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View Full Version : Using Bands for Doorway Pullup bar, safe?


Alicia De Alba
09-10-2012, 06:13 PM
I was wondering if it was safe to use bands with pull up bar that we attach to our doorway?

Example: http://www.pullupbardoorframe.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Doorway-Pull-Up-Bars.jpg

I'll be using black/green bands to start since been awhile since I cross fitted (just had a baby and getting back in the game!).

Michael Loucas
09-10-2012, 07:31 PM
I was wondering if it was safe to use bands with pull up bar that we attach to our doorway?

Example: http://www.pullupbardoorframe.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Doorway-Pull-Up-Bars.jpg

I'll be using black/green bands to start since been awhile since I cross fitted (just had a baby and getting back in the game!).

I don't see why not. It is still just your weight pulling down on the bar. The only difference is less weight being pulled by your arms, and more being pulled by the bands.

Peter Keller
09-10-2012, 08:32 PM
Ahhhh! Run away!

Do not use bands on this type of pullup bar unless you permanently anchor the bar in. This type of pullup bar is held into place by gravity and if you put too much ballistic movement upwards onto the bar, you can easily free the bar from its moorings.

Then you fall and if you're unlucky, the bar hits you on the head once you've hit the ground.

Search youtube for "pull-up bar fail":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCk_qbRHYnc WFS

If you need bands, try a studbar or another type of solidly installed bar.

Michael Loucas
09-10-2012, 08:37 PM
Ahhhh! Run away!

Do not use bands on this type of pullup bar unless you permanently anchor the bar in. This type of pullup bar is held into place by gravity and if you put too much ballistic movement upwards onto the bar, you can easily free the bar from its moorings.

Then you fall and if you're unlucky, the bar hits you on the head once you've hit the ground.

Search youtube for "pull-up bar fail":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCk_qbRHYnc WFS

If you need bands, try a studbar or another type of solidly installed bar.

What do you mean? She didn't say kipping pullups, just pullups. That implies strict so there would be no swaying motion. There would be no more force on the bar than if she were to just hang from it. And it will be all downward force which is what this bar is meant to handle.

Craig Freel
09-11-2012, 07:45 AM
I've done it. Just don't be stupid and you'll be fine. If you're short, use a chair to get into the bands.

Dylan Forbes
09-11-2012, 08:35 AM
Do real pullups and not kipping ones and you should be okay. Check if the bar has a weight rating documented and ensure you're under that. Adding bands shoudnt really make any difference I'd have thought.

Peter Keller
09-11-2012, 08:55 AM
I have personally seen this style of pullup bars fall in use. They are very touchy. YMMV

Peter Keller
09-11-2012, 08:57 AM
What do you mean? She didn't say kipping pullups, just pullups. That implies strict so there would be no swaying motion. There would be no more force on the bar than if she were to just hang from it. And it will be all downward force which is what this bar is meant to handle.

The pullup bands put upward force on the bar.

Matt Thomas
09-11-2012, 11:30 AM
Sometimes those bars come with a bracket that attaches to the frame that is meant to keep it from sliding off the door frame. Check if yours does. This would help you avoid any issues.

Michael Loucas
09-11-2012, 12:54 PM
The pullup bands put upward force on the bar.

How are they applying upward force on the bar? They apply upward force on your feet, and downward force on the bar.

Peter Keller
09-11-2012, 01:14 PM
At the top of the pullup (where the trainee is strongest), the extra support and momentum provided by the bands can result in upward force put on the bar. Upward force put onto this type of pullup bar is undesirable at best and dangerous at worst.

To take a step back from this discussion, the OP can either get a pullup bar setup where the pullup bar cannot fail. Or, she can get a setup where the pullup bar might fail.

I choose and advise to get the setup where failure is not possible.

Mike Haas
09-13-2012, 12:11 PM
I use one of those with a band, no problem. Of course, I don't need to jump up to grab the bar like the junior gymnast in the video.

Those units come with a Z-shaped metal clip that jams in behind the door head trim to capture the bar in place and prevent it from jumping free unintentionally. Cheesy though they are, it works. I'd bet folding-money that the bar in that video was not using the Z-clip.

Mauricio Leal
09-13-2012, 04:16 PM
A band doesn't provide upward force but it certainly does provide lateral force, as so often during hard reps people pike at the hips and the band comes forward diagonally away from the bar, which torques on the bar. This isn't necessarily failure-inducing as it could torque it in the direction of stability, i.e. push the frame brace harder against the frame, securing it further, except that generally this torque is variable/oscillating with the hips piking and un-piking and can thus induce some swinging motion.

In short, if you're going to use a band I'd just be very careful, but of course you know you shouldn't be doing anything dynamic on those kinds of bars anyway.

Tom Taylor
09-13-2012, 09:05 PM
Mauricio,

Thank you for saving me much typing. While the band does increase the force/velocity of the assent this is counterbalanced by the users weight. I have used this exact set up for years for assisted dead hang pull-ups with no problem. If we are talking about kipping pull-ups well, this is not at all what the bar is designed for, band assissted or not.
Keep the hips and shoulders in check and skip the kip on this style bar and you'll be fine.

Tom