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View Full Version : Can someone explain the science behind kinesio taping


Sara Lynn Miller
05-26-2012, 09:12 PM
I am especially interested in how kinesio taping can protect the lumbar and discs at that level from injury during heavy load.

Well, and the general science behind how it works. I am one of those skeptics.

Brian Strump
05-28-2012, 05:42 PM
Why don't you email Rock Tape? Tell them what you're looking for. That should help.

Megan Zetter
05-29-2012, 06:43 AM
Or click here: http://www.kinesiotaping.com/global/corporation/about/kinesio-taping-method.html and or do a Google search. There is a lot of info available on the web.

Katherine Derbyshire
05-29-2012, 01:03 PM
From what I see on their web page, it doesn't. It's a rehab technique, not intended for that application.

But I do not speak for the company.

Katherine

Jon Gray
05-29-2012, 02:19 PM
It seems suspect to me. You're really only bolstering the skin, which as we all know glides over the muscles. I'm sure that there must be an intense proprioceptive signal that the skin sends to the body though.

Brian Strump
05-29-2012, 08:05 PM
There is also the benefit of increasing circulation.

I think a big reason why people think it may be suspect is because they think it looks cool, order some poor quality online(or good quality stuff), but do not know how to properly use it.

It's alot more than just putting take where it hurts.

I can't offer much in research to it, but I've seen it do some pretty dramatic things for swelling in an extremity.

Megan Zetter
05-29-2012, 09:12 PM
From what I see on their web page, it doesn't. It's a rehab technique, not intended for that application.

But I do not speak for the company.

Katherine

In regard to lumbar disc injury, I don't see it being directly beneficial, but rather, it could serve as a great support to the lumbar paraspinals if applied properly.

Does k-tape cure people? Hardly. However, when used appropriately, it can be a useful therapeutic tool.

Sara Lynn Miller
05-30-2012, 08:28 AM
I brought this up because I am seeing these video clips from Regionals and the athletes are taping the hell out of their backs and shoulders as if it were a preventative measure. Especially in the WODs involving cleans and snatches.

The load on the bar is going to win, not the taping.

Brian Strump
05-30-2012, 11:59 AM
Because it looks cool! Ditto for all the ankle and arm sleeves you see guys wear now.
:shrug:

Neither cures anything, but can be used to "lock in" any therapeutic changes.

Oh, and sponsorships help too. I'd wrap myself up in it, if it would pay for a trip to Cali.


I brought this up because I am seeing these video clips from Regionals and the athletes are taping the hell out of their backs and shoulders as if it were a preventative measure. Especially in the WODs involving cleans and snatches.

The load on the bar is going to win, not the taping.

Megan Zetter
05-31-2012, 07:25 AM
I brought this up because I am seeing these video clips from Regionals and the athletes are taping the hell out of their backs and shoulders as if it were a preventative measure. Especially in the WODs involving cleans and snatches.

The load on the bar is going to win, not the taping.

K-tape gives proprioceptive feed back, which some may say helps prevent injury. And if applied correctly it can be supportive. Ultimately though, if your technique sucks you will get hurt.

Shawn Bellon
05-31-2012, 04:08 PM
From what I see on their web page, it doesn't. It's a rehab technique, not intended for that application.

But I do not speak for the company.

Katherine

That is my understanding as well.

Jon Gray
08-08-2012, 12:34 PM
I am especially interested in how kinesio taping can protect the lumbar and discs at that level from injury during heavy load.

Well, and the general science behind how it works. I am one of those skeptics.

It doesn't "protect" anything. It's just a reminder of ROM.

Joshua Ruwet
08-08-2012, 01:36 PM
Because it looks cool! Ditto for all the ankle and arm sleeves you see guys wear now.

Are you talking about compression sleeves? There's mixed data out there, but not enough time or studies to conclusively say it's beneficial in preventing injury or in promoting healing. Regardless, I could care less so as long as I feel better.

Also could care less about looking cool (which is entirely subjective)...but hooray for Placebo effect! If I feel better, I don't give rats butt about the science.

Sean Rockett
08-08-2012, 08:13 PM
Are you talking about compression sleeves? There's mixed data out there, but not enough time or studies to conclusively say it's beneficial in preventing injury or in promoting healing. Regardless, I could care less so as long as I feel better.

Also could care less about looking cool (which is entirely subjective)...but hooray for Placebo effect! If I feel better, I don't give rats butt about the science.

I remember this study from a little bit ago talking about compression knee sleeves helping with proprioception (or the ability to recognize and place your leg in space which typically decreases with fatigue) in fatigued legs vs nonfatigued legs. This was a real scientific study with a control and intervention limbs in Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine stduying military personnel. My guess is the tape works in the same fashion as I do have patients who say they notice a difference with it. Conclusions are here:

CONCLUSIONS: Bracing is helpful in individuals with a poor baseline proprioceptive acuity in both fatigued and nonfatigued states. Subjects with a good joint position sense benefit from bracing only when in a fatigued state. The present findings suggest a rationale for using neoprene knee sleeves as a preventative measure or treatment in subjects and patients to enhance proprioceptive acuity in a fatigued state. Classification into "poor" and "good" proprioceptive acuity is only relevant in the nonfatigued condition.

Brian Strump
08-08-2012, 09:19 PM
I agree 100%. But some people wear the stuff and have no idea why. Or they purchase the tape online, but have no instruction on how to apply the tape, and for what reason. You apply it differently depending on the end goal(inc. proprioception, help with muscle strain, reduce swelling/inflammation)

A few guys from our affiliate are going to show up to the next competition and wrap ourselves up in some duct tape instead.


Are you talking about compression sleeves? There's mixed data out there, but not enough time or studies to conclusively say it's beneficial in preventing injury or in promoting healing. Regardless, I could care less so as long as I feel better.

Also could care less about looking cool (which is entirely subjective)...but hooray for Placebo effect! If I feel better, I don't give rats butt about the science.

Brett Dartt
08-09-2012, 12:24 AM
I used k tape for a shoulder impingement when i tore my subscapular. I applied it like their videos showed and it was like magic. Went from not being able to pick up a cup of coffee to getting almost full range of motion with little to no pain.

Donald Lee
08-12-2012, 05:49 PM
Here's an article that talks about the theories behind kinesiotaping and some of the studies done on it:

http://www.bettermovement.org/2011/how-does-kinseotape-work/ (WFS)