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View Full Version : Plantar fasciitis - Strassburg sock


Doug Lantz
04-26-2011, 12:35 PM
I've been living with this for months, it gets better and worse but was never bad enough for me to really get motivated to treat it.

I cut back squatting to once a week, I believe the combination of walking around during and after workous wearing my weightlifting shoes and the stretch of the fascia when squatting were major contributors.
Front squats (thrusters) seemed to aggravate it the most.

I saw this sock suggested in another PF thread and decided to try it.

I woke up today got out of bed and took a few steps and for the first in all those months it was pain free.

Now I'm ****ed off I waited so long to try it.

Brent Sallee
04-26-2011, 04:04 PM
I've been living with this for months, it gets better and worse but was never bad enough for me to really get motivated to treat it.

I cut back squatting to once a week, I believe the combination of walking around during and after workous wearing my weightlifting shoes and the stretch of the fascia when squatting were major contributors.
Front squats (thrusters) seemed to aggravate it the most.

I saw this sock suggested in another PF thread and decided to try it.

I woke up today got out of bed and took a few steps and for the first in all those months it was pain free.

Now I'm ****ed off I waited so long to try it.

Ehhh, the sock likely didn't treat the actual problem, but alleviated the morning swelling that's associated with plantar fasciitis. Your fascia is likely still symptomatic and you'll continue to feel it as you resume your activities. If you're serious about getting rid of it once and for all, you should probably visit a physical therapist. Many can fit you for orthotics (if you have an ankle alignment issue) or figure out why your plantar fascia is symptomatic (most frequently caused by compensating for a lack of dorsiflexion).

Doug Lantz
04-27-2011, 01:43 PM
Brett, thanks for your reply.

Discomfort did return over the course of the day but at about half the level of before.

I wore the sock last night, had moderate discomfort this AM that quickly reduced to mild discomfort.

I deadlifted and did 30 power cleans in weightlifting shoes last night, the landing on the PC's should have caused me more discomfort last night and this AM than what I got.

I Googled "compensating for a lack of dorsiflexion" and got some hits but am unclear on what the phrase means, please explain further.
I can voluntarily dorsiflex well beyond 90 degrees.

I bought some shoe inserts called Sof Soles, they helped a bit. http://www.sofsole.com/mens/airrorthotic (WFS)

I'm reluctant to spend the cashola for custom made orthotics, what results can I realistically expect ?

http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&hl=en&biw=1280&bih=709&source=hp&q=compensating+for+a+lack+of+dorsiflexion&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=4491926377f44006 (probably WFS)

Melody Glasgow
04-27-2011, 03:35 PM
I recommend you follow Steven Low's advice on your PF. He helped me get rid of mine:

http://www.eatmoveimprove.com/2009/11/shoes-sitting-and-lower-body-dysfunctions/

wfs

Doug Lantz
04-27-2011, 03:55 PM
Melody,

I checked out that article but am unsure how to apply the advice.

Specifically, what did you do that fixed your PF ?

Mike Mallory
04-27-2011, 04:08 PM
Kelly's got some good advice on that one:

http://www.mobilitywod.com/2010/11/episode-77365-plantar-fasciitis.html (wfs)

Beyond that you probably need a Rolf method practitioner or an NMT or someone else with similar training in bodywork to open up the tissue that are putting stress on the plantar fascia.

You can get started on that kind of work with the MWOD type of thing, and just opening up the whole lower leg in general, but I would also stress that you need to get evaluated by someone who can more accurately assess what's causing the issue-

Melody Glasgow
04-27-2011, 04:50 PM
I did a bunch of things:

I didn't run (only rowing) until symptoms were gone (several months) and wore wide based, flat shoes (skater shoes) for everything else I was doing.

Nightly rolling with a frozen water bottle.

Warming up my feet before I got out of bed in the morning

Once the symptoms started to get a little better I started the foot drills in Steven's article (which helped quite a bit)

Calf and hamstring stretching and mobility work.

Above all, patience and diligence.

Brent Sallee
04-28-2011, 11:02 PM
I did a bunch of things:

I didn't run (only rowing) until symptoms were gone (several months) and wore wide based, flat shoes (skater shoes) for everything else I was doing.

Nightly rolling with a frozen water bottle.

Warming up my feet before I got out of bed in the morning

Once the symptoms started to get a little better I started the foot drills in Steven's article (which helped quite a bit)

Calf and hamstring stretching and mobility work.

Above all, patience and diligence.

Rolling the plantar fascia is only necessary if it's too short. It could be symptomatic and be of normal or increased length as well, in which case rolling it out/stretching it would be aggravating. This is why it'd be beneficial to visit someone who can actually tell you what's going on. I'd just hate to see you work on it diligently and for things to get worse.

Melody Glasgow
04-29-2011, 10:02 AM
I was always under the impression that the water bottle rolling was to break up scar tissue and reduce inflamation. Is this wrong?

Brent Sallee
04-29-2011, 12:38 PM
I was always under the impression that the water bottle rolling was to break up scar tissue and reduce inflamation. Is this wrong?

It does reduce inflammation, but an ice massage or ice pack can also do that. Typically, rolling is advised to lengthen the tissue. This is great for individuals with tight plantar fascia, but for individuals with normal or increased length plantar fascia, it can actually worsen the problem.

Beau Woods
04-30-2011, 12:00 AM
I have dealt with Plantar Fasciitis for a very long time and tried everything (sleeping in a boot, stability shoes, ultrasound therapy, ice rolling, myofascial release type massage on foot). I was about to get surgery for it when my doctor asked me how well I'd been stretching my gastrocnemius. Once I started stretching it well, problems got a ton better and I didn't have to do any of the other stuff. I've started wearing Nike Free's and Vibram FiveFingers and I really think that has helped too (vice the advice of wearing stability shoes with arch supporting insoles). That's what worked for me, everybody is different...Good luck.

Brent Sallee
04-30-2011, 09:56 AM
I have dealt with Plantar Fasciitis for a very long time and tried everything (sleeping in a boot, stability shoes, ultrasound therapy, ice rolling, myofascial release type massage on foot). I was about to get surgery for it when my doctor asked me how well I'd been stretching my gastrocnemius. Once I started stretching it well, problems got a ton better and I didn't have to do any of the other stuff. I've started wearing Nike Free's and Vibram FiveFingers and I really think that has helped too (vice the advice of wearing stability shoes with arch supporting insoles). That's what worked for me, everybody is different...Good luck.

Interesting. As a physical therapy student, gastroc and soleus length would be the first thing I'd check. Did you see a physical therapist about it or just MDs?