, which is a single speed and has a lower gear ratio than the Pista. It also has clearance to mount fenders if you plan to use it as a commuter.

Check out bikeforums.net for more than you were ever afraid to ask about bikes.
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Old 06-02-2006, 10:07 AM   #9
Pierre Auge
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Thanks Jeff thats some good info! I'm deffinately going to look into that and see if its a viable option!
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Old 06-02-2006, 12:31 PM   #10
Robert Thompson
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If you have a track to ride on, then get the track bike. The geometry of the frame (head / seat angle and bottom bracket clearance) will make a difference riding on the track. The steeper angles make a bike that will be VERY responsive to any lean/turn. The bottom bracket clearance allows for steep upswings in the middle of the banked turn without bangin' a pedal, which is also helpful when riding on the road and pedalling through a turn.

As was previously stated, many track bikes come with an option of placing a front brake if you want to ride it on the road. One brake is enough and you'll be surprised how fast you can slow down by applying back pressure to the pedals on a fixed gear.

Other than a front brake, there really isn't any modification one needs to make, other than a particular gear ratio for the local terrain. You may want to select a lower gear for the hills compared to what you would ride on a track.

If you spend a lot of time riding on a track, you might want a set of wheels/tires for that and a set for training (heavier duty) on the road.

Just keep in mind that a track bike is built for SPEED and not long distance rides. The geometry and rigidity of the frame makes if fun for short and fast sprints/races/training, but the comfort of a road bike is not going to be there.





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