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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 07-15-2006, 06:53 AM   #1
Ricky Dawson
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Hello to all,
My situation right now is i can hold a Tuck planche for about 30 seconds. The problem i have is that my hips may not be high enough to transfer to the ATP...can anyone confirm this? is it a flexibility issue? or lack of stength?

to give you an idea my hips are the same height as my head, the are the same level as the frog stand in coach sommers article...is this ok? in the TP it is much higher!!

I notice that in the ATP pics the hips seem to be just above the head, also in Jims ATP pics too..

I have tried just pushing up as high as i can without worrying about holding the TP, how can i get them higher, or is this ok?
from what i can gather the hips should be in line with the head for a straddle or normal planche?!

I work the TP every other day at the mo, and on my off days i do planche supports (in a pushup position leaning as far forward as possible then pushing back to support) i figue if the proble is the amount i can lean forward in the TP is a limiting factor that this may help gain the needed strength...

I've also just got my back lever to a decent hold (around 8 seconds) and working on my front lever (in the advanced for 15 seconds)

just looking for some ideas/inspiration if possible.

thanks guys.
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Old 07-15-2006, 03:05 PM   #2
Paul Siatczynski
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I've been wondering the same thing, but my hips are below head height.
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Old 07-15-2006, 06:27 PM   #3
Lynne Pitts
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OK, there's no digital here. You need to post some pics or video for it to be digital! Moving to Exercises.
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:28 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Honestly, it doesn't really matter that much. They should be around head height or slightly above it. The reason why they are slightly above head height in a lot of the pictures is because that is an easier position to hold for a longer time than holding them directly at head height. If you are lower than head height (Paul), then you need to get them to head height or higher. It is easier to level it out by dropping your hips down slightly in the end than it is to raise them up at the end. Don't let your body sag. If anything, put it a bit too high IF you must. I would definitely say to try to keep it level regardless.

The reason why it is slightly easier is basically the same reason why getting closer to a handstand is easier than getting closer to a planche -- the reduction in the lever length from the fulcrum. With your hips slightly above your head, you are tilting the axis of your body from horizontal to slightly angled which increases the leverage (compacting the mass into a smaller diameter with your hands as the balance point -- e.g. if you drew a right triangle with the angled body and then looked at the side horizontal to the ground, you would see that the lever length decreased which will equal a reduction in the net torque) thus reducing the tension on the shoulders slightly. While taking this into account though, there is an actual increase in tension on the shoulders because you are leaning forward more than you would have it you had kept it level BUT this is more than offset by decreasing the lever length the small amount (e.g. this is synonymous to the increase in shoulder tension from going to a handstand down to a planche).

Really though, for all intents and purposes don't worry about it too much. Just focus on getting in the quality time and keeping your hips horizontal with the ground. If they are a bit high, that's fine; however, if they are a bit low then get them up!

Oh yeah, I forgot -- if your hips are too low, just push out with your shoulders more and/or lean forward more. It is usually one of those two and NOT a flexibility issue at all.

(Message edited by braindx on July 15, 2006)
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Old 07-17-2006, 01:54 AM   #5
Kathryn Steen
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mine are a bit (ok--alot) low. any suggestions on how to get them up. i lean forward and press as hard as i can, but to no avail.
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Old 07-17-2006, 08:37 AM   #6
Roger Harrell
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Kathryn, try coming down into them from above. Push off the floor into a bit of a tucked handstand then lower down. If you can not control this, you just need to spend more time on your hands. Handstands, and hand support skills can take quite some time to really get solid.
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Old 07-18-2006, 02:18 AM   #7
Kathryn Steen
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ok, i'll try that. is that also and acceptable method for front levers? when i practice my front levers, i kick all the way up to an inverted hang on the rings and then lower my self down to parallel with the ground (tuck position). if i try to go from just a regular hang to pulling myself to horizontal, it tears my shoulders up.
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Old 07-18-2006, 04:52 AM   #8
Steven Low
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Whatever works without messing your body up. :proud:
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Old 07-18-2006, 08:37 AM   #9
Roger Harrell
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Yeah, the front lever is far easier when lowered to from above. Eventually you'll want to be able to pull up into it, but that is tough. Start on top lower to tucked lever. Then start playing with single leg levers, then straddle, then bring your legs together and voila (significant time passes) you have a front lever.
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Old 07-18-2006, 11:06 AM   #10
Kathryn Steen
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thank you for the suggestions. i played around with lowering into a tucked planche this morning and it turned into something more closely resembling a controlled crash. can i assume that is fairly normal? will keep working on it...:crazy:
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