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Old 05-05-2011, 03:13 PM   #1
maurice gabay
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Question crossfit physiology

Just started crossfit 101 three nights ago. I'm liking it but I would like to have deeper understanding as to why doing high intensity for very short time is "better" than lesser intensity for longer duration.

I'm looking for literature on the subject. Can anyone suggest any physiology studies relating Kreb's, Glycogenolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP with crossfit? I want to understand the "three metabolic" engine theory behind cross fit?
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:57 AM   #2
Larry Hotchkiss
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Re: crossfit physiology

The crossfit journal has some papers on these subjects but dont recall if they link to any specific scientific studies. They would likely help you carry your search over to pubmed and the like though.
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Old 05-06-2011, 07:57 AM   #3
Shane Skowron
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Re: crossfit physiology

Quote:
Originally Posted by maurice gabay View Post
Just started crossfit 101 three nights ago. I'm liking it but I would like to have deeper understanding as to why doing high intensity for very short time is "better" than lesser intensity for longer duration.

I'm looking for literature on the subject. Can anyone suggest any physiology studies relating Kreb's, Glycogenolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP with crossfit? I want to understand the "three metabolic" engine theory behind cross fit?
Better for what?
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:39 AM   #4
Jared Ashley
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Re: crossfit physiology

Maurice:

Two things: First, you probably won't find any scientific literature regarding crossfit. What you CAN find is literature relating to interval training vs. steady-state training. Such studies will generally show that one group doing high-intnesity intervals, usually on a stationary bike, has better performance outcomes than another group doing steady-state workouts. It's very interesting, but understand the limitations of these studies... usually it's a 12-week timeframe using sedentary test subjects doing an unskilled activity. Results may be very different if they instead used say high-school track stars.

Second, as Shane said, "better for what?" Don't get me wrong, CF is a great system... better than most. but it's truly a "general" system. It will help you build a great base of fitness, from which most successful atheletes will decide to specialize, either in strength, endurance, or a skilled activity (i.e. sport). At that point, one's training tends to shift more toward the specialty and away from the CF-style workout. A lot of people will still use CF ideas, but probably won't use main-page programming as their base.
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