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Old 01-16-2010, 12:53 PM   #31
Antonio Roca
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Thumbs up Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

Oh, well that's good. I appreciate the effort you put into this, especially considering this is all for free. I'll keep the offer for help duly noted if I ever come across some problems!

Thanks!
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Old 01-17-2010, 08:26 PM   #32
Aaron Gainer
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

My vote would be work on mobility 1-2 times a day or more if sitting. You will have a new appreciation for how well mobility drills work when you do them everyday for more than a couple weeks.

And as always, foam roll/massage overuse muscles and strengthen the antagonists. My findings from similar experience tend to be a lack of glute strength/activation which can cause a flair up of knee or back pain. I work on glute activation before lower body workouts, and at least 1-2 other days a week for posture purposes.


Remember, you have to take action and generally undo whats causing you pain. In general, your daily life outside the gym needs to be thought over and changed to where your rehab training will be beneficial(The 23/1 rule). It won't happen overnight or in a couple weeks, but it will improve if your willing to work at it.
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Old 01-17-2010, 09:44 PM   #33
Chris Puckett
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

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Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
I'm not really angry at you. Mostly Chris cause he keeps complaining about various stuff, yet does not follow any of the advice given.
hahaha, but immediately after the injury I did mostly just what you recommended in your article, stretch, ice, trigger point, light strength movement, saw PT who gave rec's. All it resulted in was a full blown swollen knee, even less mobility and a lot of pain. I took a few days completely off to let the swelling & pain subside. I am back to the strengthening, we will see how it goes. honestly though I am worried this is worse than normal. great site though and congrats on the launch, you've got a lot of good information and I like your suggestions about footwear
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Old 01-18-2010, 08:12 AM   #34
Steven Low
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

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Originally Posted by Chris Puckett View Post
hahaha, but immediately after the injury I did mostly just what you recommended in your article, stretch, ice, trigger point, light strength movement, saw PT who gave rec's. All it resulted in was a full blown swollen knee, even less mobility and a lot of pain. I took a few days completely off to let the swelling & pain subside. I am back to the strengthening, we will see how it goes. honestly though I am worried this is worse than normal. great site though and congrats on the launch, you've got a lot of good information and I like your suggestions about footwear
@$#^%%$&#$#

Maybe you missed the one thing that I always say which is NEVER work through pain.

Acutely, you take fish oil for anti-inflammation, ice, compression and light mobility work WITHOUT pain.

Then once movement starts to improve, and pain/inflammation starts to go away you add in stuff SLOWLY.
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Old 01-20-2010, 10:20 AM   #35
Chris Puckett
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

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Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
@$#^%%$&#$#
been doing the light strength/mobility work for the last five days and I can honestly say the pain is gone, but I am still swollen. Rest assured Steven I have been following your advice over the last five days. My knee feels more stable, but that is likely due to the swelling. I have been doing a circuit wall sits, lateral side steps with a band around ankles, pushups, situps. Have been researching other glute movements to start working in over the next weeks. My knee still clicks though. Will continue the strengthening for another 3 weeks, and go see an orthopedic dr if the clicking does not go away.
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Old 01-20-2010, 07:34 PM   #36
Steven Low
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

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Originally Posted by Chris Puckett View Post
been doing the light strength/mobility work for the last five days and I can honestly say the pain is gone, but I am still swollen. Rest assured Steven I have been following your advice over the last five days. My knee feels more stable, but that is likely due to the swelling. I have been doing a circuit wall sits, lateral side steps with a band around ankles, pushups, situps. Have been researching other glute movements to start working in over the next weeks. My knee still clicks though. Will continue the strengthening for another 3 weeks, and go see an orthopedic dr if the clicking does not go away.
What in the heck?

If you have pain and swelling you need to stop exercising immediately.

There's very little you can do with exercise that will help if there's swelling and point. You should really stop aggravating it.

It's good that the pain is gone, but you should get some compression on the knee + maybe some ice and fish oil. Get everything calmed down. Then work it out.

I'll respond to your e-mail when that's the case.


#1 rule NEVER exercise through pain. You just make it worse 99.99% of the time.

Acute phase always work on eliminating pain, inflammation, and swelling. Mobility work without pain is OK, strengthening work, stretching, etc. in general is not.
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Old 08-22-2010, 10:56 AM   #37
Heather-Violet Minnella
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Talking Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

Ugh, I know this thread is old, but if there's any chance that someone will consider my two cents, well then here it is...

I suffer from PFPS, and it is severely limiting. Since the onset of symptoms in April 2010, I have seen two sports med physicians, one orthopedist, a podiatrist, and two different PTs. The MDs have proven to be the most useless, and their information regarding the pathology of PFPS is conflicting (no general consensus!!!). The therapists, while very helpful in pointing out my poor poor POOR squatting form and excessive lordotic tendencies, have prescribed exercises that WILL be helpful one day... in the meantime, I am approaching WEEK TWELVE of rehabilitation exercises, with the majority of the movements being nearly impossible for me to complete pain-free.

I truly hope that you have experienced some relief from this badbadBAD "syndrome". I'm sorry the doctors never ordered complete rest for me---they just shoved me right into physical therapy, which I'm convinced really aggravated my condition. Their professional opinion (and justification) is that I do not know the difference between PAIN and DISCOMFORT. This is insulting and clearly not the case. Much like yourself, it was very difficult for me to give up activity. This is something I am JUST NOW coming to REALLY know and implement into my routine.

Time and consistency are crucial to your recovery. Whatever it is you do to facilitate healing, you're going to have to give your body time, and you're going to have to be consistent with your "trial and error" methods of relief.

My new plan of action: I am finished with the single-legged squats that have IRRITATED my knees for DAYS after performing them (as prescribed by PT). Having listened to the best medical advice (coming from my own knees!), my only quad-dominant exercises are going to be static, in the form of split squats, lunges, and wall squats. And this is only to MAINTAIN adequate quadriceps functioning. I work on glute/hamstring strength, while correcting any soft tissue kinks through self-myofascial relief (using a PVC pipe "foam" roller). Stretching is great, but you need to "iron" out those muscles with some kind of massage or active therapy release. Look for a good massage therapist, preferably someone who is experienced in sports massage and trigger point therapy. Hip strength and flexibility should have precedence, along with glute strength and quad/IT band flexibility. I am hesitant about taking NSAIDs, as they inhibit bio feedback, however I always ice my knees after I use them. I continue to work on my core strength and chest/back/shoulders. Circuits are great because they help improve cardio---something that is severely lacking for me lately!!!

I live on the second floor, and just carrying my own body up the stairs is enough to bother my knees. I know how you feel.
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:38 PM   #38
Steven Low
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

Make sure you're talking up stairs correctly.

Obviously you lift the foot up and plant it down on the next stair up. If you're having problems with quad/ham imbalance and lack of hip involvement (most people) you're going to want to:

1. Keep the shin as vertical as possible. don't lean forward over the knee.

2. As you step up do so by "dragging your heel back" keeping the torso upright

This will help get the glutes/hammies involved more, and take less pressure off of the P-T, and P-F complex, especially if you're having problems with too much quad or other quad issues.
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:48 PM   #39
Heather-Violet Minnella
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Thumbs up Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
Make sure you're talking up stairs correctly.
This will help get the glutes/hammies involved more, and take less pressure off of the P-T, and P-F complex, especially if you're having problems with too much quad or other quad issues.
Thanks, Steven. I have to think about going upstairs now... definitely like teaching yourself simple movements all over again, as if you're just learning them for the first time. When I step up, I have to think about keeping my chest up, and when I push, I'm thinking about my hip and glutes. This "channeling the hips" applies for sitting in chairs and getting up off the toilet, too! I've been doing it all wrong for the last 23 years.

What do you think about Rolfing? I have scheduled to meet with a certified Rolfer/RYT/massage therapist to complete 90 minutes of myofascial therapy aimed at my lower half.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:13 PM   #40
Steven Low
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Re: Patellofemoral syndrome

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Originally Posted by Heather-Violet Minnella View Post
Thanks, Steven. I have to think about going upstairs now... definitely like teaching yourself simple movements all over again, as if you're just learning them for the first time. When I step up, I have to think about keeping my chest up, and when I push, I'm thinking about my hip and glutes. This "channeling the hips" applies for sitting in chairs and getting up off the toilet, too! I've been doing it all wrong for the last 23 years.

What do you think about Rolfing? I have scheduled to meet with a certified Rolfer/RYT/massage therapist to complete 90 minutes of myofascial therapy aimed at my lower half.
Yeah... most people do it wrong. That's why there's so many messed up people. The chronic sitting epidemics + forcing gym/recess time out of schools will only make things worse for the up and coming kid population. Unfortunately.

In general, good things. Any type of massage is great most of the time.... competent people in rolf/ART/etc. tend to help a lot.

Let us know how it goes.
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