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Brian Zemaitis
05-09-2011, 05:28 AM
Just went to my chiropractor. I have tweaked my upper back and need to get it healthy again. I have been crossfitting for about a year now and love it. Unfortunately, He told me to nix any workout that compresses the back. This pretty much kills any olympic lifting. Any thoughts on how I can continue Crossfit without doing the oly lifts?

Brent Sallee
05-09-2011, 06:51 AM
Did your chiropractor tell you what's responsible for the tweaking of your back? Disc? Articular facet? Muscle strain? Ligament Sprain? I understand this, especially if it's your disc, but that's not a permanent limitation. In addition to that, compression is not limited to the Oly lifts. It includes everything that requires you even hold a weight - deadlift, squat, front squat, farmer walks, etc. If it's disc, then you'll also have to avoid things like sit-ups, toes-to-bar, etc because they increase pressure in the disc significantly.

Your healthcare practitioner should tailor the solution to your needs - not just tell you to quit what you like doing. Sure, a disc pathology and weightlifting don't go great together, but plenty of people work around them after something like physical therapy.

Veronica Mitchell
05-09-2011, 11:30 AM
Just got back from the Chiropractor myself. After two weeks of inactivity I'm ready to go but he told me the same thing: No oly style lifting. I'm very frustrated.
He told me I could walk briskly for the next 2 weeks while we treat the problem (which is in my lower back). So no advice really, just sympathy.

Brent Sallee
05-09-2011, 07:46 PM
Just got back from the Chiropractor myself. After two weeks of inactivity I'm ready to go but he told me the same thing: No oly style lifting. I'm very frustrated.
He told me I could walk briskly for the next 2 weeks while we treat the problem (which is in my lower back). So no advice really, just sympathy.

This is why chiropractors sometimes are so frustrating. They have a very passive approach to fixing problems. Therapeutic exercises can help address the original contributing factors, improve core stability to avoid spikes in intradiscal pressure, etc. Honestly, I'd contemplate visiting someone else. Manipulation alone is not right for disc injuries.

Dave Gendron
05-10-2011, 06:34 PM
Just to chime in here as a chriopractor, I too am frustrated by alot of bad care and advice doled out by other chiros. But unfortunately, the type of advice is not limited to chiros as there are plenty of physios, and even more MDs who dole out this advice as well. It is very difficult as a practitioner on a message board to determine what is what. Both of these chiros might be right in what they are advising, but too me it sounds odd as well. Disc pathology in the upper back is pretty rare and most likely the source of the back pain is not discogenic. Likely the source of the problem is mechanical (a combination between the joints and musculature and with some decent therapy and rehab should be fine to work through.

As a general rule, and this is only my opinion, when looking for a good chriopractor to see I would stay away from ones that do onsite xrays, anyone trying to get you to sign a contract and anyone who just "cracks" your back and does nothing more. Sorry if I'm offending anyone, but that is a very honest answer. However, chiropractors is general are not all bad and many have great success working with very high level athletes and keeping them in the activity/sport. Whenever I have been traveling and have run into trouble, I go to the ART website (active release technique) and find a chiropractor that way. You are guaranteed at least that the practitioner is going to give you more than a simple crack and hopefully they will have a here're understanding of the more complex involvement between the joints and musculature!

So that would be my advice to both people in this thread. A chriopractor could likely help you get through your issue, just perhaps not the ones you're currently seeing.

Hope this helps.

Dave

Brent Sallee
05-10-2011, 07:08 PM
Just to chime in here as a chriopractor, I too am frustrated by alot of bad care and advice doled out by other chiros. But unfortunately, the type of advice is not limited to chiros as there are plenty of physios, and even more MDs who dole out this advice as well. It is very difficult as a practitioner on a message board to determine what is what. Both of these chiros might be right in what they are advising, but too me it sounds odd as well. Disc pathology in the upper back is pretty rare and most likely the source of the back pain is not discogenic. Likely the source of the problem is mechanical (a combination between the joints and musculature and with some decent therapy and rehab should be fine to work through.

As a general rule, and this is only my opinion, when looking for a good chriopractor to see I would stay away from ones that do onsite xrays, anyone trying to get you to sign a contract and anyone who just "cracks" your back and does nothing more. Sorry if I'm offending anyone, but that is a very honest answer. However, chiropractors is general are not all bad and many have great success working with very high level athletes and keeping them in the activity/sport. Whenever I have been traveling and have run into trouble, I go to the ART website (active release technique) and find a chiropractor that way. You are guaranteed at least that the practitioner is going to give you more than a simple crack and hopefully they will have a here're understanding of the more complex involvement between the joints and musculature!

So that would be my advice to both people in this thread. A chriopractor could likely help you get through your issue, just perhaps not the ones you're currently seeing.

Hope this helps.

Dave

This is the exact sentiment I share. I wish that there was both a test of knowledge (as there currently is) and a random test of clinical techniques and evaluation that was required by each domain's main organization. Manipulation is a useful tool, but is just that - one technique. It needs to be supplemented with other techniques to address both the symptoms and the cause for good. And I apologize if what I said sounded portrayed chiropractics in a negative light: I've been having more and more trouble finding good chiropractors to have a dialogue with.

Veronica Mitchell
05-17-2011, 09:06 AM
Just to chime in here as a chriopractor, I too am frustrated by alot of bad care and advice doled out by other chiros. But unfortunately, the type of advice is not limited to chiros as there are plenty of physios, and even more MDs who dole out this advice as well. It is very difficult as a practitioner on a message board to determine what is what. Both of these chiros might be right in what they are advising, but too me it sounds odd as well. Disc pathology in the upper back is pretty rare and most likely the source of the back pain is not discogenic. Likely the source of the problem is mechanical (a combination between the joints and musculature and with some decent therapy and rehab should be fine to work through.

As a general rule, and this is only my opinion, when looking for a good chriopractor to see I would stay away from ones that do onsite xrays, anyone trying to get you to sign a contract and anyone who just "cracks" your back and does nothing more. Sorry if I'm offending anyone, but that is a very honest answer. However, chiropractors is general are not all bad and many have great success working with very high level athletes and keeping them in the activity/sport. Whenever I have been traveling and have run into trouble, I go to the ART website (active release technique) and find a chiropractor that way. You are guaranteed at least that the practitioner is going to give you more than a simple crack and hopefully they will have a here're understanding of the more complex involvement between the joints and musculature!

So that would be my advice to both people in this thread. A chriopractor could likely help you get through your issue, just perhaps not the ones you're currently seeing.

Hope this helps.

Dave

I'm interested to know why the onsite xray is a bad thing? I'm improving a lot, but if I can add some exercise to my day I would feel better even if it were minor stretching/recuperative exercise.

Tamara Cohen
05-17-2011, 09:13 AM
While I have used a chiropractor for manual therapy off and on for the past two years, I have had much more success in rehabbing various issues, including bulging discs in my neck, by seeing an orthopedic surgeon and a physical therapist who specialize in working with athletes. My PT is a CSCS who has his USAW cert. When your health care provider actually knows something about lifting a barbell, it helps.

Kevin Bean
05-17-2011, 04:07 PM
I'm with Tamara, go see a physical therapist that deals with athletes.

Brian Strump
05-18-2011, 04:55 AM
I'm confused about the x-ray thing, but do share the rest of the sentiments.

The problem is that most doctors(DC, PT, MD, DO) work mostly with the general public where telling them to NOT exercise is a blessing for most of them to hear. You need to research where you are going. I've been to all of the above, so are impressive other you wonder how they still can be licensed. Find one that works with athletes at any level, has other sports certifications(FMS, SFMA), or includes other techniques(soft tissue, laser), and promotes rehab as part of the protocol and you may have just found the right doctor for you....Chiro, PT, whatever. Hell, I've even met some massage therapist than I would trust to help me with a musculoskeletal problem than a doctor!

Scott Walters
05-20-2011, 10:16 PM
As a chiro too, I have to agree with most of the sentiments above too. As with all therapists, it is horses for courses. Most in my area are a "quick fix" type chiro, and their patients obviously love it. For me, however, if we don't help the patients be more effective at what they do, and prevent more injuries down the road, we have not helped too much. That's why rehabilitation, in my opinion is so important. To do that you need knowledge and skill, so have to be willing to pay the time and money to do that.

It's why I love crossfit aths in the practice, most of them will at least do the homework, and often ask for more, where many others have trouble taking responsibility for their own health.

As for not lifting, without knowing your case I couldn't comment, but in my experience I spend a lot more time asking people in the general public to do more not less!