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Old 11-29-2006, 11:20 AM   #21
Blair Robert Lowe
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The only one I've ever heard of running Ninja Camps are Richard Van Donk and Rick Tew. That's in the states.

You could always check out Winjutsu.com yellow pages under Canada.
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Old 11-29-2006, 06:54 PM   #22
Barry Cooper
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I was in the Bujinkan for about 6 years, and as far as I can tell, the level of quality is all over the place. There are some outstanding people, and some of them seem to me more graceful than anything else.

The arts are solid, and in my personal view, should be taught as functional units, not mixed and matched the way they are. There are 8 historical schools taught in the Bujinkan (and one which is claimed, but not taught, possibly two), each of which is in effect a stand-alone martial art, or at least an internally consistent composition of related ideas and techniques. Most of the "ninja" (one meaning of which, by the way, is "one who perseveres") stuff is in Togakure Ryu. They have short sword techniques, funky weapons, blinding powders, etc.

Most recently, I was in the Jinenkan, but I'm really not active at the moment.
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Old 11-29-2006, 07:10 PM   #23
Joey McIninch
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Only time I ever got arrested, me and my "ninja" friends got arrested by the Yukon Oklahoma Police Dept, for climbing on the roof of the Yukon Community Center at about 9pm one night, we climbed up on each other's shoulders making a "human ladder" but when we came down the po-po was on scene and took our kamas and nunchackas away :crybaby0: I think that was in 1982??? Needless to say, I can't wait to be able to do a back handspring again and fit into my ninja suit!!!!:haha:
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Old 12-01-2006, 12:01 PM   #24
Yael Grauer
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One who perseveres? I thought ninja meant, "one who continues fighting even when there is an arrow piercing his heart" or something like that. I always thought that was so tragic and beautiful.
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Old 12-01-2006, 12:57 PM   #25
Blair Robert Lowe
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For your definition, the title in any culture of " warrior " would suffice.
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Old 12-01-2006, 05:04 PM   #26
Matthew Nielsen
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My wife is Japanese (Okinawan) and I just asked her what the Kanji for "Ninja" means.

She said, "the sneaky people."

Funny, my Grandfather would have said the same thing about the Japanese.

^just a joke, no one freak out^

http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/21357/33556.jpg
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Old 12-01-2006, 07:56 PM   #27
Blair Robert Lowe
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Heh, Japanese are a sneaky people. They have a monotonic language yet words context is different depending on the tone of spoken words.
I could get flamed for this one, but if memory serves; the character for woman twice together means gossip, and thrice means conspiracy. While all languages and cultures have somewhere in them, the ability to say one thing and mean another ( in America it's the art of BS ); it just sticks with me in the case of the Japanese.
There's more to to this, but it's just part of what ninjutsu really is.
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Old 12-03-2006, 08:52 AM   #28
Barry Cooper
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The character--which can also be pronounced Shinobu, generating an alternative name for ninja of shinobi--consists of two parts, in my understanding. The top part is the kanji for blade, and the bottom for heart.

In my understanding, you derive the meaning of perseverance by considering the condition of someone enduring the threat of danger and death, a strong heart being threatened with a blade.

The second meaning is along the line of stealth, sneakiness, subtlety. This one can be derived from considering both characters as combined, with a blade concealed in a heart, one's motives concealed, moving silently in both a literal and metaphorical night.

If you study Japanese etiquette--for example the proper way to handle a sword--it is quite clear trust was not a common commodity. In Takagi-Yoshin Ryu, from what I can tell(I am just a beginner) there are quite a few kata based on someone attacking you while you're eating or discussing something.

There is, however, a third possible meaning, to my understanding unaddressed historically, which is the movement of the heart TOWARDS the blade.

In the process of enduring violence towards you, you can still "walk" towards the person hurting you, with an open heart. This, in my view, is the hidden--or insufficiently articulated--message of Christianity.

This would imply both ongoing forgiveness, as well as the lack of a necessity to hate your enemies, even though you may need to kill them.

These arts themselves don't work well when you are overcome with emotion. The whole focus of training is keeping a cool mind and relaxed body, no matter what is happening. The damage you do to your opponents comes from craftsmanship, which consists of timing, distance and alignment, executed through the mold of historically proven techniques. You don't need to tense every muscle in your body to stab someone fatally, or break their neck.

One sees this clearly on the physical level, but as far as I can tell, this potential deeper meaning has been entirely missed by most teachers. This likely has much to do with the elective, and non-necessary nature of contempory martial arts.
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Old 12-03-2006, 05:01 PM   #29
Blair Robert Lowe
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Awesome post, Barry, and not one I would expect on this forum to be so detailed. More of something I would expect on Kutaki.
The other night, I was reading into the sub characters and opening this thread to post but didn't figure most readers would be concerned.
I'll forward this to my friends in the Booj.
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Old 12-03-2006, 08:30 PM   #30
Yael Grauer
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According to a few Bujinkan guys I've spoken with, Hatsumi was not chosen to be the grandmaster for his physical skills, but because he had the best heart.
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