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-   -   Herschel Walker's Basic Training (http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=39610)

Aaron C Bennett 11-23-2008 12:23 PM

Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Has anyone read Herschel Walker's Basic Training (wfs) by Herschel Walker and Terry Todd? I just ordered it as I've seen it recommended at various places around the web. What do you guys think of it?

Steven Anderson 11-23-2008 12:31 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Eh, it was published in 1989 (almost 20 years ago), has one review, and appears to cost anywhere between $27-$42. Probably should have saved your money and subscribed to the CF journal. As far as costs go, CF mainpage WOD's are free as you should know.

Rob McBee 11-23-2008 12:32 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
I had a copy years ago when it first came out and wish I had held onto it. Can't go wrong with the hardcore basics. If you like Walker's book you wouldn't probably dig Ross Enamait's stuff too.
http://www.rossboxing.com (wfs)

Justin Baum 11-23-2008 02:18 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob McBee (Post 453802)
I had a copy years ago when it first came out and wish I had held onto it. Can't go wrong with the hardcore basics. If you like Walker's book you wouldn't probably dig Ross Enamait's stuff too.
http://www.rossboxing.com (wfs)

i did too! it was the book that inspired me to start working out in 8th grade. i started doing pullups and pushups (sometimes with a typewriter on my back) and running the stairs in my house. somewhere along the way i lost the book. i tried buying it within the last year but it was out of print and ridiculously expensive on ebay.

because of the impact he had on my life (as it relates to fitness), i named my dog, herschel.

David Wood 11-23-2008 05:44 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob McBee (Post 453802)
I had a copy years ago when it first came out and wish I had held onto it. Can't go wrong with the hardcore basics. If you like Walker's book you wouldn't probably dig Ross Enamait's stuff too.
http://www.rossboxing.com (wfs)


Ditto on all of this! Very basic (sprints, situps, bw stuff, and simple weightlifting), very hardcore, very motivating. I still have my copy and would not consider selling it.

I think Rob mistyped . . . . if you enjoy this kind of training, you probably *would* like Ross's stuff.

Phillip Garrison 11-23-2008 09:20 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Basing your workouts off of what worked for a world class athlete may not be the best approach.

David Wood 11-23-2008 10:51 PM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Those were so fundamental, I suspect that they would "work" (in the sense of producing improvement) in almost anyone. I have an earlier edition than the one pictured in the link above; that edition was really focused on the "young athlete" (say, 13-15 years old) and had pretty sensible advice . . . sprints, squats, pushups, situps, and working your *** off.

Herschel had some degree of genetic giftedness, although it may not have been apparent at that age. He probably was going to be pretty good no matter what he did . . . but this program is unlikely to do anyone much harm.

Aaron C Bennett 11-24-2008 05:41 AM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Phillip Garrisonq (Post 454079)
Basing your workouts off of what worked for a world class athlete may not be the best approach.

Are you being factious? It's hard to tell someone's tone on the internet.
When I was training for the Olympics (Alpine skiing-slalom for Nagano), I trained like the world class athletes. I don't see why I wouldn't train like one if I'd like to be one. Granted, I'm not devoting the amount of time to my training now as I did a decade ago. From what I've read about this book, it is something I can still do now that I have other responsiblities in my life and don't have access to the equipment and trainers I used to use at the University of Michigan.

I do have a few of Ross' books, and have gained a lot from them. I just saw the Walker book on eBay mixed in with a grab-bag of fitness books for less than I've ever seen it alone, so I snapped it up.

Ed Haywood 11-24-2008 06:39 AM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Herschel's genetic giftedness was readily apparent at that age. I went to high school in Georgia at the same time he did, and he was a legend by the time he was a junior. He was so much bigger, faster, stronger, and better than the other kids on the field. Imagine a high school junior with NFL size and speed. In his senior year, he won the HS state championship 200m sprint AND the shot put. He weighed 220 pounds. Scary.

But there are lots of high schoolers who mature early, and lots of gifted athletes who fizzle out. What set Herschel apart and made him great was his work ethic. Even in high school he was famous for his hard work and old school training methods. He came from a modest family and a poor school without access to expensive training equipment, so he made a virtue out of neccessity. For instance, in high school he attributed his speed to doing sprint workouts while dragging a cement-filled tire behind him. I would argue his work ethic and approach to fitness are very much "crossfit".

David Meverden 11-24-2008 10:06 AM

Re: Herschel Walker's Basic Training
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Aaron C Bennett (Post 454172)
Are you being factious? It's hard to tell someone's tone on the internet.
When I was training for the Olympics (Alpine skiing-slalom for Nagano), I trained like the world class athletes. I don't see why I wouldn't train like one if I'd like to be one. Granted, I'm not devoting the amount of time to my training now as I did a decade ago. From what I've read about this book, it is something I can still do now that I have other responsiblities in my life and don't have access to the equipment and trainers I used to use at the University of Michigan.

I do have a few of Ross' books, and have gained a lot from them. I just saw the Walker book on eBay mixed in with a grab-bag of fitness books for less than I've ever seen it alone, so I snapped it up.

I'm confident he was being serious. His point was that relative novices will get better training value from focusing on the basics. I firmly believe this also; that many gym goers get sidetracked doing all sorts of crazy exercises they read in a magazine or saw on "the ultimate fighter" when they would get more benefit by focusing on more fundamental movements. The easiest example is Rippetoe's Starting Strength program (the beginner one) that is so popular around here. It won't help elite athletes make gains, but most people around who haven't done serious strength training are expected to get better results than from a much more complex program.

Of course this doesn't take into account your own training level. If you were an Olympic Calibre athlete then people around here probably aren't giving you a wide enough berth, hehe.


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