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-   -   PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey (http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=68244)

Luke Seubert 06-25-2011 04:18 AM

PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Why I Am Posting This Here
This thread is meant to be a bit different from the usual Workout Log threads posted in this subforum. Instead of posting workouts, which I will do in the future under a different post title; I will post updated information about my PaleoZone fat loss regimen. While this is a bit unorthodox, there are some good reasons for my doing this.

First, the PaleoZone Diet is the recommended diet of CrossFit. As this thread will show, when properly adjusted, PaleoZone is very good for fat loss as well as for optimum physical performance.

Second, the vast majority of threads posted to the Workout Log forum are written by people who came to CrossFit in something like halfways decent shape, not morbidly obese people like me. My hope is that this thread will provide inspiration and information for very obese people who would like to someday do CrossFit workouts, but who must first lose substantial amounts of bodyfat. I hope that this thread will elicit informed comments, suggestions, and improvements for fat loss regimens; so that those of us in need of it can more readily share such information about how to lose large amounts of fat.

Finally, there are personal reasons for my posting here. I hope to get some positive encouragement during those times when I am in need of it. Also, I believe that going public will help me to stick to the diet over the long term and to fully accomplish my goals. This is where I stake my flag!


Beginning Status as of May 4, 2011
Sex: Male
Age: 45
Height: 6 feet, 2 3/4 inches - 190 cm
Bodyweight: 425.6 pounds - 193.0 kg – measured daily
Total Body Measurement*: 1009.5 cm - 397.5 inches
Body Fat Composition: Approximately 48.6% - measured daily
Lean Body Mass: Approximately 218.8 pounds - 99.2 kg
Fat Body Mass: Approximately 206.8 pounds - 93.8 kg

*Total Body Measurement equals the sum of right and left upper arms, forearms, wrists, thighs, calves, ankles, and neck, chest, waist, and hips and is measured once a week.


Goals
10% Body Fat Composition, followed by
Starting Strength Weightlifting Program, followed by
CrossFit Scaled WODs, followed by
CrossFit Rx'd WODs, followed by
CrossFit Strength Bias WODs

If I can go straight down to 10% Body Fat Composition, I will do so. However, I might hit a plateau wherein my body reaches a set point and I just can't drop any more fat at that time. Hopefully, if I hit such a set point, it will be at 15% BFC or less. In such a case, I will stabilize my caloric intake to match my body mass and activity level for a few weeks, and then begin the Starting Strength Weightlifting Program along with a Lacto-PaleoZone Diet with increased daily caloric intake. If I can't hit 10% BFC directly, then I'll try gaining some muscle and changing my metabolism and so work my way to it from the other direction.


Progress to Date as of June 25, 2011
Bodyweight: 388.8 pounds - 176.4 kg
Total Body Measurement: 970.5 cm – 382.0 inches
Body Fat Composition: Approximately 46.3%

During the past 7 1/2 weeks, I have lost roughly 2.3% on my body fat composition. Bodyweight loss is 36.8 pounds - 16.7 kg. I lost 9 pounds - 4 kg in the first five days due mostly to water weight loss as I significantly improved my potassium to sodium intake ratios. Since then, most of my weight loss has been fat, with very small amounts of muscle loss. Since the end of Week 1, I have been consistently losing approximately 4.1 to 4.2 pounds - 1.8 to 1.9 kg each week. Since the beginning of my regimen, my total body measurement has declined from 1009.5 cm - 397.5 inches, to 970.5 cm – 382.0 inches, a total loss of 39 cm – 15.5 inches.

Despite such high weight loss rates, my mental acuity and energy levels have gone up. While I remain mostly sedentary, I do engage in more physical activity day to day than I did before I began the diet. I also occasionally do some light exercise such as walking or helping a friend to move furniture. I rarely get hungry, as the PaleoZone diet keeps me well satiated. So far, PaleoZone is working very well.


My PaleoZone Diet Plan
My diet is based upon very lean sources of protein, such as extra lean cuts of beef, pork tenderloin trimmed of fat, whole turkey with the skin removed, and shrimp. My carbohydrates come from a wide, colorful variety of very low - 35 or less - glycemic index vegetables, with a special emphasis on dark leafy greens - 480 grams, just over a pound - consumed per day. Fats come from the meats I consume, as well as extra virgin olive oil, some nuts, and once in a while, high cocoa content chocolate.

Each day, I drink 7 quarts of water, and try to drink one quart about half an hour before each meal. With my water before each meal, I also take a large fish oil capsule.

I consume about 2,000 calories per day, or roughly 335 calories per meal, which is the caloric intake recommended for somebody with my lean body mass and activity level according to the Zone Diet. I consume 6 meals per day, beginning shortly after I wake up until just before I go to bed. Each meal contains very close to 30 grams of protein – a bit more than my Zone Diet protein prescription, 20 grams of carbohydrate, and 15 grams of fat. I use a computer to precisely calculate the quantities of food for each meal recipe based upon these macronutrient amounts.

My overall macronutrient ratios as percentages of calories consumed are as follows: Protein - 36%, Carbohydrate - 24%, Fat - 40%. While these are not the usual Zone Diet ratios, they are well within the norms of the Paleo Diet. Moreover, due to my genetics I am very carbohydrate sensitive (that's how I got so damned fat in the first place – I have Metabolism B), which is why I have minimized carbohydrate intake and switched to very low glycemic index vegetables.

While 2,000 calories is not very much for a man of my size, and while my carbohydrate intake is quite low for a Zone Diet; computer analysis confirms that I am getting more than enough vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and micronutrients each day. This is due to the high quality, nutrient dense sources of protein, carbohydrates, and fats that I consume.

I began this diet as an experiment, planning on running it for two or three weeks, and then bumping up the daily caloric intake. Why? Because everybody “knows” that 2,000 calories a day is not enough for even a sedentary 6'3" man with 220 pounds of lean body mass. However, as Nicole Carroll has pointed out, it is amazing how few calories you can thrive on when you PaleoZone. I have more energy and mental alertness than before I began, and my physical activity level has gone up. So, I have decided to continue with the very low calorie regimen. I might have to change it someday, and consume more calories per day. But for now, I am content with the rapid progress I am making, and my body's response and feedback.

The downside is that my version of the PaleoZone diet is very hardcore and disciplined. I literally weigh all my food to the nearest gram, eat on a strict time schedule, and only allow myself one “free meal” each week. However, the task before me is quite challenging. I have a LOT of fat to lose, and so an exacting regimen is required. Those with smaller fat loss goals might not need to be quite so stringent. Meanwhile, I'll put up with the onerous discipline in exchange for losing four pounds of fat per week while feeling pretty good. Moreover, in the future, when I work my way through Starting Strength followed by CrossFit WODs, I'll have the necessary experience and dietary discipline to ensure maximum performance thanks to excellent nutrition.


Tools
Tanita HD-351 Scale - Measures bodyweight
Bodyweight Trend Computation (exponential moving average with 10% smoothing) - Smooths out bodyweight data for easier tracking of bodyweight loss trends
Omron HBF-306 Fat Loss Monitor - Roughly tracks body fat composition
120 inch - 300 cm Tape Measure - Measures chest, waist, and hips
MyoTape - Measures upper arms, forearms, wrists, thighs, calves, ankles, and neck
NutritionData.self.com - Accurate and precise daily menu and recipe planning
Index Cards - Hardcopy of recipe information for each PaleoZone meal


Knowledge Resources
Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It by Gary Taubes
Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes
Food and Western Disease: Health and Nutrition From an Evolutionary Perspective by Staffan Lindeberg
The Paleo Diet: Lose Weight and Get Healthy by Eating the Foods You Were Designed to Eat, Revised Edition by Loren Cordain
The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet by Robb Wolf and Loren Cordain
Mastering the Zone: The Next Step in Achieving SuperHealth and Permanent Fat Loss by Barry Sears
Toxic Fat: When Good Fat Turns Bad by Barry Sears
The Metabolism Miracle: 3 Easy Steps to Regain Control of Your Weight . . . Permanently by Diane Kress
The Dukan Diet: 2 Steps to Lose the Weight, 2 Steps to Keep It Off Forever by Pierre Dukan (Emphasizes consumption of very low glycemic index foods - 35 G.I. or less.)
The Hacker's Diet by John Walker - WFS (This is the source of the exponential moving average calculation which I use in my spreadsheet to better understand weight loss trends. See Chapter 11 "Pencil and Paper" on Page 284.)

Luke Seubert 06-26-2011 06:35 AM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Water: The Primal Nutrient
Water is the most essential of all nutrients. Without water, humans die within days, whereas humans can survive for months without food and other nutrients. For best health, one needs to drink a sufficient quantity of fresh, filtered, and properly stored water each day at the appropriate times.

Water should be far and away the primary source of liquids consumed each day. Minimize beverages such as coffee or alcohol. Eliminate soda pops and fruit or vegetables juices which have too much sugar and/or sodium. Herbal teas and especially green teas are acceptable alternatives for plain water.

When to Drink Water
One should always drink some water when thirsty. Additionally, drink a glass of water about half an hour before each meal. This ensures proper hydration for good digestion and metabolism. Drink additional water if sweating excessively due to hot, humid weather, or hard exercise.

Filtering Water
Ideally, one should drink only fresh, filtered water every day. Fresh water is water from the cold water tap which has been running for about a minute. Avoid water straight from the tap as the water just begins to flow - it has been sitting in the pipes for a while and may have picked up micro-contaminants. Avoid water from the hot water tap, as water tends to go stale in the hot water heater as well as pick up contaminants. Be sure to filter a fresh batch of water each day sufficient for that day's needs. Water should be filtered to remove bacteria, viruses, organic compounds, and metallic contaminants for best health. Filtered water is far, far more economical over the long term than bottled water. Among the best water filters available are Berkey Filters equipped with Black Berkey® Purifier Elements. This is the Pleasant Hill Grain Berkey Water Filter webpage (WFS).

For the record, I have no financial or familial relationships of any kind with the companies or products listed in this post. I just provide these links for the convenience of those who are reading.

Storing Water
The best containers for storing water are sealed glass and stainless steel containers. Both glass and stainless steel are highly resistant to contaminating the water with either bacteria or chemical residue. Plastic bottles can leech chemicals into the water, and with age, harbor bacteria. Also, stainless steel and especially glass containers minimize odd flavors or odors, providing the best tasting water. The following webpages from the Specialty Glass Company list half-gallon jugs with caps and one gallon jugs with caps (Both WFS).

How Much Water to Drink
The body's bio-chemical reactions work best in the presence of water, including those reactions which reduce body fat. Therefore, sufficient hydration is essential to good health and fat loss. The bare minimum amount of water one should drink is 64 fluid ounces per day. However, this is likely an insufficient amount of water for proper hydration for many people. Here are several different formulas for computing optimum daily water intake:
Minimum Ounces of Water to Drink Each Day = Pounds of Lean Body Mass x 0.64
Minimum Ounces of Water to Drink Each Day = Pounds of Bodyweight x 0.50
Minimum Ounces of Water to Drink Each Day = 64 ounces + 8 ounces for each 25 pounds of bodyweight you need to lose
People who are quite obese should be careful when using the second formula based upon Bodyweight, and adjust water intake down in most cases, lest they suffer from water toxicity. Instead, they should consider using the third formula.

In the end, despite all my research into formulas for proper hydration levels, the best guide I found for proper hydration level is if one produces at least four pale yellow urinations per day. Listen to your body as it tells you when it is sufficiently hydrated.

Luke Seubert 06-27-2011 07:21 AM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Dealing With Metabolism B
In her book, The Metabolism Miracle: 3 Easy Steps to Regain Control of Your Weight . . . Permanently, Diane Kress discusses what she calls, "Metabolism B". Diane is a clinical nutritionist with many years of practical experience dealing with severely obese people who really struggled to lose fat and keep it off. Based upon her years of research, study, and clinical practice; she concluded that many of her patients suffered from what she called "Metabolism B", a genetically based, high sensitivity to simple carbohydrates such as sugars and starches, leading to big gains in bodyfat. Although she is not a fan of the Atkins Diet (neither am I), over time she came to appreciate the wisdom of the Atkins induction phase, during which people consume almost no carbs for a number of weeks. Eventually, Diane developed her own prescription for "Metabolism B" patients, in which they consumed only five grams of net carbohydrates (total carbs minus dietary fiber) every five hours, keeping total net carbs very low over the course of a day. After eight weeks of this very low carb regimen, giving the liver time to recuperate from a high carb diet and to adapt to burning fat for fuel, her Metabolism Miracle diet calls for a gradual but moderate increase of carb intake over time. She cites great success with this approach, and wrote about her clinical experiences in her book.

While I did not embrace the specifics of Diane Kress's fat loss regimen into my own version of the PaleoZone Diet, I did draw inspiration from it. I realized that I had "Metabolism B" to a severe degree, like many of her patients. I later found out that about 75% of the human population has "Metabolism B", though most have less severe forms than I do. 25% of people have "Metabolism A" and they are naturally skinny no matter how many garbage carbs they eat - the damn little scrawny bastards :yikes: As a result, I decided to switch to very low Glycemic Index vegetables, which are low in net carbs due to their high fiber content. (This is also a recommendation of the Dukan Diet.) I also decided to consume more protein than carbs, given my unusual sensitivity to carbohydrates, but without going to moderately high protein, high fat extremes like the Atkins Diet. So far, this decision has served me well. I am losing bodyweight rapidly, I feel good, I have more energy, and I am getting all the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals I need from the healthy foods I eat.

So, for those of you who likewise suffer from "Metabolism B", lower your carb intake to levels equal to or lower than your protein intake, and switch to very low Glycemic Index fruits and veggies. Or, pick up Diane's book and follow her specific recommendations.

How to Tell If You Have Metabolism B
Take the following survey of Personal Symptoms. If you are answering yes to 10 or more of these statements, you might very well have "Metabolism B".
Personal Symptoms - Answer Yes or No to the following statements.
  • _____ You only seem able to stick to a diet for a short time before you get discouraged by dismal results, constant hungers, and cravings.
  • _____ You tire easily and frequently feel fatigued, even upon waking.
  • _____ You feel mildly depressed.
  • _____ You get an energy slump in the late afternoon.
  • _____ You frequently feel anxious.
  • _____ You crave carbohydrate foods, such as bread, chips, sweets, or pasta.
  • _____ You have a roll of fat around your mid-section.
  • _____ You gain weight easily and find it difficult to lose those extra pounds.
  • _____ You have trouble sleeping.
  • _____ You are often forgetful and worry about your short-term memory.
  • _____ You have racing thoughts.
  • _____ Your sexual drive has declined.
  • _____ You find it difficult to concentrate and are easily distracted.
  • _____ Bright lights or headlights at night bother you.
  • _____ You are irritable and have a 'short fuse'.
  • _____ You have increased sensitivity to aches and pains.
  • _____ You have tearing of the eyes with periods of eye dryness or redness.
  • _____ You have frequent dull headaches.
  • _____ You feel slightly dizzy, flushed, or 'weak in the knees' after ]even a little bit of alcohol.

If you are answering yes to many of the questions in the two following groups, you might very well have "Metabolism B".
Blood Test Results - Answer Yes or No to the following questions.
  • _____ Glucose under 65 or over 89mg/dL?
  • _____ Cholesterol over 200?
  • _____ LDL cholesterol over 99?
  • _____ HDL cholesterol under 50?
  • _____ Triglycerides over 99?
  • _____ Hemoglobin A1C….under 5.4 or over 5.8?
  • _____ Fasting Insulin…over 2.5?
Personal and Family Medical History - Answer Yes or No to the
following questions if the condition affects you or an immediate
family member.
  • _____ Overweight or obesity…weight around the middle?
  • _____ Lipid issues (cholesterol, triglycerides)?
  • _____ Hypertension?
  • _____ PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome)?
  • _____ Type 2 diabetes, pre diabetes, gestational diabetes?
  • _____ Fibromyalgia?
  • _____ Reproductive infertility?
  • _____ Chronic fatigue syndrome?
  • _____ Sleep apnea?
  • _____ Adult acne?
  • _____ Sleep disorders?
  • _____ Depression/anxiety?
  • _____ ADD/ADHD?
  • _____ Alzheimer’s disease?

Luke Seubert 06-28-2011 04:36 AM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Turning Bodyweight Into A Semi-Useful Metric
When losing fat, bodyweight is not considered a very good metric to follow. If you are losing both fat and muscle, bodyweight measurements will deceive you into believing you are doing better than you actually are, when in fact bad things are happening. If you are losing fat while gaining some muscle, bodyweight will deceive into believing things aren't going so well when in fact they are. Moreover, bodyweight fluctuates quite a bit from day to day, even if you measure it under the same conditions each day. Bodyweight produces "bumpy" data. For these reasons, bodyweight is considered an inferior metric to body fat composition or taking various body measurements with a tape measure, such as arms, legs, chest, waist, and hips.

However, bodyweight has one thing going for it. It is very easy to measure - fast too. Body fat composition is difficult to measure accurately and precisely in the home, and body measurements take time and fiddling. So, many people rely upon the fast and easy bodyweight metric, despite its limitations, because the better metrics are more trouble.

Happily, there is a way to turn bodyweight into a semi-useful metric - the exponential moving average with 10% smoothing. Huh? Wait... what? It sounds a lot worse than it really is. You set up a sheet of paper (or a spreadsheet) with three columns, labeled Date, Bodyweight, and Trend. As you enter bodyweight data each day, you apply a simple formula to calculate your bodyweight Trend. How simple? With a little practice, most people can do it in their head in a few seconds. The explanation of how to do it takes less than three pages from a small pamphlet-sized book, including extensive examples. You can find the Exponential Moving Average and how to calculate it in the free-to-download book, The Hacker's Diet by John Walker, (WFS) in "Chapter 11 - Pencil and Paper".

Once you are measuring your bodyweight and computing your bodyweight trend every day, you can reliably gauge your rate of weight loss over time. The moving average smooths out the bumpy bodyweight data and reveals how much bodyweight you are actually losing over the course of a few days, a week, or a month.

While bodyweight can still be deceptive, by using the exponential moving average with 10% smoothing, in conjunction with weekly body measurements and a handheld body fat composition meter, you can suss out pretty well what is happening. Are you really losing that much or that little fat? What is your muscle mass doing? What really happens when you change your diet or activity level? All of these questions become more clear, once you massage otherwise inferior bodyweight data and combine it with other metrics to clarify what was once muddled.

Nik Nichols 06-28-2011 11:27 AM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Hi ya, Luke, Welcom to the logs. I will watch out for your posts. It will be intresting to see how you do. Looks like you are well on your way. I hope you stick to it and stay consistant with it.

Brady Herrin 06-28-2011 11:35 AM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Really interested to follow your progress. Definitely subscribing. Good luck, God bless!

Luke Seubert 06-28-2011 12:10 PM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Brady Herrin (Post 954188)
Really interested to follow your progress. Definitely subscribing. Good luck, God bless!

Thank you Brady. I appreciate your subscribing, and your support.

Tomorrow, I'll start posting some hard data, kinda like what a CrossFit Workout Log is supposed to do, ya know? Actually, I'll be posting different sorts of hard data three days a week. The other four days I'll post little essays until I run out of things to say.

If you know folks who are quite obese but who would like to get into the whole Paleo/Zone/CrossFit thing, please refer them to this thread. My hope is that in time it will become a useful information resource for those who need to lose lots of fat. For that to happen though, I'll need other folks to post critiques, comments, suggestions, etc.

Luke Seubert 06-28-2011 12:15 PM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nik Nichols (Post 954179)
Hi ya, Luke, Welcom to the logs. I will watch out for your posts. It will be intresting to see how you do. Looks like you are well on your way. I hope you stick to it and stay consistant with it.

Hi Nik. Thanks for the compliment and the support. I likewise am optimistic about sticking with it. Posting to this thread frequently is one of the methods I am using to stick with my program. In one of my upcoming posts, I'll have some information about "Motivation Hacks", which should prove useful not just for fat loss, but for CrossFitting in general. Stay tuned...

Brady Herrin 06-28-2011 12:51 PM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
I've already forwarded this to my dad to have him print out. My mom is morbidly obese and is becoming very sedentary. With one knee replaced and the other in need, she'll probably never be able to do much of a workout, but I'm trying like stink to get her to get on a rational diet....

I'll definitely keep up with your thread. Great work so far!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luke Seubert (Post 954212)
Thank you Brady. I appreciate your subscribing, and your support.

Tomorrow, I'll start posting some hard data, kinda like what a CrossFit Workout Log is supposed to do, ya know? Actually, I'll be posting different sorts of hard data three days a week. The other four days I'll post little essays until I run out of things to say.

If you know folks who are quite obese but who would like to get into the whole Paleo/Zone/CrossFit thing, please refer them to this thread. My hope is that in time it will become a useful information resource for those who need to lose lots of fat. For that to happen though, I'll need other folks to post critiques, comments, suggestions, etc.


Luke Seubert 06-28-2011 05:03 PM

Re: PaleoZone vs Morbid Obesity: An Odyssey
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Brady Herrin (Post 954226)
I've already forwarded this to my dad to have him print out. My mom is morbidly obese and is becoming very sedentary. With one knee replaced and the other in need, she'll probably never be able to do much of a workout, but I'm trying like stink to get her to get on a rational diet....

Hi Brady. I'm glad you have found the information posted in this log to be useful. I hope your mother is encouraged to make the effort as well, and finds the various posts informative. Let me know how she is doing as time goes by.


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