CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Health and Medical Issues
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health and Medical Issues For other than injuries

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-30-2013, 09:31 AM   #1
Nicholas Dixon
Member Nicholas Dixon is offline
 
Nicholas Dixon's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Louisville  KY
Posts: 142
Exercise induced asthma or something else?

Okay, quick back story. I used to do CrossFit pretty regularly a few years ago. Was in pretty good shape. Then I got married, got older, and got fatter. I decided a couple months ago to get back into shape and started doing some body weight exercises. A few weeks ago I started using a sandbag. Just a few days ago I started running again, which is where the problem started.

I was absolutely fine until I started running. I had a few lower leg cramps in the first few minutes, but ran them out. After around 20-25 minutes, I had pretty much worn myself out and had to stop. I got the usual light headed running feeling and the whole "sliding across the ground" when I was walking it off for a few minutes afterwards, but that evening I developed an "itchy" feeling in my chest and the urge to cough.

I've never gotten that itchy chest feeling and I'm wondering if I'm developing asthma or if maybe it's just allergies (I live in Kentucky, which is notorious for having terrible pollen levels)? It's been over 24 hours and I still have a slight itch and cough, but it seems to be subsiding a bit.

I take vitamin B12 and D supplements per the doctor's orders and I'm currently on an antibiotic for an unrelated (i.e., non-respiratory) infection. I've had bronchitis in the past, I have fairly severe allergies, never diagnosed with asthma.

Is this normal for someone who has had minimal exercise for the last couple of years? Am I being paranoid?

[Edit: Also, been eating fairly unhealthy the last couple years and have just recently gone back to eating paleo-ish with the addition of occasional servings of Greek yogurt and some grains, mostly wild rices.]

Last edited by Nicholas Dixon : 04-30-2013 at 09:35 AM. Reason: Additional information
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 01:21 AM   #2
Chris Jones
Member Chris Jones is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Charlotte  NC
Posts: 790
Re: Exercise induced asthma or something else?

i think its probably just the fact that youve been more sedentary for the past couple years and then went out and ran a little too hard. Ive had this happen a couple times, whether i was focusing on strength and let me cardio slip a little or when i pushed myself harder than i should have and i knew it.

Mine usually ends up being like a scratchy feeling in my throat, and i get weird dry coughs and my lungs just feel weird for an hour or so afterwards. If its not better the next couple of workouts you can always go have it checked into.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 08:38 PM   #3
Chris Girgis
Affiliate Chris Girgis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Cypress  TX
Posts: 54
Re: Exercise induced asthma or something else?

Even though you weren't necessarily doing a "short" intense workout, keeping in mind that intensity is relative to the given individual and their physical state, it sounds a bit like this:

http://falloutcrossfit.com/2011/08/2...ung-sensation/ (WFS)

Here's an explanation from another site:
Since people often ask about “Fran Lung” here’s the basic explanation. It’s a form of flash pulmonary edema where you body is essentially drowning itself. Primarily due to the high rep, moderate weight thrusters and the short time in which they’re done, your body consumes a large amount of oxygen and generates a lot of lactic acid quickly. These both create a massive drive to breathe to blow off the acid (as carbon dioxide) and breathe in O2. Since people who do Fran are generally young and very fit, your diaphragm and chest wall muscles are able to generate a huge amount of force when breathing in. This creates a large negative pressure gradient in your lungs that actually sucks fluid out of the capillaries within your lungs and into the airspaces themselves. Although the amount of fluid is relatively small, it’s enough to slightly impair your ability to exchange O2 and CO2 and make you feel like you’re drowning (burning, coughing, air hunger). It generally takes at least 20-30 minutes for your body to reabsorb enough fluid back into your lung capillaries to get rid of most of the symptoms, but it can take 12-24 hours to reabsorb all the fluid which is why it takes so long to feel right again.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2013, 07:07 AM   #4
Nicholas Dixon
Member Nicholas Dixon is offline
 
Nicholas Dixon's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Louisville  KY
Posts: 142
Re: Exercise induced asthma or something else?

Interesting information!

It turns out I was starting to get a respiratory infection and the running just exacerbated it. Was coughing up lumps of green mucus (gross, sorry)!

Probably allergy induced thanks to the massive amounts of pollen in the air at the moment.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Fran Lung" a subset of Exercise Induced Asthma Thatcher R. Cardon Health and Medical Issues 14 12-18-2009 12:10 PM
My exercise induced asthma, compare to yours Larry A Henrikson Health and Medical Issues 12 09-20-2008 08:57 AM
Exercise induced asthma? Jason Naubur Health and Medical Issues 4 03-14-2008 06:38 AM
Nutrition for exercise-induced asthma Corey Duvall Nutrition 5 10-12-2007 07:29 AM
Exercise-induced Asthma? Elliot Royce Injuries 7 01-24-2007 12:37 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.