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Bob Herald
04-28-2012, 04:11 PM
Anyone have any info on this?

Do us athletes get more injuries as we age and why?

I weight train and compete and train in contact sports (boxing , muay Thai, Brazilian jiujitsu) I'm healthy and athletic. I'm also 35.

The past year or do I've had a multitude of minor injuries mostly incurred during jiujitsu training. But I seem to be getting injuries relating to my muscles.

6 mos ago I tore my gastrocnemius in my calf sprinting. 2 weeks ago pulled the gastrocnemius In the other calf doing jiujitsu . And today pulled or tore one of my oblique abdominal muscles doing jiujitsu.

I did a pretty tough core workout before jiujitsu , which is probably what precipitated the injury. Bad idea.

Brian Strump
04-28-2012, 06:38 PM
Three things to consider,

-Most injuries are of the repetitive trauma in nature. Ergo, the older we get the more likely to experience an injury.

-The greatest predictor of new injury, is previous injury. So the longer you're alive, longer time you have to get injured.

-As you get older, you heal slower. Perhaps as you age, you start taking various medications for other health issues that decrease how well tissues heal.

Steven Low
04-28-2012, 06:46 PM
In addition to what Brian said, one really good PT I met online Shon Grosse (http://shongrosse.com/strength-and-conditioning/) recommends much longer warm ups, especially as you age

The Warm Up Equation: 20 minutes minimum, plus 10 minutes per decade after age 20. Pretty simple here: if you are 21 years old, your warm up should be 20 minutes in duration, progressively increasing in intensity every 5 minutes. If you are 30 years old, you should spend 30 minutes progressively, steadily building up before the days’ hardest work is performed.

I can already hear it from the masses: “…but I only have an hour at the gym-including a shower!” Well, my idea of a warm up is more than likely harder than your current training and is probably more shower worthy! Warm up should prepare you for hard work, and the only way to do this is to stay just on the other side of “hard” as you warm up. Minute 30 should look vastly different from minute 10 and should appear to the outsider to be legitimate training, which of course it is. Once you finish that last minute, the rest of your training session should have you moving like a bullet train near top speed.

So yeah... that's a general good rule to prescribe to

Sean Rockett
04-29-2012, 05:12 PM
Also as we age our connective tissues, tendons, cartilage, etc. start to dehydrate and lose some of their innate elasticity, thus pulling ripping or tearing things that would not have happened in our teens or twenties.

Hollie Jacobs
05-16-2012, 08:47 AM
I believe that age also affects the amount of time an injury heals.

Steve Edney
05-18-2012, 05:07 PM
Also as we age our connective tissues, tendons, cartilage, etc. start to dehydrate and lose some of their innate elasticity, thus pulling ripping or tearing things that would not have happened in our teens or twenties.

So aside from warming up longer, are there other things us older (age 49) individuals can do to help prevent ripping and tearing things?

Sean Rockett
05-19-2012, 01:32 PM
Especially in CrossFit we have to be careful not to let our minds get in the way of our bodies. That is check the ego at the door and enjoy the workout that you are doing in a comfortable weight frame and rep scheme. Don't decide to deadlift 60 lbs more because you are working out with others in your group who have done that and are 20 years younger than you. Don't decide to redo a workout a day later with 100 reps of a tough move for you. Careful with overhead weight that are too heavy. That said, it is OK to unleash the Dogs of Fury every so often.:)

Troy Peterson
05-21-2012, 02:07 PM
Especially in CrossFit we have to be careful not to let our minds get in the way of our bodies. That is check the ego at the door and enjoy the workout that you are doing in a comfortable weight frame and rep scheme. Don't decide to deadlift 60 lbs more because you are working out with others in your group who have done that and are 20 years younger than you. Don't decide to redo a workout a day later with 100 reps of a tough move for you. Careful with overhead weight that are too heavy. That said, it is OK to unleash the Dogs of Fury every so often.:)

I like this and try to prescribe to this line of thinking. I'm trying to get better than yesterday and am having some success doing so despite being older and recovering from some injuries.

An advantage to being older/more experienced is we should know our bodies better and that can help avoid problematic injuries. Training smarter is necessary.

My Dogs of Fury analogy: while working at a golf course a couple decades ago we drove around the utility cart (gas engine). You could take a golf pencil and prop open the governor in the engine which would really let the cart move FAST.

Crossfit is geared towards "opening the governor" at all times. I don't do that daily. But there are times when I do open up the governor because it's fun (and if it involves movments that I'm not injured nor are as likely to cause injury). Just can't run fast every time.

Helen M Brennan
05-26-2012, 09:20 PM
i have found that being in the older category that my body is less forgiving of my stupidity than when i was 20. I now do a pre warm up warm up which really helps.

As we age it is in our best interests to become more aware of our own bodies and listen to the messages we get. Thus serious injury can usually be avoided or minimised.


Cheers

h

Steve Edney
05-29-2012, 06:57 PM
i have found that being in the older category that my body is less forgiving of my stupidity than when i was 20. I now do a pre warm up warm up which really helps.

As we age it is in our best interests to become more aware of our own bodies and listen to the messages we get. Thus serious injury can usually be avoided or minimised.


Cheers

h

I've started getting to class at least 30 mins before the WOD to warm up prior to group warm up. I've also started scaling down, much more than I was, in movements where my form is not strong. My goal, along with improving my fitness, is insuring I get to CF on a consistent basis.