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Old 11-20-2008, 01:59 PM   #437
Brandon Oto
Member Brandon Oto is offline
 
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Santa Cruz  CA
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Re: T-Nation, Shugart and the Truth About CrossFit

An important point on the purpose of scientific scrutiny on CrossFit:

Strictly speaking, the evidence available in the community, even ignoring issues like control, supports adaptation in certain areas, most of all in improving WoD results. (This is the main data mine available.) On a much smaller basis is available numbers like bodyfat and blood markers. What is largely NOT available is data on the CROSS-APPLICABILITY of the CrossFit adaptation -- that is, "how much it makes you better at other stuff," from football to shoveling gravel. The thing is that this is a critical area to look at, because the claim is that the program makes you better at everything, particularly things we don't even do -- whereas improving WoDs is only evidence that you got better at WoDs and the movements therein. It's possible that you improved at absolutely nothing else. Is it likely? No. How much did you improve at other stuff? Some of us know personally, but there's no data mine for this, and THIS is the core piece of feedback for a GPP system.

In the terminology you guys like, you can't really say you've improved across all time and modal domains if the only time and modal domain you're testing are CrossFit workouts. EVERYONE would accept that you got better at that. There's absolutely zero controversy in saying that you get better at the stuff you're doing. The controversy is whether it made you better at shoveling gravel, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat McElhone View Post
At this point we can not longer say CF works based on a black box model. Off the top of my head, the Canadian Infantry, Marine Force Recon, Naval Special Warfare, Colorado State Police have all done comparisons of the effects of implementing a CF based PT program vs traditional PT program and shown that CF based program produced high fitness levels (as defined by their physical fitness tests) with less injuries.
Can I see that material? I'm only familiar with the published Canadian study.