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Old 01-28-2004, 01:35 PM   #1
Paul Kayley
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Anybody tried GLA supplementation?

I have just found out that it is possible to have a genetic inability to manufacture enough prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 - a very good eicosanoid), due to a failure in the production step from LA to GLA production.

Do you have an EFA deficiency?

In his book "Essential Fatty Acids and Immunity in Mental Health, Charles Bates, Ph.D., provides a list of factors that suggest an essential fatty acid deficiency:

-Ancestry that is one-quarter or more Celtic, Irish, Scandinavian, native American, Welsh, or Scottish.

-A tendency to abuse alcohol or feel that it affects you differently from others; trouble with alcohol in your teenage years.

-Anxiety or depression during hangovers

-Depression among close relatives

-A family history of alcoholism, depression, suicide, schizophrenia, or other mental illness.

-Depression that persists while you are abstinent from alcohol.

-A personal or family history of Crohn's disease, hepatic cirrhosis, cystic fibrosis, Sjogren-Larsson syndrome, atopic eczema.

-A personal or family history of ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, premenstrual syndrome, scleroderma, diabetes, or benign breast disease.

-Experiencing an emotional lift from certain foods or vitamins.

-Winter depressions that lighten in the spring.

Formula for Depression due to EFA Deficiency


Barry Sears does not recommend supplementation of GLA as he says an overspill can result in more bad eicosanoids being produced. However, if the main factor controlling the final destination of GLA is insulin/glucagon dominance, as suggested by Rob in NHE, then if in overall glucagon dominance how can excess GLA be of any harm?

Anyone played with it?
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Old 01-29-2004, 08:38 AM   #2
Ryan Hagenbuch
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If you take Udo's Choice Blend, there is a nice blend of fatty acids. GLA is one of them. This is a very good product.
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Old 01-29-2004, 02:16 PM   #3
Robert Wolf
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In the Omega Rx Zone Sears has much better recomendations for the GLA in conjunction with fish oil.

The problem with the udos oil IMO is the use of flax oil.
Robb
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Old 01-30-2004, 05:57 AM   #4
Alexander Karatis
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Curious how much of an effect a single EFA can have on the already rich cocktail of pills and medicine given out to depression/manic depression patients.
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Old 01-30-2004, 10:27 AM   #5
Ryan Hagenbuch
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Rob,
Although Udo's has more GLA than Sears recommends per day (I believe its a few mg. a day and a serving of Udo's has 17 mg. if I remember correctly) it's still a good product. Yes, flax oil is the main ingredient, but if you only consume 1 tablespoon a day (1 serving) you get less than a tablespoon of flax and a good amount of GLA. This still puts you below what Sears calls excessive consumption in the Zone (anything over 1 tablespoon of flax oil/day)
In the bitter taste post below, you said that ALA isn't necessary. I disagree. Even Dr. Sears wouldn't go that far. There are only 2 essential fatty acids- ALA & LA. You can find that in any nutritional textbook. EPA is made in the body from ALA. Let me paraphrase the following from Mastering the Zone, page 293: "ALA has some use in controlling arachidonic acid (AA), but I recommend EPA. EPA has a 10 fold greater impact on controlling bad eicosanoid production than ALA and EXCESSIVE consumption of ALA tends to reduce the production of GLA. What's excessive? Anything more than 1 tablespoon/day."
As long as you don't go over this amount, you should be fine. ALA has its own set of functions in the body and most people don't get much in their diets. I do agree that you should supplement with fish oil (EPA) because you need several factors (vitamins/minerals) in sufficient quantities for your body to manufacture its own EPA. A small amount of ALA isn't going to harm you.
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Old 01-30-2004, 03:50 PM   #6
Paul Kayley
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What oils do you get from almonds/peanuts? ALA?
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Old 02-03-2004, 09:43 AM   #7
Ryan Hagenbuch
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Paul,
Almonds and peanuts have mostly monounsaturated fats which don't effect eicosanoid product. They also have some Omega 6 fats, but basically no Omega 3 (ALA).
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Old 02-03-2004, 09:57 AM   #8
Ryan Hagenbuch
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Comments, Rob?
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