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Old 05-08-2006, 07:58 PM   #1
Jeff Kolehmainen
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Sounds like an excuse already...

I'm looking for some opinions on a good way to get started on a weight loss plan, but lack alot of time to prep meals. I am 5'9" and 208lbs and would like to get down to 185-190 ideally. A little background so maybe someone in my situation can give me some advice. 33 years old, married, 3 kids (all under 5), a high school teacher with a fair amount of take home work, WODs happen at 8 or 9 after the kids are in bed, rock/ice climb any chance I get, vegetarian (although I have started eating fish the past year or so).

Is there a simple version of the Zone to get started, or is there something else to look into. Thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 05-08-2006, 11:02 PM   #2
benjamin lankow
 
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Jeff,

As a full-time student, I can really understand your time considerations regarding food prep. As a Single, I can't comment on how to incorporate a diet into family life, but here are some simple suggestions that helped me get started with the Zone:
While reading Mastering The Zone and CFJ #21, start establishing good dietary patterns by following Coach's simple advice:
"Eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. Keep intake to levels that will support exercise but not body fat."
After a couple of weeks, you've finished your assigned bedtime reading, and are already accustomed to eating the types of food recommended in the Zone. Then you can start adjusting/measuring proportions, which comes easier than you'd think. Experiment with quick/easy meal combinations and keep a list of the ones that work well. In a couple more weeks, you'll have the proportions so dialed in that you can "block" out food by eye wherever you are.
Start slow, establish good (long-lasting) patterns, and use the resources and links available all over this site, especially the FAQ.

Ben
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Old 05-09-2006, 05:10 AM   #3
Larry Lindenman
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Jeff, you got to prepare something to eat, why not make it good food choices. Have vegetables, a "real protein source (fish, whey protein), a piece of fruit, and a handful of nuts (not peanuts) with every meal, snacks are mini meals. Eat 5 times a day. I ate at a restaurant yesterday and asked for grilled chicken breast with a side of vegetables...keep macadamia nuts in your car (one nut = one block of fat, so you need 4 or 5 nuts) and you have a Zone balanced meal. It's as easy to eat good food as it is to eat crap food, just make sure you are going to the right shelf in the pantry. By the way, I have 2 kids, a 1:10 commute (one way) work tons of overtime, coach football in the fall, teach martial arts and CF, maintain a home and marriage (understanding wife), and manage to eat well. It's a matter of habit and teamwork with your family.
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Old 05-09-2006, 06:17 AM   #4
Chris Jodlowski
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Jeff, your scenario sounds pretty similar to my own. I manage to eat a zone-like diet. Nowhere near as intense as a lot of people here, but in 4 months I've lost 12 lbs of body fat and gained 4 lbs lean mass by changing not necessarily *what* I eat, but *how* I eat (along with the wod). The difference is diet vs. lifestyle and making decisions you can live with.

After my kids go to bed, I spend about 1/2 hour prepping stuff for the next day's meals. You're not really adding any work, just shifting it to a time that's better for you. Scramble some eggs, mix up a stir fry, peel some shrimp. Anything that will take time off of your meal times the next day. Roast a big bag of brocolli w/ sesame oil, garlic & ginger. Little prep, then it sits in the oven for an hour while you work out. Good hot or cold the next day. Fish cooks quickly, so it's on the menu often. Grill chicken 4 or 5 lbs at a time on the weekend and freeze for the week. Boil a dozen Omega 3 eggs (to eat the whole thing) and a dozen cheap white eggs (for just the whites) in one night, put them back in their containers marked "HB." Pour your milk, measure your protein powder, and everything else for a shake into the blender the night before, and package frozen fruit in baggies, so all you have to do in the morning is dump the fruit in and blend.

Prep is the key to everything. If you're making one batch of something, why not make 5 and save some for later? Then if you've got a lot of work to do at home, you can pull some brocolli or spinach, a frozen chicken breast or cooked, peeled frozen shrimp or whatever's already done out of the box and nuke it.
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Old 05-09-2006, 06:48 AM   #5
Patrick O'Neil
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Jeff, what saves me is cooking lots of certain things ahead of time. I'll use chicken as an example for me, but you can apply it to any veggie product. Whenever I have a day off, I cook a huge batch of grilled chicken (5-10 breasts) then eat it through the week. Same can apply to oatmeal, etc. Cook alot when you have time to save time later.

I would think shakes would be good for you. A scoop of protien powder, a cup of fruit, fill with water and eat with nuts. An easy 3 block snack/meal that takes about 2 minutes including clean up and can be done anywhere.

Seems like this would be tough as a vegetarian; won't pretend to have answers for that. I'd die without meat.

Good luck!
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Old 05-09-2006, 11:48 AM   #6
Jeff Kolehmainen
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Thanks for the quick replies... I'll check out that book and start slow while I get my reading done. The big problem will be getting my wife to buy into the foods that I will be eating...
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Old 05-09-2006, 12:26 PM   #7
Tim McFarland
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I'm having a huge problem getting my wife to buy into the Zone, too - which is frustrating because she wants to lose weight, keeps asking me for advice but doesn't like my answers so ignores what I say - rrr.

Anyway, you could try doing a lot of cooking over the weekend. That works pretty well for me, and I have a 3 year old and an infant.
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Old 05-09-2006, 01:46 PM   #8
Paul Findley
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The Zone is pretty simple, mostly adjusting portions, removing "High GI" foods like bread/Flour/Pasta/Sugar. We are doing it for the whole family. There are 6 of us :-) so we are pretty busy too.

Make the investment of time to feed your family well, it's quality time together too. Breakfast for us has become a mad dash, then a sit down meal in the AM.

The other night, one of our 4 year old boys said, "Would you cut up a pear for a snack?", we were happy to hear that.
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Old 05-09-2006, 07:41 PM   #9
Jeff Kolehmainen
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Is the Zone ok and healthy for young ones? I have a 2 1/2, a 5 year old that could take part in it... just wondering if they would be deficient in anything if my meals became theirs also.
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Old 05-09-2006, 08:11 PM   #10
Tony Ferous
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I've very much doubt any deficiency Jeff, carbs are non-essential and I dont think anyone will be harmed by omitting pasta/bread/sugar. Use tubers to up the carbs if required, and use enough high quality fats.

I guess that Barry Sears must have died, otherwise he would have published 'Mastering the zone for children'.


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