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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 09-04-2007, 10:05 AM   #21
Brian De Mio
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

Hi,

I'm not absolutely certain but I think the original theory of Cooling down came from the idea that if you just stopped blood flow (by lying down and not moving around) you would cause a build up of lactic acid and thereby increase muscle soreness and possibly cause cramps.

I remember reading or possibly studying something about this back in 1987 ish when I was studying sports medicine at Denver Tech. However I couldn't find any of my old books so I probably tossed em.

I don't necessarily subscribe to that theory since my heart rate is moving at more than 3 times what it is normally even if I stop so the blood is still flowing. Sure would be interesting to see what study all this debate originated from though.

Heck my grandmother believed you should drink hot coffee on a hot day to cool off because icewater would cool you down too quick and make you ill. Ain't no way I'm arguing with my Grandma! But I digress...
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Old 09-04-2007, 03:18 PM   #22
Tom Corrigan
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Not the issue

The issue is can "stopping cold" trigger an arrhythmia and/or cause excessive strain to the heart? (possibly due to cavitation)

The muscle soreness/ lactic acid issue is more of a training problem than a life and/or health threatening problem.

Cavitation is huge issue with artificial heart pumps (google it) but it would be more enlightening to get some cardiologists commenting on this possibility, not lay people like myself.

Someone mentioned about how you have to lay down so they can check out your heart after a stress test. While that is true, it's because the machines are stationary, and it's easier for them to jam and rub the device (sonogram?) into your ribs with you laying on your back with your arms up and out of the way. [had this done to me about 7 years ago]

Again, what I have experienced is that if I walk slowly around (instead of standing still) my heart rate lowers quicker and I feel "better". One timeI found myself standing still for about 30 seconds after my HR was around 185 - my HR went up to just over 200, and I started feeling a bit nauseous. But when I walk around slowly, it drops 15-20 beats every 30 second, so I'm down around 120-130 after about 2 minutes.

The risk is very, very low for having a full blown arrhythmia, and then a fatal heart attack, but the problem is predicting who it is gong to happen to. Is it worth taking the risk? Kind of like Rhabdo, I think we ought to educate ourselves about this rare, but deadly post-exercise event.

I'd like to hear others experiences with different kinds of "cool downs" and how it effects their heart rate and perceived recovery.
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Old 09-04-2007, 07:51 PM   #23
Darrell E. White
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

Tom:

Check out 9/2 Comments for the thoughts of an international electropysiology/cardiology expert, around #40 or so under "bingo".
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Old 09-06-2007, 08:38 AM   #24
Tom Corrigan
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

Thanks, but which post are you taking about? I can't seem to find it.

Is the guys sig name "bingo" ?

What is the thread name?

Could you supply a link?

Thanks,

Tom
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Old 09-06-2007, 10:38 AM   #25
Darrell E. White
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

Tom:

Comments on the main page, Sunday 070209 (Sunday 9/2). Comment #44 is the explanantion from an electrophysiologist's viewpoint. Lon Kilgore responds at #289. Coach responded on Rest Day #53.
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Old 09-07-2007, 01:10 PM   #26
Tom Corrigan
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

Thanks.

So I guess the take home is do what you want - if you're gonna die, you're gonna die, whether you walk around or flop...

Here would be an interesting experiment - during fight gone bad, have groups wear HR Monitors and have half flop and half walk around between rounds. See which group recovers better from max or near max HRs... Linking to performance would be problematic with small groups, but with larger groups and known PRs, it would give better data.
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Old 09-07-2007, 01:49 PM   #27
Brandon Oto
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

I'm not sure if the issue is recovery time; it seems like the issue is not dying.

Recovery time is more of an issue during the workout, if you're trying to rest for a Tabata interval or something.
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Old 09-08-2007, 01:53 PM   #28
Tom Corrigan
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

What I meant was, since the issue of dying has been "solved" by the cardiac experts (it happens either flopping or walking) then from a realistic/functional standpoint, what form of recovery works better. Life throws a lot of challenges at you, and sometimes you get a break, sometimes you don't. I think it would be worthwhile to experiment with what would help you recover better when you get a rest break - flop or walk.
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Old 11-15-2007, 07:34 AM   #29
Tim Donahey
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

I don't like to imagine after finishing a WOD going over to the rowing machine and working out for another 5-10 minutes at a low intensity, but is some kind of active cool-down the way to go to enhance recovery (let alone diminishing cardiac arrest)?

Does anyone have a cool-down routine that they usually do?
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Old 11-15-2007, 09:53 AM   #30
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Re: Assessing the Cool-Down

I suppose theoretically ideal thing would be to keep moving mellowly through the same motions as you used in the WoD with reduced load, but that's not really possible for a lot of things (how are you going to reduce an air squat?).
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