CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Injuries
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Injuries Chronic & Acute

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-16-2006, 05:56 AM   #11
Elliot Royce
Member Elliot Royce is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Inowa  KS
Posts: 922
Adam:

Glad to hear that you got things diagnosed. Yes, I tend to agree that it's better to avoid operations at any cost as long as you can bear with the pain. Also, you can't work through the pain but you can work around it. Don't give up on the exercises, just find ones that don't worsen the pain levels. That book by Dr. Sarno is excellent support for you.

The medrol is fine but carries risks. It's prednisone which can cause destruction of your bone. With one 6 day course it's unlikely that will happen. I've had 3 6 day courses over a 3 year period. I use it as a last resort. Prednisone is a corticosteroid which is extremely potent. My orthopedist said that it's a lottery when you take it whether you get AVN (bone destruction). However, like a lottery, your chances of your number coming up, are low. Don't let them give you more than 1-2 packs per year.

If your weakness persists, consider asking for a nerve function test (EMG I believe it's called). They measure the electrical impulses from your brain to the affected areas (leg in your case) to see how much interference the pressure on the nerve is causing. If it's too much for too long, you can get permanent muscle damage. Again, it sounds like you're moving the other way, so don't stress out about it.

I have persistent interference at C5/C6 and my neurosurgeon said to operate, but frankly with CF and other activities I've eliminated the weakness. The doctor said that if I ever stopped exercising I would be more at risk for loss of muscle function. I get pain from time to time but can manage it with NSAIDs. Stretching, acupuncture, massage, working on my posture, avoiding excessive contraction of my neck muscles, etc. all help. I would imagine that the doctors don't want you to do too much ab work to avoid contracting the spine in that area.

Finally, I know how frustrating this type of thing is. There is no good choice: only the lesser of two bad choices. And you're probably much younger than I am so it's probably even more frustrating. But keep in mind that a) it will probably clear up completely and b) even if it doesn't, the chances are that you can manage to do very well with occasional pain or discomfort. The worst thing is to let it get you down or limit your activities excessively.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2006, 07:11 AM   #12
James Hall
Member James Hall is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Gatesville  Texas
Posts: 61
Adam,

I agree with Elliot. In Western society, we are very quick to operate. It's the 7-11 solution. In 5-10 years, studies show that both groups are in th same place. Do what you can when you can, and function improves.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2006, 06:36 AM   #13
Elliot Royce
Member Elliot Royce is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Inowa  KS
Posts: 922
James:

Absolutely right. A doctor friend of mine sent me a study on a very large sample of patients and there was no difference in clinical outcomes between the patients who had surgery and those who didn't at 5 years post-op. At one year, there was a difference. I have it somewhere if someone wants to email me. It was on cervical patients if I recall.

Having said that, I know that some people have gotten tremendous relief from the operation, although there is then an increased risk of herniation on the surrounding disks.

I think it comes down to pain and side effects. If you have to take opiates for more than a short time to manage the pain, if your muscles are wasting, if you have numbness, etc. I'm not sure there's a lot of choice. Although the thing about most pain is that you can put up with it for another day, and day by day, you may get better on your own.

(Message edited by eroyce on June 18, 2006)
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2006, 09:21 AM   #14
James Hall
Member James Hall is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Gatesville  Texas
Posts: 61
Elliot,

I heard it said somewhere, that unless you're peeing on your drop foot (obviously bad signs), don't see a surgeon.
I had a similar experience ~3 years ago. Sudden onset LBP with radicular symptoms down left lower leg. Inconsistent bladder control, no drop foot. Couldn't stand for 3 days. Slowly over time (~6 months), returned to almost normal function. My wife said "Maybe you should see a doctor!". I didn't and got better with time. Gave me a whole new perspective on LBP and patients. Great learning experience!!
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2006, 03:59 AM   #15
Adam McCollough
Member Adam McCollough is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: DuJayl  Sal Ah Din
Posts: 5
In defense of the surgeons I saw 2 of them and they both recommended against surgery which was very surprising. They told me that surgery would make it feel better tomorrow, but quoted the same study that said both surgery and non groups are the same at about 4 years and on.

Yes, no situps was another perscription. Crunch all you want, but don't subject your back to the extreme flexion of situps for at least 3 months.

I have been exerecising and haven't had any problems. I've been doing mainly body weight exercises and some stuff with extremly light weight. Things seem to be getting better but it is much more difficult to measure progress at this point.

I got Pain Free by Egoscue and the back book by McKenzie and their stuff was pretty common sense and the stretches and exercises that they recommend have basically become my warm-up and seem to help. I'll have to check our the Sarno book when I get back home.

I think the biggest help has been a constant attention to posture. I never realized how poor it was before especially when sitting at a desk. A self made lumbar roll with a towel has really helped.

It is frustrating but I'm only 30 and am historically a fast healer. My main goal at this point is not to do anything stupid to make things worse.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2013, 07:08 AM   #16
Firat Keler
Member Firat Keler is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kutahya  Kutahya
Posts: 13
Re: Any experience with a sequestered disc?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3025225/
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2013, 08:18 AM   #17
Daniel Pope
Member Daniel Pope is offline
 
Daniel Pope's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Waterford Works  NJ
Posts: 492
Re: Any experience with a sequestered disc?

The issue with disc herniations is that they can be completely asymptomatic unless they begin compressing spinal nerves.

The reasons for pursuing surgery would be constant un-remitting intolerable pain, loss of bowel/bladder (pooping and peeing yourself) or worsening neurological symptoms (if your weakness was getting worse, making it tough to do functional activities like walking).

Sounds to me like things are getting better and you're on the track to recovery! Like your doc says, discs can be resorbed and even in patients where the discs DON'T resorb, they usually have a decrease in symptoms and increases in function. Discs usually tend to resorb by 3-6 weeks, but that doesn't mean you'll be ready to roll by then. It really depends on the individual! If you're into reading literature here's a bit of good stuff - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22154147

Moving forward with this injury my advice would be to go slowly. Don't rush anything. Find a good PT to help get you out of pain. Moving forward I would be very careful that place your spine in a flexed (rounded position). this is going to stress the discs bigtime. There will be good days and bad days.

From a rehab perspective over the next year or so I'd place my emphasis on core exercises that focus on endurance. I'd learn to move from the hips with a braced spine during all exercises. Hip and thoracic spine mobility can be beneficial as well. As you begin introducing crossfit exercises back in go slowly, take it a day at a time. Use light weights and only progress if your body is feeling good for it.

As others have said, low back pain and disc herniations are usually not a life sentence but may be something that requires upkeep for years to come.

Sorry for the longwinded response, good luck in the future and keep us updated.
__________________
Physical Therapist, Coach, Athlete - My website: Injury Prevention Info so you can continue to enjoy crossfit pain free http://fitnesspainfree.com/
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bulging disc...need help Amy Hedderly Injuries 19 06-10-2007 07:41 AM
Bluging Disc L4-L5 Fiona Muxlow Injuries 7 01-19-2006 07:57 PM
Bulging Disc Nikki Young Injuries 12 12-27-2005 03:25 PM
Herniated Disc Matt Toupalik Injuries 8 01-06-2005 09:21 AM
Herniated Disc Alex Kus Injuries 9 04-24-2004 03:58 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:58 AM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.