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Old 03-04-2006, 02:18 PM   #1
Marc Moffett
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Thought some of you might find this interesting (Hope it formats OK):

Information taken from: Wu, X., G. Beecher, J. Holden, D. Haytowitz, S. Gebhardt, & R. Prior. 2004. Lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidant capacities of common foods in the United States, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 52: 4026-4037.

The total antioxidant capacity (TAC, expressed in umol of TE/g) is the sum of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) from both the lipophilic and hydrophilic elements in the sample.

Fruits

The Big Winners:

Cranberry TAC = 94.56
Blueberry,
**Cultivated TAC = 62.20
**Wild TAC = 92.60
Plums,
**Plums TAC = 62.39
**Black TAC = 73.39
Blackberry TAC = 53.48
Raspberry TAC = 49.25

Solid Showing

Apples,
**red delicious TAC = 42.75
**granny smith TAC = 38.99
**gala TAC = 28.28
**golden delicious TAC = 26.70
**fuji TAC = 25.93
Strawberry TAC = 35.77
Cherries, sweet TAC = 33.61

Another Step Down

Avocado, Haas TAC = 19.33
Pears,
**Green cultivars TAC = 19.11
**Red Anjou TAC = 17.73
Peaches TAC = 18.63
Oranges, navel TAC = 18.41
Tangerines TAC = 16.20
Grapefruit, red TAC = 15.48

The following had TACs less than 15 but greater than 5: apricots, bananas, kiwi, nectarines, pineapples.

The following had TACs less than 5: cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon.

Non-starchy Veggies

The Big Winners

Artichoke, cooked TAC = 94.09
Cabbages
**Red (cooked) TAC = 31.46
**Red (raw) TAC = 22.52
**Common (raw) TAC = 13.59
Asparagus,
**Raw TAC = 30.17
**Cooked TAC = 16.44
Broccoli,
**Raab (raw) TAC = 30.84
**Raab (cooked) TAC = 15.55
**Common (raw) TAC = 15.90
**Common (cooked) TAC = 12.59
Beets, raw TAC = 27.74
Spinach, raw TAC = 26.40
Eggplant, raw TAC = 25.33

Solid Showing

Lettuce,
**Red leaf TAC = 17.85
**Green leaf TAC = 15.50
**Butterhead TAC = 14.24
**Romaine TAC = 9.89
**Iceberg TAC = 4.51
Onions,
**Yellow (cooked) TAC = 12.20
**Yellow (raw) TAC = 10.29
**Red (raw) TAC = 11.46
**Sweet (raw) TAC = 6.15
Carrots,
**Raw TAC = 12.15
**Cooked TAC = 3.71
**Baby (raw) TAC = 4.36

Another Step Down

Peppers,
**Yellow (raw) TAC = 10.24
**Sweet orange (raw) TAC = 9.84
**Sweet red (raw) TAC = 9.01
**Sweet red (cooked) TAC = 8.47
**Sweet green (cooked)TAC = 6.15
**Sweet green (raw) TAC = 5.58
Radishes TAC = 9.54
Cauliflower, raw TAC = 6.47
Celery, raw TAC = 5.74

The following had TACs of less than 5: cucumber, pumpkin (raw), tomatoes (raw/cooked).

Starchy Veggies

Potatoes,
**Russet (cooked) TAC = 15.55
**Russet (raw) TAC = 13.23
**Red (cooked) TAC = 13.26
**Red (raw) TAC = 10.98
**White (cooked) TAC = 10.81
**White (raw) TAC = 10.59
Sweet Potatoes,
**Raw TAC = 9.02
**Cooked TAC = 7.66
Corn,
**Raw TAC = 7.28
**Frozen TAC = 5.22

Legumes

Beans (dry, uncooked),
**Small red TAC = 149.21
**Red kidney TAC = 144.13
**Pinto TAC = 123.59
**Black TAC = 80.40
**Navy TAC = 24.74
Peas,
**Blackeye (dry) TAC = 43.43
**Green (frozen) TAC = 6.00
Peanuts TAC = 31.66
Beans, snap (raw) TAC = 2.67

Nuts

Pecans TAC = 179.40
Walnuts TAC = 135.41
Hazelnuts TAC = 96.45
Pistachios TAC = 79.83
Almonds TAC = 44.54
Cashews TAC = 19.97
Macadamias TAC = 16.95
Brazil nuts TAC = 14.19
Pine Nutes TAC = 7.19

Dried Fruits

Prunes TAC = 85.78
Dates,
**Deglet Noor TAC = 38.95
**Medjool TAC = 23.87
Figs TAC = 33.83
Raisins TAC = 30.37

Spices

Cloves, ground TAC = 3144.46
Cinnamon, ground TAC = 2675.36
Oregano leaf, dried TAC = 2001.29
Turmeric, ground TAC = 1592.77
Baking chocolate TAC = 1039.71
Parsley, dried TAC = 743.49
Basil leaf, dried TAC = 675.53
Curry powder TAC = 485.04
Black pepper,
**Whole TAC = 301.41
**Ground TAC = 250.94
Yellow mustard, ground TAC = 292.57
Ginger, ground TAC = 288.11
Chili Powder TAC = 236.35
Paprika TAC = 179.19
Garlic Powder TAC = 66.66
Onion Powder TAC = 57.35
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Old 03-04-2006, 04:22 PM   #2
Ben Kaminski
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Awesome, this is getting printed and saved in the kitchen. Thanks!
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Old 03-05-2006, 01:17 AM   #3
Chris Forbis
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Woo, this makes me feel even better about supplementing my teaspoon of cinnamon a day (for insuling sensitivity).
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Old 03-05-2006, 09:14 AM   #4
Garrett Smith
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From http://brunswicklabs.com/orac_value.shtml, who just so happens to perform antioxidant testing:

What does the ORAC value tell us?
The ORAC assays are performed in vitro, in the test tube, and therefore do not determine the bioavailability within the body. The high ORAC value indicates that the tested sample possesses a high potency of antioxidant activity chemically.


Same site, http://brunswicklabs.com/overview_antioxidants.shtml:
Antioxidants are highly diverse - in source, effect, and use.

More about ORAC:
http://www.jonbarron.org/newsletters/news040927.htm

Besides my own personal efforts to maximize my food antioxidant amount and diversity, I supplement with whole-food Vitamins C and E, Zyflamend (http://www.new-chapter.com/product/supercritical.lasso?-database=NC_Products&-la yout=Product&-response=%2fproduct%2fproduct.lasso&-recordID=32834&-search ) and what I believe to be an innovative R-alpha lipoic acid product, R-Plus from Geronova Research (http://www.geronova.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=GS&Categor y_Code=RP). This approach covers the big three non-mineral antioxidants (C, E, ALA) and adds ten more herbal-based antioxidants for diversity.
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Old 03-05-2006, 09:30 AM   #5
Marc Moffett
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Garrett,

The caveat about bioavailability is important. A significant example concerns those foods that are high in beta-carotein (e.g., mangos), which (for some reason) don't end up with high ORAC values. However, as a rough guideline ORAC values are informative.

Moreover, there are a number of interesting facts contained in the table. For instance, in some foods the TAC values are not much affected by cooking; in others, they are significantly impacted. In fact, in some foods the TAC value actually increases with cooking.

One of the more interesting things is the comparison of TAC values withina particular group (e.g., the differences in apples, lettuces, etc.).

One point that isn't reflected in the above: almost all of the fruits and veggies have high H-ORAC values and low L-ORAC values. Avocados being the main exception.

(Message edited by marc_m on March 05, 2006)
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Old 03-05-2006, 05:18 PM   #6
Garrett Smith
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One observation from that table that is also interesting to me is how the major nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant) are all pretty lightweight in the ORAC values, only one beating the lowly avocado...and I'd bet that the eggplant's value goes down even further after cooking!
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Old 03-05-2006, 06:19 PM   #7
Kevin McKay
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Hey Chris,

Does the cinnamon work? How do you take it?
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Old 03-05-2006, 07:16 PM   #8
Chris Forbis
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I don't get blood work done often enough to know if it works or not, but it certainly doesn't seem to have hurt anything. I've just been taking it since I saw it mentioned in the Performance Menu. If something is cheap and Robb has good things to say about it, I usually spring for it.

Sane people mix it in with oatmeal. I don't eat oatmeal, so I take it straight and quickly wash it down.

http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/23/7782.html

(Message edited by forbis316 on March 05, 2006)
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Old 03-06-2006, 03:14 PM   #9
Garrett Smith
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I put cinnamon in my tea, makes the tea taste better and is easy to take in a spread-out manner.
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Old 03-06-2006, 04:19 PM   #10
Mark Gebhard
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Chris, you take cinnamon straight? Wow, that's hardcore. Tried it once and never again. Now I put it in empty gel capsules that you can order online from various vitamin stores.

[edit:] If you haven't taken a bunch of cinnamon before, be prepared for the cinnamon burp, although it's not quite as bad as the fish oil variety.

(Message edited by mgebhard on March 06, 2006)
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