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View Full Version : Hands on Fire! :furious0:


Jake Sterny
06-07-2010, 05:57 PM
I know this is a FAQ but during the past two months I've torn my hands up doing pull ups. On both palms from the third knuckle to the fifth. I can't wear gloves and tape only holds up so long. My girlfriend keeps getting upset with me when my hands look like hamburger meat.So, is there anything I can do for a long term solution to help my hands?

Andrew Schechterly
06-07-2010, 08:34 PM
You mean the 3rd finger to the fifth? Or do you have more knuckles than me? Or am I misunderstanding?

If you don't have one, get a pumice stone and use it every single day. Stand in the shower with warm water for a while 'til they get good and softened up. Then, just grind 'em down.

Skin still peels off my palms but nothing ever rips. If that doesn't help... quit before you rip. "You only fail if you quit" is excusable when it is going to affect your WODs for the rest of the week.

Camille Lore
06-08-2010, 07:01 AM
:yeahthat:
Strengthen your grip as your hands are sliding on the bar while you are kipping. Weak grip=sliding hands=tears.

Casey Raiford
06-08-2010, 07:10 AM
We borrowed this excellent article on hands and calluses from CF Virtuosity:

http://crossfitfortmeade.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/digital-first-aid/ (WFS)

GREAT source of info on all the options for dealing with the challenges of CF hand issues.

David Meverden
06-10-2010, 05:58 PM
Also, a good thread on this is located here:
http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=35341 (WFS, except for bloody hands)

In that thread I said the following:

Those kind of rips are definitely NOT something you just have to learn to live with.

You guys need to talk to some gymnasts! My gymnastic experience seems to have put me way ahead of the crossfitters I've been meeting these days when it comes to preventing rips.

For those who don't know, your hands tear because a callus builds up on your hand and this thick stiff layer of skin then gets "caught" on the bar by frictional forces and is torn away from the weaker underlying layer.

The key to preventing the skin from tearing away is to just not have that thick callus layer on the surface. People have mentioned pumace stones and this will certainly work if you stay at it long enough (as anthony said, most people probably don't grind enough) but what I find works great is a razor blade or sharp knife. You use it to basically shave off the callus whenever it starts to build up. It's hard to describe how to do it just right, but it's not hard to figure out. Unless the blade is crazy ridiculous sharp it will easily shave off the thick callus, but won't easily dig into the skin below.

Hopefully this helps! Oh, and here's a link with some decent info if you don't want to take my word for it or want info on treating the rips you DO get. http://www.wikihow.com/Take-Care-of-and-Prevent-a-Rip-in-Gymnastics (WFS)

Another note: if you get rips in the middle of your palm then you need to change how you are gripping the bar. Basically you need to grab it more with your fingers so that the skin fold that is at the very top of the palm (just below the fingers) is below the bar, not above it. That description might be a little confusing. Let me know if it makes sense. Anyone have some pictures to demonstrate this?

Steven Low
06-12-2010, 06:03 PM
Also, a good thread on this is located here:
http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=35341 (WFS, except for bloody hands)

In that thread I said the following:



Another note: if you get rips in the middle of your palm then you need to change how you are gripping the bar. Basically you need to grab it more with your fingers so that the skin fold that is at the very top of the palm (just below the fingers) is below the bar, not above it. That description might be a little confusing. Let me know if it makes sense. Anyone have some pictures to demonstrate this?
Here are my opinions on the matter wfs
http://www.board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=58657

But what David is saying here is what I do advocate. You need a more "finger" grip than palming the bar.