CrossFit Discussion Board

CrossFit Discussion Board (http://board.crossfit.com/index.php)
-   Running a CrossFit Facility (http://board.crossfit.com/forumdisplay.php?f=16)
-   -   Affiliate Websites (http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=41450)

Alima Deneke 01-12-2009 04:23 PM

Affiliate Websites
 
It seems that Typepad.com is a popular site with Affiliates when building their website.
I have never used Typepad. Does anyone have pros / cons? Is it easy to use? Do you have another site to prefer?
Thanks for the input!

James lee 01-12-2009 04:36 PM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
I use www.squarspace.com (wfs). its an all in one (hosting, design, blog, etc).

here's my site - www.teamcrossfit.com (wfs)

if you need help with it, I personally offer design service using squarspace (initial design w/ logo, layout, etc) so PM me.

good luck!

Tobias W. Neal 01-12-2009 07:40 PM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
I will be honest I use typepad and in the right hands as in a web designer cool things can happen. If you are really interested in having a professional website done talk to Matt Brue at brue design. Check out our website and see just how far typepad can go...let me know if you are interested in talking to Matt.

T

Alima Deneke 01-12-2009 07:46 PM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Thanks to you both!
I don't have a lot of money to spend on website design at the moment so I am hoping to find a site that is pretty easy to build on my own. Once I get going, I would like to invest in a web designer.

Daniel Freedman 01-12-2009 08:20 PM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
In some ways, "what software platform do you use?" is the wrong question.The right question is: "what content should you put on your site -- and how does it promote your business?"

There is a wealth of wisdom on the affiliate blog on this very topic. Read it all! Then read it again -- and act on it.

In previous lives, I have been a web executive for broadcasters, publishing and high tech companies and think tanks. These days, I am a consultant to non-profits on social networking, membership recruitment and fundraising.

As a public service: here (gratis) are my top five Web mistakes of CrossFit affiliates.

#5 - Scaring off the potential members. Avoid home page photos or videos of shirtless dudes with tatoos. Remember: pictures overwhelm text. Many people will glance at the pics and conclude CrossFit is a black iron bodybuilding program for muscle heads.

#4 - Lack of plain English. Save the jargon for later. "Increased work capacity over broad time and modal domains" is an accurate description. But it is not immediately comprehensible to the uninitiated. So it shouldn't be at the top of your home page. Instead, talk about how CrossFit will get you in the best shape of your life.

#3 - Failure to harness your greatest asset -- the passion of your existing members. Testimonials are crucial. Include some from hardcore athletes, stay at home Moms, military, business people, students, etc.. Better yet, when prospective members visit the gym, provide them with handouts that list phone numbers of members who have agreed to endorse you.

#2 - No "about us" or "about the trainers" section on the website. Asked how he decided where to to invest, a wise venture capitalist once told me: "I look at the people before I look at the plan." In the end, CrossFit affiliates are selling the expertise of their trainers. So you MUST MUST MUST include detailed biographical information -- even if self-promotion doesn't come naturally.

#1 - Lack of regular updating. The Web is littered with abandoned sites. A site that hasn't been updated within the last few days begs the question: "are they still in business -- or is it just some amateur playing at business in a garage?" So there is also an issue of professionalism. There is a disconnect between asking for fees in excess of Globo gyms and not bothering to keep your site current.

Lisbeth Darsh 01-13-2009 05:36 AM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Freedman (Post 491662)
In some ways, "what software platform do you use?" is the wrong question.The right question is: "what content should you put on your site -- and how does it promote your business?"

There is a wealth of wisdom on the affiliate blog on this very topic. Read it all! Then read it again -- and act on it.

In previous lives, I have been a web executive for broadcasters, publishing and high tech companies and think tanks. These days, I am a consultant to non-profits on social networking, membership recruitment and fundraising.

As a public service: here (gratis) are my top five Web mistakes of CrossFit affiliates.

#5 - Scaring off the potential members. Avoid home page photos or videos of shirtless dudes with tatoos. Remember: pictures overwhelm text. Many people will glance at the pics and conclude CrossFit is a black iron bodybuilding program for muscle heads.

#4 - Lack of plain English. Save the jargon for later. "Increased work capacity over broad time and modal domains" is an accurate description. But it is not immediately comprehensible to the uninitiated. So it shouldn't be at the top of your home page. Instead, talk about how CrossFit will get you in the best shape of your life.

#3 - Failure to harness your greatest asset -- the passion of your existing members. Testimonials are crucial. Include some from hardcore athletes, stay at home Moms, military, business people, students, etc.. Better yet, when prospective members visit the gym, provide them with handouts that list phone numbers of members who have agreed to endorse you.

#2 - No "about us" or "about the trainers" section on the website. Asked how he decided where to to invest, a wise venture capitalist once told me: "I look at the people before I look at the plan." In the end, CrossFit affiliates are selling the expertise of their trainers. So you MUST MUST MUST include detailed biographical information -- even if self-promotion doesn't come naturally.

#1 - Lack of regular updating. The Web is littered with abandoned sites. A site that hasn't been updated within the last few days begs the question: "are they still in business -- or is it just some amateur playing at business in a garage?" So there is also an issue of professionalism. There is a disconnect between asking for fees in excess of Globo gyms and not bothering to keep your site current.

Well said, Daniel! Lots of good points.

Listen to his words, folks. He speaks the truth.

(And Alima, it's okay to start somewhere and change as you get better at blogging. Lots of people start with Blogger or Typepad, then move onto Word Press, Moveable Type, etc. Just jump in, roll up your sleeves, bang your head against the desk a lot, and learn. And get better. But the key throughout it all is not the design or SEO tricks or platform, etc -- the key is content. Unique, updated, useful content -- that features and appeals to your members. Everything else is secondary, even the platform.)

If you want to hear more on the topic of blogging and CrossFit, I talked about it on CrossFit Radio a few weeks ago. You can find the link here. (WFS)

Good luck!

Douglas Chapman 01-13-2009 07:04 AM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Freedman (Post 491662)
In some ways, "what software platform do you use?" is the wrong question.The right question is: "what content should you put on your site -- and how does it promote your business?"

There is a wealth of wisdom on the affiliate blog on this very topic. Read it all! Then read it again -- and act on it.

In previous lives, I have been a web executive for broadcasters, publishing and high tech companies and think tanks. These days, I am a consultant to non-profits on social networking, membership recruitment and fundraising.

As a public service: here (gratis) are my top five Web mistakes of CrossFit affiliates.

#5 - Scaring off the potential members. Avoid home page photos or videos of shirtless dudes with tatoos. Remember: pictures overwhelm text. Many people will glance at the pics and conclude CrossFit is a black iron bodybuilding program for muscle heads.

#4 - Lack of plain English. Save the jargon for later. "Increased work capacity over broad time and modal domains" is an accurate description. But it is not immediately comprehensible to the uninitiated. So it shouldn't be at the top of your home page. Instead, talk about how CrossFit will get you in the best shape of your life.

#3 - Failure to harness your greatest asset -- the passion of your existing members. Testimonials are crucial. Include some from hardcore athletes, stay at home Moms, military, business people, students, etc.. Better yet, when prospective members visit the gym, provide them with handouts that list phone numbers of members who have agreed to endorse you.

#2 - No "about us" or "about the trainers" section on the website. Asked how he decided where to to invest, a wise venture capitalist once told me: "I look at the people before I look at the plan." In the end, CrossFit affiliates are selling the expertise of their trainers. So you MUST MUST MUST include detailed biographical information -- even if self-promotion doesn't come naturally.

#1 - Lack of regular updating. The Web is littered with abandoned sites. A site that hasn't been updated within the last few days begs the question: "are they still in business -- or is it just some amateur playing at business in a garage?" So there is also an issue of professionalism. There is a disconnect between asking for fees in excess of Globo gyms and not bothering to keep your site current.

It looks like I am doing almost everything wrong.

Jennifer Conlin 01-13-2009 09:16 AM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Doug,
What makes you think your doing everything wrong?

Jennifer Conlin 01-13-2009 09:21 AM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Daniel,
Holy Crap my friend you nailed it! Well said! Thanks for writing that down. people like me have this stuff trapped in our heads and lack the writing skills to communicate it. Thanks!

Daniel Freedman 01-13-2009 09:31 AM

Re: Affiliate Websites
 
Douglas, I don't think you are doing everything wrong.

A good website should help you run the business the way you want it to run.
It shouldn't dictate any particular strategy. But it should attract clients of the type you seek -- not scare them away.

A quick glance at your site leads me to conclude you want only serious athletes willing to make a serious commitment. Your offer of a free personal training session is generous and the bio info is interesting. Maybe you should just emphasize this more. A few modest tweaks to the home page might bring you more business.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:28 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.