CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-20-2012, 04:17 PM   #1
Larry Bruce
Member Larry Bruce is offline
 
Larry Bruce's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Toronto  ON
Posts: 545
Gluten-free doesn't have legs

http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/On-...s-trend-expert (WFS)

Now you know
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 08:50 AM   #2
Alan Siebuhr
Member Alan Siebuhr is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Indio  CA
Posts: 127
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Bruce View Post
Seems to be more of an economic standpoint rather than a nutritional standpoint. And I don't know if I agree with it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 11:13 AM   #3
Kevin Benson
Member Kevin Benson is offline
 
Kevin Benson's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Parker  CO
Posts: 253
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

I think the primary argument is that the expected long-term demand for GF foods is well below the current supply. Unless companies can find a way to increase demand, the market should self-correct and likely go back to the way it was just a few years ago; i.e. little to no GF foods in normal grocery stores, limited selection in "natural" grocery stores, and with the majority of products available online.

It would be interesting to see a nutritional study done on something like this. Absent people with celiac disease or other gluten sensitivities, is it healthier for the average person to substitute gluten-free breads, cereals, etc. for traditional stuff. I think that'll be the test that may help or hurt the GF industry. If they can grow demand by non-celiacs then I think the market can continue to grow.

My sister-in-law talks about trying GF all the time to lose weight, but I have a sneaking suspicion that she weighs 275lbs because her diet is 90% processed/refined carbs, 4% fat, and maybe 1% protein. And her hobbies are watching TV and taking naps. I don't think swapping out her 3 bowls of captain crunch in the morning for a GF substitute is going to yield any meaningful results.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 12:05 PM   #4
Larry Bruce
Member Larry Bruce is offline
 
Larry Bruce's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Toronto  ON
Posts: 545
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Benson View Post
I think the primary argument is that the expected long-term demand for GF foods is well below the current supply. Unless companies can find a way to increase demand, the market should self-correct and likely go back to the way it was just a few years ago; i.e. little to no GF foods in normal grocery stores, limited selection in "natural" grocery stores, and with the majority of products available online.

It would be interesting to see a nutritional study done on something like this. Absent people with celiac disease or other gluten sensitivities, is it healthier for the average person to substitute gluten-free breads, cereals, etc. for traditional stuff. I think that'll be the test that may help or hurt the GF industry. If they can grow demand by non-celiacs then I think the market can continue to grow.

My sister-in-law talks about trying GF all the time to lose weight, but I have a sneaking suspicion that she weighs 275lbs because her diet is 90% processed/refined carbs, 4% fat, and maybe 1% protein. And her hobbies are watching TV and taking naps. I don't think swapping out her 3 bowls of captain crunch in the morning for a GF substitute is going to yield any meaningful results.
I don't mind gluten free products except for the price and the taste for the most part. If if the taste goes up and price come down enough, I would treat them like any other food product. But it's insane that people are buying $10 boxes of cookies to give to kids because they are gluten free, but still contain gobs of sugar. Like you're saying.

Obviously some people are sensitive. The tennis player Nole Djokavic could not make it through tough matches without having breathing difficulties until kicking the gluten. Now he can afford as much of it as he likes
But seriously, I don't know if this was a physiological or a psychological effect. At the highest levels of performance a little improvement in either could account for the difference.

I'm not sure if a study has been done. It usually comes out in the nonintervention population studies, if enough people eat a certain way some kind of correlation can be established. Will look around and see....

I agree that it's largely from an economic point of view. But at the same time I think we're being naive to think that we aren't considering gluten-free because of the marketing and economic forces in play. The nutritional bandwagon aspect is an effect of its marketing.

Last edited by Larry Bruce : 06-22-2012 at 12:08 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 12:11 PM   #5
Katherine Derbyshire
Member Katherine Derbyshire is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Seattle  WA
Posts: 7,596
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Given that humans have been eating wheat for thousands of years, it strikes me as very unlikely that the "typical" (non-sensitive) person will see any benefits whatsoever by dropping gluten.

Wheat tolerance, like lactose tolerance, would have given those groups that had it a survival advantage. Natural selection would therefore tend to increase prevalence of the trait.

Katherine
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 12:48 PM   #6
Kevin Benson
Member Kevin Benson is offline
 
Kevin Benson's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Parker  CO
Posts: 253
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
Given that humans have been eating wheat for thousands of years, it strikes me as very unlikely that the "typical" (non-sensitive) person will see any benefits whatsoever by dropping gluten.

Katherine
I think any benefit to going GF would come from not trying to replace the breads, cereals, etc. with the current array of GF products. All you end up doing is swapping one processed refined carb for another.

When I learned of my mild gluten senstivity about 5 years ago, I cut it out completely and dropped about 30lbs in a couple months.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2012, 01:56 PM   #7
Mara Rozitis
Member Mara Rozitis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ste. Anne  MB Canada
Posts: 142
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Benson View Post
I think any benefit to going GF would come from not trying to replace the breads, cereals, etc. with the current array of GF products. All you end up doing is swapping one processed refined carb for another.
Yeah, that. Even the few celiacs I know go crazy on all kinds of processed garbage, thinking it's perfectly fine because it's gluten free. And then they whine and howl that there aren't enough restaurants that serve gluten free stuff. If they prepared their own food and used restaurants and gluten free baking/crackers/etc. as a once-in-a-while treat I think they would be much healthier. As it is, they are truly just swapping one kind of processed crap for another.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 12:31 PM   #8
Daniel Dean
Member Daniel Dean is offline
 
Daniel Dean's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Salt Lake City  UT
Posts: 359
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Benson View Post
I think any benefit to going GF would come from not trying to replace the breads, cereals, etc. with the current array of GF products. All you end up doing is swapping one processed refined carb for another.
Thirded. I've seen ingredient lists on GF foods that were nutritionally abysmal.


That said, GF has legs for me. I have had eczema/dermatitis issues for years. Two months ago I decided to go completely GF for a month and it disappeared completely. I have since experimented with adding back in some gluten foods and with the exception of very limited beer consumption I break out every time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 02:32 PM   #9
Kevin Benson
Member Kevin Benson is offline
 
Kevin Benson's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Parker  CO
Posts: 253
Re: Gluten-free doesn't have legs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Dean View Post
I have had eczema/dermatitis issues for years. Two months ago I decided to go completely GF for a month and it disappeared completely. I have since experimented with adding back in some gluten foods and with the exception of very limited beer consumption I break out every time.
I'm in the same boat. I don't have the stomach issues a lot of people have with gluten, but it makes everything else flair up; skin, eyes, seasonal allergies, etc.

I can maybe get away with the equivalent of 1-2 slices of bread every few weeks, anything more than that and I'm regretting it.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beyond Gluten-Free Valarie Wright Nutrition 5 06-09-2011 01:21 PM
Gluten Free Mike Ridgley Nutrition 7 05-15-2010 12:05 AM
Gluten Free Beer Ben Bergeron Nutrition 9 04-12-2009 07:11 PM
Gluten Free Noodles Thomas Covington Nutrition 5 08-28-2008 05:41 PM
Gluten free cooking Kevin Burns Nutrition 0 04-10-2007 04:30 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.