CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-07-2003, 09:37 AM   #1
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
At the end of last month I had my first general check up in about 10 years. Although most everything looked fine across the board, my blood pressure was high (144/86). I've measured it a couple of times since the appointment and it has hovered around the same level. My doctor is having me come back in about 5 weeks to check it again. I'm pretty sure that if it's at the same level, he will prescribe a diuretic or some other medication. I've decided to supplement with magnesium in an attempt to lower my blood pressure and avoid what may be unnecessary medication. According to the Eades doctors a chelated form of magnesium is best absorbed by the body. For chelating agents they suggested citrate, malate, and aspartate. I went to a health food store today and bought a bottle that had 'Magnesium Citrate' on the label. When I looked at the ingredients label however, it said that it also contained Magnesium Stearate. Is this as good as the chelating agents mentioned above? Also the serving size to get 400mg is two tablets. Would it be best to take one early in the day and one in the evening or will this make no differnece?

Thanks in advance for any help,

-Ryan
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2003, 11:45 AM   #2
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Ryan-
The magnesium stearate is inferior to the complexes you mention. Source Naturals has a product called UltraMag and it is exclusively chelated forms. A sneaky labeling technique is to claim the more expensive chelating product but the bulk of the product is Mg-oxide. SN's also has a potassium/mag combo which is what I would recomend.
One can achieve a strong diuretic effect with a combo of Corn silk (about 2-4g/day brewed as a tea) and 500mg b-6. Take a b-complex in addition to this to avoid problems with supplementing only the b-6.

I am assuming your issue is NOT hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin levels cause the body to retain sodium) so try to limit sodium. Hyperstimulation of the sympathetic NS can cause vasoconstriction which will lead to elevated blood pressure. Stress reduction coupled with a modality like Chines medicine can be very effective in turning the problem around.

Sorry if this is too much at once but it is what came to mind.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2003, 07:18 PM   #3
David Wood
Departed David Wood is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
 
Posts: 3,303
It's so nice to have a biochemist around the list when you need one!

Thanks, Robb, for knowing, and sharing, stuff that probably not 1 person out of a 1,000 can keep in his brain.

Dave
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2003, 10:34 PM   #4
John McCracken
Member John McCracken is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Canton  Michigan
Posts: 152
For further reading

Hypertension:

Managing Hypertension in Athletes and Physically Active Patients http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020801/445.html

High Blood Pressure and Exercise http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020801/457ph.html

The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. http://www.guideline.gov/summary/summary.aspx?doc_id=3744&nbr=2970&string=hypert ension


Magnesium:

Effects of magnesium supplementation in hypertensive patients: assessment by office, home, and ambulatory blood pressures. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9 719052&dopt=Abstract

Magnesium: its proven and potential clinical significance. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstra ct&list_uids=11811859

Protective role of magnesium in cardiovascular diseases: a review. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1 2349904&dopt=Abstract&itool=iconabstr

Role of magnesium in the pathogenesis of hypertension. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=1 2537992&dopt=Abstract&itool=iconabstr

  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2003, 11:33 AM   #5
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
Thanks to everyone for the replies.

Robb- I would doubt if the problem was from high insulin levels. I've been following an almost purist version of the PPL for several months now (occasional milk with my protein powder to ward off Patrick's holsteins!). I never add any salt to my food. Are there paleo foods that naturally have a lot of salt in them? Next time I visit one of my mentors in Madison, I'll have give me a look over (he's a certified accupuncturist). With regards to stress reduction, everytime my blood pressure was measured, my wife was nearby. Hmmmm, there might be a correlation:lol:.

Dave- I definitely have to join you in thanking Robb. His advice in several areas has been invaluable. I wanted to originally title this post 'A question for Robb Wolf' but I think we've seen that at least once. If we keep doing that it'll be increasingly difficult to browse through the nutrition section of this board - a lot of the thread names would be identical!

John - Thanks for the list of resources. You'll keep my addiction for reading satisfied for quite some time.

Thanks again to all.

-Ryan
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2003, 10:40 AM   #6
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
I'm all a blush!
Seriously...thank you all for the kind words. Always my pleasure to help.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2003, 03:37 PM   #7
F
Departed F  is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 1970
 
Posts: 64
On a similar note, despite being very fit, I'm starting to slide into consistent mild hypertension (134/74). This problem is new to me....

I'm currently training for a 52km rucksack race and heavily using sports drinks (Gatorade, etc.) post-workout. Considering the ingredients, can sports drinks affect blood pressure?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2003, 05:02 PM   #8
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
F-

If you are producing either a very large insulin spike or an elevated insulin level for a long enough time ( this varies greatly person to person) you may be getting an increased aldosterone effect which retains sodium in the kidneys and can elevate BP.

Crhronic elevated cortisol like that found in overreaching/evertraining can also be a factor.

The authors of Lights Out: Sleep, Sugar, Survival make a strong case for elevatd insulin and cortisol also resulting from exposure to light while we sleep (soulution: sleep in a very dark room). I have no idea if any of these are the causitive agent or if it might be a combination but you do have a few avenues to explore.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2003, 12:08 PM   #9
Ryan Atkins
Member Ryan Atkins is offline
 
Ryan Atkins's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Racine  WI
Posts: 925
It's been over a week since I started the magnesium supplementation. It appears to be working - my blood pressure was at 120/72 yesterday. I was wondering if there may have been another factor at work, however. According to what I've read recently, diuretics reduce blood pressure by removing excess sodium from the body. In the process they deplete the body of water, magnesium and potasium (? - not sure of that last one). During the past week I increased my mma training significantly - sparring several hours more than usual. Since I sweat a lot during these sessions, could the activity itself acted as a natural diuretic, shedding off the excess sodium through my sweat?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2003, 05:42 PM   #10
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Ryan-

It is certianly possible the increased activity is a factor, however the body is non-linear in that as we excrete more sodium mechanisms to retain sodium typically become up-regulated. The increased activity can reduce stress, enhance insulin sensitivity, and physically remove sodium (and chloride...perhaps the more important ion) from your system.

The drop in BP is significant and good. Keep an eye on it and if it starts creeping above 70 diastolic let us know and more tinkering can be done.
Robb
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
20 years old, high blood pressure?! Tom Ellison Injuries 7 12-03-2008 01:48 PM
High Blood pressure Question Aaron Wilson Injuries 10 08-02-2006 11:22 AM
Blood Pressure James Montana Injuries 2 12-05-2004 12:43 AM
Potassium and magnesium supplementation Paul Kayley Nutrition 1 05-02-2004 12:34 PM
Father - High Blood Pressure... Jay Edvardz Nutrition 2 01-13-2004 03:49 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.