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Cleve Chia
05-29-2012, 11:02 PM
I have been suffering from ocasional aching knee pain inside the patella wven when doing proper air squat or flexion of the knee at 100 degrees or lesser. It gets more frequent after weighted squatting exercises.

The pain actually is able to be contained or reduced effectively after mobility exercises with stretching and trigger point rolling of the quadriceps, adductors and abductors. A pain relief is most felt after the mobility work, but it returns the next day especially after sleep.

Recently it was aggravated, so I went to see a orthopaedic and took a MRI as recommended:

Conclusion from MRI report:
"Small amount of oedema overlying the medial tibial, patellotibial ligament is demonstrated. No focal full thickness cartilage ulceration or change in cartilage morphology is demonstrated at the patellofemoral joint.

Medial meniscus is intact.

2mm radial tear at the junction of the anterior horn and body of the lateral meniscus."

The doc has advised me to rest and not to do squats or lunges type of movement for three months. He has prescribed me on glucosamine and collagen in the meantime to help in recovery.

I would appreciate any opinions or advices on how can I move forward from here.

Sean Rockett
05-31-2012, 10:02 PM
I have been suffering from ocasional aching knee pain inside the patella wven when doing proper air squat or flexion of the knee at 100 degrees or lesser. It gets more frequent after weighted squatting exercises.

The pain actually is able to be contained or reduced effectively after mobility exercises with stretching and trigger point rolling of the quadriceps, adductors and abductors. A pain relief is most felt after the mobility work, but it returns the next day especially after sleep.

Recently it was aggravated, so I went to see a orthopaedic and took a MRI as recommended:

Conclusion from MRI report:


The doc has advised me to rest and not to do squats or lunges type of movement for three months. He has prescribed me on glucosamine and collagen in the meantime to help in recovery.

I would appreciate any opinions or advices on how can I move forward from here.

Looks like patellar tendonitis from the report, go to my blog 321GoMD.com under tendonitis.

Cleve Chia
06-10-2012, 05:50 AM
Looks like patellar tendonitis from the report, go to my blog 321GoMD.com under tendonitis.

Thanks for you response Sean. You have an informative blog there :) Funny thing is that I have never had such a problem when I was active running regularly with marathons years back. And now, this problem just crops up when I am more sedentary.

At present, I'm very conservative on any exercises revolving around the knee joint now.

Michael McMahon
06-10-2012, 09:11 PM
Wouldn't the report from the MRI that indicated a radial tear at the junction of the anterior horn and body of the lateral meniscus indicate a torn meniscus as the source of the pain? Wouldn't a tear in the anterior horn lead to the pain behind the patella?

Sean Rockett
06-10-2012, 09:37 PM
Wouldn't the report from the MRI that indicated a radial tear at the junction of the anterior horn and body of the lateral meniscus indicate a torn meniscus as the source of the pain? Wouldn't a tear in the anterior horn lead to the pain behind the patella?

If it is not better would return to your MD, physical exam can distinguish between meniscal tear and patellar pain. Typically if your doc thought there was meniscal tear seen on MRI and not just an overread by a radiologist, surgery would be considered.

Steven Low
06-14-2012, 05:18 PM
Wouldn't the report from the MRI that indicated a radial tear at the junction of the anterior horn and body of the lateral meniscus indicate a torn meniscus as the source of the pain? Wouldn't a tear in the anterior horn lead to the pain behind the patella?

As Sean said, there are exam techniques to distinguish patellar pain from meniscus pain.

Meniscus tears can be asymtomatic as well...

Though generally speaking meniscus tears will destabilize the knee to some extent which can lead to pain within the lateral compartment (lateral meniscus) or it can alter mechanics to cause patellar issues.

Though the former is usually more common than the latter...

Ehhh, I'm kinda curious as to what the physical exam picked up the first time.

Cleve Chia
06-15-2012, 01:44 AM
As Sean said, there are exam techniques to distinguish patellar pain from meniscus pain.

Meniscus tears can be asymtomatic as well...

Though generally speaking meniscus tears will destabilize the knee to some extent which can lead to pain within the lateral compartment (lateral meniscus) or it can alter mechanics to cause patellar issues.

Though the former is usually more common than the latter...

Ehhh, I'm kinda curious as to what the physical exam picked up the first time.

Before the MRI, orthopedic was unable to deduce an exact diagnosis. Therefore he advised me to undertake the MRI, so that the root of the problem can be surfaced especially this condition has been around for a year. I was supportive of this despite the cost of the MRI because I genuinely wanted to solve the problem.