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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 04-17-2011, 09:45 AM   #11
Mauricio Leal
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

The squat is completely scalable, even to those who can't get to parallel unweighted. If you can get out of a car and walk through the gym door, there is a level of air squat you can do. If you rode a wheelchair in you need physical therapy, not crossfit yet. Loss of squat function puts people in homes before loss of walking function does, because it is an unavoidable movement in daily life that is full ROM and thus challenging. I've had clients who could not squat who could still Deadlift 70#. Cardio won't help you when you can't get out of a chair. A case could be made for stair/hill climbs because at least it includes bigger ROM.

It is disheartening that doctors feel like they can't prescribe things that are good for people because they are "hard" and people are just inherently lazy. I got an idea: tell people the truth, lead, and remind them that at most 2 generations separate them from millennia of hard-working MFers from which they descend.
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Old 04-17-2011, 09:50 AM   #12
Robert D Taylor Jr
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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then you start with squats to a chair and push-ups from the knees.

most movements are scalable.
None of which are going to be as functional or have as great an effect on quality of life as going from inactive to walking 20 minutes per day.
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:20 AM   #13
Sam Ser
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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None of which are going to be as functional or have as great an effect on quality of life as going from inactive to walking 20 minutes per day.
by "inactive" do you mean comatose? because anyone who gets out of bed and goes to work each day does much more than 20 minutes of walking per day *already*. so how much more beneficial will even a brisk walk be (assuming no load and no incline), compared to 20 minutes of strengthening and mobility exercises?

anyway, let's not pretend that we're arguing about whether a given person, as deconditioned as they may be, should walk *or* do strengthening and mobility exercises *exclusively*. if this hypothetical person were to be told to spend 20 minutes per day in *some* activity, couldn't they be told to spend half their days walking briskly, and to spend the other half getting stronger and more flexible?

isn't it conceivable that such a mixed, balanced approach would provide greater health benefits than a simple walk-every-day approach? and if so, why *not* prescribe such a course of action? especially since the walk-every-day approach has failed so miserably?
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:21 AM   #14
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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this can't possibly be true. a brisk 30-minute walk represents but a tiny fraction of the activity that even relatively sedentary people do each day. and the benefits of this additional activity are infinitesimal.
How many people get in their cars, drive to work, sit all day, drive home, and then sit in front of the TV all evening?

It seems incredible to me, too, but it's true.

Katherine
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:23 AM   #15
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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then you start with squats to a chair and push-ups from the knees.

most movements are scalable.
Enormous numbers of elderly people cannot get out of a chair without using their arms. Those same people typically cannot get up from the floor without help.

Katherine
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:30 AM   #16
Sam Ser
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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None of which are going to be as functional or have as great an effect on quality of life as going from inactive to walking 20 minutes per day.
furthermore:

the elderly folks who are falling and breaking their hips, leading so often to irreversible loss of function and rapid decline of health, *are* walking. what they are *not* doing, though, is squats and walking lunges and fire hydrant exercises and the like for strength and balance in the hips, knees and ankles.

and, the obese folks who are getting type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure and sleep apnea and whatnot *are* walking. what they are *not* doing is thrusters and kb swings and sprints and assisted pull-ups and the like.

so, no, it does not appear that simply walking a little more is having as great an effect on quality of life as these other exercises -- which i am sure you value highly -- would.
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:36 AM   #17
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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Enormous numbers of elderly people cannot get out of a chair without using their arms. Those same people typically cannot get up from the floor without help.

Katherine
sure... but those people would benefit immensely from training to develop the strength to do so. in fact, they *do* benefit immensely, when they are trained to do so.

(there are studies that show this, with significant reduction in arthritis symptoms and increases in bone density, in elderly folks who began weekly strength training only in their 70s. i have also seen it myself, in a few clients. i am sure that there are people here on this board who have trained far more elderly clients, with great success.)

see, grannies who walk a little more each day do not develop the strength to rise from a chair without using their arms, or to rise from the floor without assistance. they still need help to make it to their walking sessions.

but grannies who train for it, do develop the strength to rise from a chair, or from the floor, unassisted.

...their walks get much easier, too.

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Old 04-17-2011, 11:39 AM   #18
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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How many people get in their cars, drive to work, sit all day, drive home, and then sit in front of the TV all evening?

It seems incredible to me, too, but it's true.

Katherine
they still take thousands of steps each day. a few hundred more won't do much.
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:43 AM   #19
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

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see, grannies who walk a little more each day do not develop the strength to rise from a chair without using their arms, or to rise from the floor without assistance. they still need help to make it to their walking sessions.

but grannies who train for it, do develop the strength to rise from a chair, or from the floor, unassisted.

...their walks get much easier, too.

Completely agree with all of this. A nurse friend of mine pointed me to research showing that strength -- and particularly quadricep strength -- has a *huge* correlation with all kinds of quality of life issues in elderly people.

Unfortunately, that kind of training requires a lot more equipment and personal attention than walking around the neighborhood for half an hour, which means it's a lot more expensive and Medicare won't cover it. :-(

Katherine
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Old 04-17-2011, 11:45 AM   #20
Mauricio Leal
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Re: Times Article Highlights the Benefit of HIT

This also reminds me of something I saw on an affiliate's FB page recently, which apparently was originally posted by Glenn Pendlay (although he might've borrowed it from elsewhere too).

If you're looking for a reductionist philosophy on the low end spectrum of fitness and nutrition, it's practically that simple.
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