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Old 07-13-2004, 10:27 AM   #1
Alexander Karatis
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This morning, while asking a co-worker for a glass of water, she replied:

-"Warm or cold-but-oh-what am i saying, you don't need to lsoe any fat..."

It struck me as odd, so I naturally asked what she meant by that. She replied saying:

-"Well, didn't you know? Warm water burns fat!"

I replied assuring her that proper hydration does indeed help with fatloss among other things, but that temperature had nothing to do with it. She insisted telling me it was her dietician who told her. When I started my usual "junk-science dietician mini-lecture" she inssted even more since it was her dietician who helped her lose 25 kgs.

In any case, have any of you heard of anything like it? Could you imagine a way in which this theory would have some credibility? I'm always willing to learn new things but this just felt off...
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Old 07-13-2004, 11:47 AM   #2
Ross Hunt
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Alexander-

I HAVE heard something about water temperature having the opposite effect on body temperature - i.e., cold water makes your body temperature rise, hot makes it fall - but this was presented to me anecdotally in the context of explaining why it's better for you to drink warm water when you're overheated and dehydrated. If it's true, maybe changing body temperature would have some effect on the metabolism?

Chemists?

Ross hunt
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Old 07-13-2004, 01:03 PM   #3
Lincoln Brigham
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Chemists, schmemists. It's physics.

Drank water in at 50 degrees. Urinate or sweat that same water out at 98.6 degrees. How did it get heated? Calories.
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Old 07-13-2004, 01:53 PM   #4
Alexander Karatis
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Isn't that just body temperature that heats our urine and sweat which (the 98.6 temperature)exists regardless if we drink water or not, hot or cold?

Hence, we didn't actually burn more calories to heat the water...Or am I wrong?
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Old 07-13-2004, 02:06 PM   #5
Barry Cooper
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Technically, a calorie is a unit of energy, if I'm not mistaken. It is a measure of work. When you get on the treadmill, and it measures calories, it's measuring the work output in terms that physicists would recognize.

It takes energy to heat things. The water is at state x, and it has to be raised to a state of higher excitation, y, and it takes work to do that.

The challenge in this case is that, just as the calorie counter on the treadmill is not always very helpful in predicting weight loss--hormones and other factors "weigh" in as well--I'm not sure you can say that cold water will actually help in weight loss.

It does seem, though, that cold water would be more helpful than warm water, but, again, hormones and other factor some into play.

This is one of those things where experimentation would be in order.
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Old 07-13-2004, 03:12 PM   #6
Lincoln Brigham
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Right.

If the body heats up that water 40 degrees, and the body stays 98.6 degrees, then calories were burnt heating up the water. It takes calories to keep the body at 98.6 degrees. Basic physics.

In theory, you could get the same effect by standing out in the cold, unless doing so lowered your core body temperature.
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Old 07-13-2004, 03:36 PM   #7
Brian Hand
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On the one hand, your body does burn energy to maintain body temperature, so drinking some cold water will make you burn more calories to do so; however, in a hot environment, it has to expend energy to produce sweat, to cool the body to the desired temperature. I guess if your sweating drinking cold water won't make you burn more calories, but if you're cool it will. Conversely if you're sweating from a workout or a hot day or whatever, drinking hot water might make you sweat a little harder, burning more energy. I'm trying to think of a worse way to burn a few extra calories ..... nope, can't.
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Old 07-13-2004, 05:40 PM   #8
John de la Garza
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the body isn't %100 responsible for the raising temp. if it is 100 degree outside and your body is trying to cool off the water was heated by the environment, too
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Old 07-13-2004, 05:44 PM   #9
John de la Garza
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just keep in mind that one of the body's methods of dealing with be cooled is to put on more fat. Look at a cold water swimmer or eskimo, they look like seals.

burning calories alone wont cause weight lose only a calorie deficit. if you drink 10 glasses of ice water a day and it causes you to burn an extra 200 calories but you consume an extra 300 due to the adatptaion a spoke of earlier...your going to gain fat
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Old 07-14-2004, 05:00 AM   #10
Brian Hand
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John, or anyone, is the adaptation of cold water swimmers higher bodyfat, or a shift more towards subcutaneous storage?
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