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-   -   Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM (https://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=86218)

Coach 08-02-2015 09:31 AM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
Ironically, while [URL="https://twitter.com/K_S_Institute/status/627149511769595904"]Gatorade’s Korey Stringer Institute was Tweeting on the subject of medical services at The CrossFit Games[/URL], I was on Capitol Hill speaking to committee staffers about regular injury and death from EAHE arising from the fraudulent and perverted science spawned by collaboration of Gatorade, and its other institute, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, and their puppet, the American College of Sports Medicine.

Gatorade/GSSI, and the ACSM are individually and collectively unique in that no other organizations or individuals have caused acute and deadly trauma in athletes with health guidelines. You’d need a gun to do what these “fellows” have done with “science”. (Notice, I said acute. More to follow on their contributions to chronic disease. Here you’d need bombs.)

I have three ideas for the Korey Stringer Institute, and their founding partner, Gatorade. (If anyone from the other founding partner is paying attention, then follow my claim that your partner has needlessly hurt athletes.)

1. Why not rename the institute after one of the football players your founder’s guidelines have killed? Zyrees Oliver, Walker Wilbanks, Patrick Allen, ...

2. Promote the statement of the [URL="http://journals.lww.com/cjsportsmed/Fulltext/2015/07000/Statement_of_the_Third_International.2.aspx"]Third International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference[/URL] sponsored by CrossFit, Inc. This has been published by the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine and [URL="http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/07/14/bjsports-2015-095004.extract"]The British Journal of Sports Medicine[/URL]. What came from that conference was an elegant scientific consensus advising to drink when you’re thirsty and don’t when you’re not. Amazing how much work it took to clean up your mess on this single topic.

3. It’s time to look at the role of hyponatremia-induced intracranial pressure on the transmission and propagation of collision energy in football players. Have tainted hydration guidelines been a cause of traumatic brain injury? Let’s be a real institute and do some real science.

Eager to help,

Greg Glassman, CEO
CrossFit Inc.

Christopher Morris 08-03-2015 01:39 PM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
You're saying Gatorade has hurt athletes, and now they're saying CrossFit has hurt athletes.

[QUOTE=Russell Greene;1252244]Gatorade has finally relented and [URL="Gatorade's involvement in exercise science twists scientific research to sell more product.
2. Stay Safe: Drink to Thirst
Instead of following extreme hydration guidelines such as the American College of Sports Medicine's "the maximal amount that can be tolerated," or Gatorade's "at least 40 oz. of fluid an hour," etc., athletes should just drink ad libitum, or when they feel like it. Humans possess an effective mechanism for preventing hyper-hydration and severe dehydration: thirst.
http://therussells.crossfit.com/2015/05/04/gatorades-hydration-confessions/"]begun advising athletes to drink "ad libitum," or "to thirst."[/URL]

[/QUOTE]

I wondered if this earlier post had the feeling of "we've arrived, and the work is done." I'm glad to see that CrossFit HQ continues to push and educate about overdrinking.

(I'd love to see an ice bucket challenge - similar to the ALS trend last year - to raised awareness on overhydration.)

RE: KSI tweet

Is there cause for concern after injuries at the 2015 Games, or does the T Nation article exaggerate the lack of medical involvement? Are Games organizers considering the implementation of more preventive medicine at future events, or are those injuries within normal limits?

John Drohan 08-10-2015 09:38 AM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
Looks like Coke is on the offensive. No mention of Crossfit per se, but the article looks like standard deflection techniques...

[url]http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/09/coca-cola-funds-scientists-who-shift-blame-for-obesity-away-from-bad-diets/?_r=0[/url] (WFS)

Russell Greene 08-12-2015 07:35 AM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
John,

The article doesn't mention CrossFit, but those organizations and individuals are closely related to the themes in this thread.

Dr. Steven Blair is a former president of the American College of Sports Medicine. And the Exercise is Medicine program that the article mentions was founded by Coke in partnership with the ACSM.

One cornerstone of the Exercise is Medicine program is fitness licensure, which ACSM and friends are lobbying for. As [URL="http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?p=1255917#post1255917"]Greg Glassman wrote in another thread[/URL],

"Exercise is Medicine is another Coca-Cola initiative that will make it tough—and eventually illegal—to talk about any of this, at least and get paid. When exercise becomes 'medicine,' then pointing out that Coke is poison will be malpractice."

Links above are w/f safe.

Christopher Morris 08-12-2015 10:55 AM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
[QUOTE=Christopher Morris;1255648]Is there cause for concern after injuries at the 2015 Games, or does the T Nation article exaggerate the lack of medical involvement? Are Games organizers considering the implementation of more preventive medicine at future events, or are those injuries within normal limits?[/QUOTE]

I didn't get an answer to my questions, but I recognize it is a sensitive topic. If you say, "Yes, we're going to make changes to prevent injuries," then critics will say, "Ha! CrossFit admits they hurt people." If you say, "No, we're not making changes," then critics will say, "CrossFit is irresponsible!" I'll just look forward to next year to another great sporting event. I wish you and the athletes another great Games season in 2016.

Michael V. Erickson 07-28-2016 12:01 PM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
[URL="http://www.wyff4.com/news/Drinking-too-much-water-may-have-caused-soldier-s-death-at-Ranger-School/40929628"]http://www.wyff4.com/news/Drinking-too-much-water-may-have-caused-soldier-s-death-at-Ranger-School/40929628[/URL]

Christopher Morris 07-29-2017 07:49 AM

Re: Exercise Associated Hyponatremic Encephalopathy, Gatorade and the ACSM
 
The way of thinking is changing.

From CNN:
[url]http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/health/water-during-exercise-davis/index.html[/url] (wfs)

[quote]
Drinking only when thirsty results in better performance than does chugging constantly.
[/quote]

[quote]
If you take in (too) much fluid, sodium levels can become dangerously low. The resulting condition, known as hyponatremia or water intoxication, can cause headaches, vomiting, confusion, seizures and, in some cases, death.
Previously, hyponatremia occurred mainly in slower marathon runners, but it's now showing up among people engaged in activities such as hiking, half-marathons and hot yoga.
[/quote]

[quote]
Striving for pale pee could prompt some people to drink too much, overhydrate themselves and develop hyponatremia.
[/quote]

Also, I was at a week-long boy scout camp this week. Spending a week outdoors can cause dehydration. I walked past one group where the counselors were telling the scouts that they don't have to drink, drink, drink - that they should drink when they are thirsty.


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