CrossFit Discussion Board

CrossFit Discussion Board (http://board.crossfit.com/index.php)
-   Exercises (http://board.crossfit.com/forumdisplay.php?f=5)
-   -   Floor Press (http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=58754)

Jordan Riley McClintock 06-07-2010 07:34 PM

Floor Press
 
I already searched the boards and I could not find anything on it, so I thought I ought to might as well ask.
What is your opinion of the floor press as an auxiliary exercise to the bench press? Has anyone tried using it as one, and if so, do you consider it effective?
I follow CFFB and John put a photo up not too long ago of someone floor pressing, so I imagine he does not consider it a useless movement...

Victor Putz 06-08-2010 01:57 AM

Re: Floor Press
 
I'm hardly an expert, but when I was working through a SS cycle, I subbed floor press for bench press. It's not a perfect sub (restricted ROM is the most immediate problem) but has some decided benefits, not least of which being it's pretty impossible to drop the bar onto your neck (not that many people die from bench pressing, but if you're solo it's nice to know it's basically impossible with the floor press).

I'm not sure whether there is a compelling reason to do floor vs bench press if you have a bench (the real reason I subbed). But if you don't, it seems pretty reasonable.

Jordan Riley McClintock 06-08-2010 04:26 AM

Re: Floor Press
 
Sorry, I should have said assistance exercise. :icon_spee

Cameron Patterson 06-08-2010 08:41 AM

Re: Floor Press
 
Jordan

It really depends where you are weak in the movement. When you fail a max effort attempt, where in the movement do you fail?

Everyone will benefit from floor press because of the emphasis on the triceps in proper bench press technique. But if lockout is your weakness, as it is for many people, floor press is one of the best exercises you can do for it. Because of the limited range of motion, you will be able to really focus on developing your triceps and the lockout of the bench.

So the floor press is one of the best assistance exercises you can do for the bench. And for the crossfitter, the floor press will also have benefit for your overhead press.

Also, if you want more information, you can check out Louie Simmons articles on http://www.westside-barbell.com (wfs) or http://www.elitefts.com (mostly wfs)

Erik von Hoch 06-08-2010 05:07 PM

Re: Floor Press
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cameron Patterson (Post 794365)
Jordan

It really depends where you are weak in the movement. When you fail a max effort attempt, where in the movement do you fail?

Everyone will benefit from floor press because of the emphasis on the triceps in proper bench press technique. But if lockout is your weakness, as it is for many people, floor press is one of the best exercises you can do for it. Because of the limited range of motion, you will be able to really focus on developing your triceps and the lockout of the bench.

So the floor press is one of the best assistance exercises you can do for the bench. And for the crossfitter, the floor press will also have benefit for your overhead press.

Also, if you want more information, you can check out Louie Simmons articles on http://www.westside-barbell.com (wfs) or http://www.elitefts.com (mostly wfs)

Gotta agree whole heartedly with this one! I don't think there IS another assistance exercise that is as effective at training the lockout as the floor press. You can go MUCH heavier than your bench with no risk of injury. You get training in not only your lockout, but also your grip and your stabilizers as well. It doesn't really matter much if your chest/triceps are strong enough to bench 500lbs if you can't hold that much weight at lockout to begin with. If you MUST sub out this exercise (I suggest finding a way to do it though) you can always lay under neath a car and try pressing the back bumper. Roughly the same movement and no racks are needed :D But other than that, I would have to seriously search for something comparable.

Chris Mason 06-08-2010 06:55 PM

Re: Floor Press
 
Actually, you shouldn't really be able to floor press much more, or any more than you can full ROM press. One of the things about floor pressing is most people don't do it correctly. Part of the idea is to break up the eccentric/concentric chain much like a box squat. The lifter should lower the weight until their upper arms are completely resting on the floor. They should then begin the press. This makes the movement much more difficult.

You should use floor presses more for conjugate variety than as an accessory movement.

Daniel Higgins 06-08-2010 09:01 PM

Re: Floor Press
 
I agree with Chris, its a variant to max effort training in the bench (I've seen a lot of people use it in westside training). If you are floor pressing the same or more than a regular bench, your triceps are disproportionately strong. With the regular bench you have considerable leg drive and what I feel is more stretch reflex.

As for assistance, I use DB floor presses with a neutral grip. I feel that it trains the triceps and chest (although the rom through the pecs is less than a reg. bench). The only bench assistance I care to do now is either DB floor press or dips.

Erik von Hoch 06-09-2010 05:15 AM

Re: Floor Press
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris Mason (Post 794643)
Actually, you shouldn't really be able to floor press much more, or any more than you can full ROM press. .

How do you figure this? Most PLers I know can do a substantial amount more on the floor press than with a full ROM press. Just like the same goes with board presses. The last 2-3" of your press should be your stongest. I don't believe it's because your triceps are disproportionatly stronger, but because it's all triceps and shoulders for those last 2-3". I agree though that this shouldn't be just an accessory exercise, and should be trained just as hard as board presses/bands/chains. For PL that is.

Daniel Higgins 06-09-2010 05:49 AM

Re: Floor Press
 
The upper arm is usually paused on the ground and there is no leg drive.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:40 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.