CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-07-2011, 09:22 AM   #21
Nicholas Borek
Member Nicholas Borek is offline
 
Nicholas Borek's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Saratoga Springs  New York
Posts: 136
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

You all do realize that being 175 @ 5'7 isn't excess weight, right? And that would help you get stronger and perform better? Less kill-able and more injury proof?

And for the record, I think John Welbourn called you a girl.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 09:24 AM   #22
Katherine Derbyshire
Member Katherine Derbyshire is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Seattle  WA
Posts: 7,596
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

It's worth noting that eating more doesn't necessarily mean gaining huge amounts of weight, either. There's a wide range between anorexic teenager and 70s Big eating everything in sight.

In the OP's case, it's possible that his stall is in part because he isn't eating enough to support his (high) activity level and recovery. He can experiment to see if eating more helps without necessarily putting on 30 pounds.

2700 calories a day is not actually "a lot," given his activity level. So it might be worth upping that, and would definitely be worth playing with macronutrient ratios.

It's also entirely possible that he's simply reached the limits of linear progression. That happens. SS doesn't work forever. Lots of other methods exist.

Katherine
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 09:56 AM   #23
Shane Skowron
Member Shane Skowron is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Queens  NY
Posts: 3,800
Arrow Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emily Mattes View Post
As for Shane, 35lbs is not a small amount of weight, especially if even a small percentage of that is muscle. You can't dismiss it so easily as inconsequential to his strength over you.
I'm 18-19 lbs more than him, not 35.

Jared, as you can guess I too am one of those guys who prefers to stay small. Yes, there are advantages: less food to eat daily, get to keep wearing the same clothes, less weight to carry during endurance and bodyweight workouts, easier for a buddy to carry you if you're injured in emergency situation, and the surprise factor is just a bonus.

That said, I think adding a few more pounds would be a good idea. Not 60 like people are suggesting. Like 5-8.

Look at the guys who are lifting the most weight for your weight class. Sure they can lift a lot more at that same bodyweight, but they also have a different ratio. Most of the good guys in my weight class from what I can tell are about 5'5" - 5'7". Liao Hui, current C&J record holder in 69kg class, is 5'6". I'm 5'8" so that's taller than optimal for my weight class, I think.

If you go into the next lighter weight class, the best in the world is Zhang Xiangxiang, and he's less than 5'3".

But then again there are guys who are skinnier than optimal who do good work. Look at Tom Martin, he's 5'10", 176# and he deadlifts 776# (4x).


I'm not an expert on strength or anything, although I think it's time to ditch linear progression entirely. Get on a low rep, high volume program that has heavy days and light days. I think you can get a lot stronger at your current bodyweight, but there's room for a ton more if you add 5-8 lb.

Last edited by Shane Skowron : 04-07-2011 at 10:00 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 09:58 AM   #24
Michael Henry
Member Michael Henry is offline
 
Michael Henry's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Houston  TX
Posts: 480
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared Ashley View Post
I'm looking to have some folks weigh in on their personal experiences with having to reset with linear progression. I've done LP before, but this is the first time I've truly stalled on the squat, and the stall surprised me for squats.

I went from 3x5 at 195 all the way to 255 without missing a rep, squatting twice a week and increasing in 5 lb increments. Previously I had never done 3x5 higher than 225 lbs, and had a 1RM of 270. Then I went:

260: 5, 4, 2 (ok, no big deal)
260: 5, 3, 1 (a surprise)
260: 1, 0, 0 (holy crap!)

Obviously it's time to reset, and I will. I'm just curious if others have had a stall hit them that hard before. And before anyone asks, no, I'm not eating to gain weight (not consistent with my goals), but I'm not losing weight either. Yes, I do some metcon, mostly short (under 10 minutes), and with a weekly long run ("long" meaning usually 5ish miles, and once a month a true LSD run since I'm preparing for a marathon in october). My LSD run is coming up this week, so I haven't done one recently enough for that to be the cause.

Other recent lifts:
BP: 150x 5, 4, 4 (2nd attempt... 1st attempt was 4, 3, 2)
DL: 285x 5
SP: 110x 5, 4, 4 and 115x 3, 2, 2

I am 5'7", 135 lbs, 29yo

I've stalled a couple times at 325x5 on LP, still doing 2 short metcons per week. I switched to 5/3/1, still 2 metcons per week, and decided to stick to that for 4 months (two weeks left.) I like to play basketball and run 5K's, so my gains will be limited by that. Also, I weight about 190 now, and don't really want to gain any more weight since I don't want to buy new clothes.

I guess my point is it seems like you've maxed yourself out on LP. Go 5/3/1 and see if get anything else out of it. You seem to already know that the extra stuff you are doing is limiting your gains.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 10:00 AM   #25
Chris Walls
Affiliate Chris Walls is offline
 
Chris Walls's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Battleford  SK Canada
Posts: 1,722
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

The guys in your weight class COMPETE at that weight. They don't LIVE and TRAIN at that weight. Put on 10-15 lbs and watch your lifts go up. Or don't and watch them stall. It's your call but you have all the information you need. You know the answer, asking the question to different people won't change the facts.
__________________
Accept no excuses, only results
CrossFit North Battleford
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 10:35 AM   #26
Nicholas Borek
Member Nicholas Borek is offline
 
Nicholas Borek's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Saratoga Springs  New York
Posts: 136
Wink Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

50 mg bull shark testosterone directly into the carotid 2x/day. Don't worry, its just for recovery.

Last edited by Nicholas Borek : 04-07-2011 at 10:58 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 12:46 PM   #27
Robert D Taylor Jr
Member Robert D Taylor Jr is offline
 
Robert D Taylor Jr's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Chesapeake  VA
Posts: 1,736
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared Ashley View Post
If pure strength was my only goal, you'd be right. Other goals exist.

Instead, I want to be able to run, hike, and backpack over rugged terrain at altitude, activities where knees and lungs reward those who are small, strong for their size, and have above-average endurance, and punish those who are lugging around 50 lbs of surplus muscle and fat and are unaccustomed to prolonged activity.

Also, I want a body suited to skydiving, a sport where my small size is actually a huge advantage (less mass is easier to maneuver, takes up less space in the door, and I can add weight in a belt to fall faster but a big guy can't take weight off to fall slower).

Thus, I am not asking advice on how to get crazy strong. That's easy... eat a ton, cut the metcons, don't run, lift heavy. I am instead looking to optimize my strength at roughly my current size. the record raw squat in the 132 lb weight class is 551 lbs, so I hardly think my PR of approximately half that is the limit of what I can achieve without adding a bunch of muscle.

Back to the original post, I'd like accounts of how others lifts looked when they stalled, and how much further were they able to go after a reset. The posts thusfar answer a different question and thus are not useful.
Jared,

I respect your goals and honestly have no good answer for you. I would like to just point out to you that extra weight will not limit you or keep you from meeting your goals.

I offer you the Leap Frogs, all expert parachutists, most likely at least adequate "hikers" and have above average endurance. I've known several past members of the Leap Frogs and are familiar with their "type". None of them weight 135 at 5'7" probably more like 165-175. Perhaps you are putting an artificial limit on yourself.
__________________
Experience is a hard teacher because they gives the test first, and the lessons afterwards. - Vernon Sanders Law
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 01:16 PM   #28
Chris Walls
Affiliate Chris Walls is offline
 
Chris Walls's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Battleford  SK Canada
Posts: 1,722
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

Oh, and being heavier does not make you fall faster. Just saying...
__________________
Accept no excuses, only results
CrossFit North Battleford
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 01:28 PM   #29
Arturo Garcia
Member Arturo Garcia is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Santo Domingo  Dominican Republic
Posts: 1,875
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

What is this nonsense that I see so many people on these boards doing so often, that consists of comparing oneself to the world's best? Last time I checked the world has 6,700 million people. Even comparing yourself to the top CrossFitter isn't fair. Some are just meant to be stronger than others, I think...
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2011, 01:33 PM   #30
Joshua Gritton
Member Joshua Gritton is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Louisville  KY
Posts: 461
Re: Linear progression, stalling, and resetting

Your goal is to maintain running shape? Adding weight especially muscular weight is not going to hurt your running....it can only help it.

More weight more muscle to move the slight increase in body size. Just my opinion and I run my 10k in 5:30 to 6:30 split miles on a bad day.

You don't have to be 200lbs but you don't need to be 135 to be a good marathoners or endurance athlete. I think a optimal weight for you if you are following an endurance sport would probably be between 160-170lbs. I know 30lbs sounds like a lot but in the scheme of things it will help you in all aspects while having little to no effect on your running speed or times.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linear Progression + Tumbling Mac Oneill Fitness 4 03-02-2011 09:03 PM
Have I Exhausted Genetics in Linear Progression? Colin McLafferty Fitness 43 02-20-2011 07:16 PM
Linear Progression on the Press When to go to 2.5 lb. jumps? Will Patterson Fitness 13 10-22-2010 02:49 AM
linear progression hugh driscoll Fitness 27 04-12-2010 04:32 PM
Linear Progression Jakub Kruhlik Starting 4 07-30-2008 11:04 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.