CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > In Sickness and In Health > Health and Medical Issues
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Health and Medical Issues For other than injuries

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-26-2009, 12:07 PM   #31
Mark Griffith
Affiliate Mark Griffith is offline
 
Mark Griffith's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Brick  NJ
Posts: 216
Re: sleep apnea?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Berardi View Post
Thanks for posting that! What is the device you had success with called?

NP.
I double checked my BP this morning and it was down almost to normal. It had been high - caused by the apnea.

Sleep Angel

Search around for best price.Ebay and such. I paid like 30 or so for it.

Good luck with it.
__________________
CrossFit Lithium
http://www.crossfitlithium.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 01:05 PM   #32
Matt Berardi
Member Matt Berardi is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New York  NY
Posts: 215
Re: sleep apnea?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Griffith View Post
NP.
I double checked my BP this morning and it was down almost to normal. It had been high - caused by the apnea.

Sleep Angel

Search around for best price.Ebay and such. I paid like 30 or so for it.

Good luck with it.
Thanks I appreciate it
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2009, 05:12 AM   #33
Greg Crawford
Member Greg Crawford is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Boston  MA
Posts: 23
Exclamation Re: sleep apnea?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert D Taylor Jr View Post
I had a sleep study done. I walked around the Naval Hospital like I had a bomb vest on wore it overnight at home and brought it back. What I'm supposed to do is wear a CPAP, but since I can't sleep with one I use a method I call suffer in silence. So far, I would say it hasn't worked. I intend to get the surgery done soon and I'm considering getting a Power Lung under the theory that if my respiratory system is stronger I will be less apneic.
Robert et al:

I had the same study done, and did quite a bit of research (fortunately, I only have a mild case). You may want to be a little more serious about this, as sleep apnea can have some significant health impacts regardless of physical conditioning - like stroke. I highly recommend you research the surgery (I assume you are talking about Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP - see this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty WFS). It seems it's not as successful as some think, and the effects don't always last - a downer since it supposedly hurts like an SOB for quite a while. There are also other solutions out there that don't involve a CPAP (a molded mouth piece that hold the jaw slightly forward to open the airway, can't remember the name). Be smart and educate yourself. Doctors generally mean well, but the M.D. at the end doesn;t equate to "all-knowing" and in the end, it's your health. No one will care about it as much as you.

Anyways, hope everyone finds this helpful.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2009, 09:03 AM   #34
Marc Ackerman
Member Marc Ackerman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Simpsonville  SC
Posts: 47
Re: sleep apnea?

I have been diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and have been using a CPAP for a couple of years. I have stopped using the CPAP machine and starting using a mouthpiece instead. It seems to be working for me. I purchased it online from off of the TV ad:

www.puresleep.com w/f/s

Either way, do the sleep study so you can determine what type of apnea you may have. Obstructive can be helped by surgery, but Central Apnea is a totally different thing. Mental in causation, so the surgery probably wouldn't help much.

My .02
__________________
Workout Log- Failure to plan on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 12:26 PM   #35
Seth Hollen
Member Seth Hollen is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Largo  FL
Posts: 114
Re: sleep apnea?

I'm a sleep tech and thought I'd jump in here.

Apnea bad.
UPPP surgery in my opinion (and many others) bad.
for that surgery they basically go in and cut out any excess tissue they can find, kind a like a rotor-router plumber.

it's very painful and the main thing is the long term prognosis isn't very good they are seeing more and more data showing that alot of the tissue can grow back over time and you are back to the beginning. Also I have personally done sleep studies on people and have seen it even make their apnea worse.

Sleep angel. It's a chinstrap- thats it. It may keep your mouth closed and help get rid of snoring but I don't see ANY possible way it can keep your airway open. If it works for you great, but I'll bet money you still have sleep apnea.

Apnea varies a lot. I have seen people that have a very high apnea index (# of apneas/hour) and need a very slight cpap pressure to clear everything up. conversley I've seen people with a low apnea index and they need a very high pressure.

Mouth devices. These only work if you have a problem with the way your jaw is situated.

other surgeries: Sometimes people have a very narrow or recessed jaw, or deviated septum. in these cases surgery can help a lot-- IF there is a specific problem the doctor sees. Interestingly sometimes getting wisdom teeth removed at too early of an age can cause the moth to grow more narrow than it's supposed to and can cause breathing problems.

Don't goto a surgeon about sleep apnea, surgeons cut, it's what they do. Go see a sleep specialist. Also when surgeons quote statistics for successful apnea surgeries it's considered a "successful" surgery if it cuts the number of apneas in half.
i.e. if someone has severe apnea of say 70 apneas/hour and they have the UPPP and now have 35/hour it is considered a successful surgery even though they still have severe sleep apnea.


some things to try for CPAP/BiPAP:
Mask fit, in general I feel smaller is better. My favorite mask right now is the Resmed Swift LT.
The sign that the mask is fitting well is if it's quiet. If you hear noise, it's 99% of the time from air leaking out.

Resmed and Respironics are the 2 biggest players in the CPAP market. Respironics has something called CFLEX. it modulates the way the air pressure is delivered and it just feels more comfortable. Resmed has a similar thing ( I think it's called EPR) some of the low end machines don't have it though. If you are having problems using CPAP you might want to make sure you machine has a feature like this.
Also Some people feel better using a BiPAP machine. BiPAP is a a bi-level cpap machine. It increases the pressure when you inhale and lowers it when you exhale (the exhale pressure is the key to clearing up Obstructive sleep apnea)

they also make auto-titrator machines. These are "supposed" to detect apnea and snoring and only increase the pressure when needed.
I have seen these be very accurate and other times be very inaccurate. My gut feeling is that the mask fit and mouth leak are the keys to it working the best. I have no data to back that up however.
these can be great for people who's apnea is related to their position or stage of sleep.
Most people have more airway resistance when they sleep on their back. in some cases people have apnea on their back only (we call it positional apnea. I prefer to have those people try to keep on their side instead of wearing a mask.) most apneas sufferers have apnea on the side as well it's just worse on thier back.

some people only have "REM dependent OSA". In REM sleep your body looses all muscle tone. (Dr's feel it's your bodies way of preventing you from acting out your dreams.) In REM the muscles that help keep your airway open loose their tone also and many people only have apnea in REM.
Therefore most of the night they need very little pressure to keep their airway open. In that case an auto titrator might be best for them.
They are very expensive and insurance rarely covers them.

There is a new type of machine called an adaptive servo-ventilator.
This is made for people with complex sleep apnea. Complex sleep apnea is a term for mixed apneas that contain an obstructive and central component.
Often this is associated with people with congestive heart failure. studies are showing that if you can get CHF pt's apnea and breathing stable their heart does better (Ejection fraction goes up IIRC) they aren't sure why. it's sort of a chicken and egg thing, does the apenea cause the heart failure or the heart failure cause the apnea (that's part of the reason it's complex )
I have done quite a few studies using them, I think my lab was the second in the country to get them, I've seen them work well and other times seem to do nothing. Usually the pt's using them are very sick with lots of other medical problems that can make the study more difficult.

Anyways I'm a registered sleep tech with over 10 years experience in the field. if anyone has any sleep questions feel free to ask me. I'll try to help.
BTW my dad and a uncle have sleep apnea. I know all the treatements out there for it and I have them on CPAP. That's the best testimonial I can give for it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 12:49 PM   #36
Robert D Taylor Jr
Member Robert D Taylor Jr is offline
 
Robert D Taylor Jr's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Chesapeake  VA
Posts: 1,736
Re: sleep apnea?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seth Hollen View Post
I'm a sleep tech and thought I'd jump in here.

Apnea bad.
UPPP surgery in my opinion (and many others) bad.
for that surgery they basically go in and cut out any excess tissue they can find, kind a like a rotor-router plumber.

it's very painful and the main thing is the long term prognosis isn't very good they are seeing more and more data showing that alot of the tissue can grow back over time and you are back to the beginning. Also I have personally done sleep studies on people and have seen it even make their apnea worse.

Sleep angel. It's a chinstrap- thats it. It may keep your mouth closed and help get rid of snoring but I don't see ANY possible way it can keep your airway open. If it works for you great, but I'll bet money you still have sleep apnea.

Apnea varies a lot. I have seen people that have a very high apnea index (# of apneas/hour) and need a very slight cpap pressure to clear everything up. conversley I've seen people with a low apnea index and they need a very high pressure.

Mouth devices. These only work if you have a problem with the way your jaw is situated.

other surgeries: Sometimes people have a very narrow or recessed jaw, or deviated septum. in these cases surgery can help a lot-- IF there is a specific problem the doctor sees. Interestingly sometimes getting wisdom teeth removed at too early of an age can cause the moth to grow more narrow than it's supposed to and can cause breathing problems.

Don't goto a surgeon about sleep apnea, surgeons cut, it's what they do. Go see a sleep specialist. Also when surgeons quote statistics for successful apnea surgeries it's considered a "successful" surgery if it cuts the number of apneas in half.
i.e. if someone has severe apnea of say 70 apneas/hour and they have the UPPP and now have 35/hour it is considered a successful surgery even though they still have severe sleep apnea.


some things to try for CPAP/BiPAP:
Mask fit, in general I feel smaller is better. My favorite mask right now is the Resmed Swift LT.
The sign that the mask is fitting well is if it's quiet. If you hear noise, it's 99% of the time from air leaking out.

Resmed and Respironics are the 2 biggest players in the CPAP market. Respironics has something called CFLEX. it modulates the way the air pressure is delivered and it just feels more comfortable. Resmed has a similar thing ( I think it's called EPR) some of the low end machines don't have it though. If you are having problems using CPAP you might want to make sure you machine has a feature like this.
Also Some people feel better using a BiPAP machine. BiPAP is a a bi-level cpap machine. It increases the pressure when you inhale and lowers it when you exhale (the exhale pressure is the key to clearing up Obstructive sleep apnea)

they also make auto-titrator machines. These are "supposed" to detect apnea and snoring and only increase the pressure when needed.
I have seen these be very accurate and other times be very inaccurate. My gut feeling is that the mask fit and mouth leak are the keys to it working the best. I have no data to back that up however.
these can be great for people who's apnea is related to their position or stage of sleep.
Most people have more airway resistance when they sleep on their back. in some cases people have apnea on their back only (we call it positional apnea. I prefer to have those people try to keep on their side instead of wearing a mask.) most apneas sufferers have apnea on the side as well it's just worse on thier back.

some people only have "REM dependent OSA". In REM sleep your body looses all muscle tone. (Dr's feel it's your bodies way of preventing you from acting out your dreams.) In REM the muscles that help keep your airway open loose their tone also and many people only have apnea in REM.
Therefore most of the night they need very little pressure to keep their airway open. In that case an auto titrator might be best for them.
They are very expensive and insurance rarely covers them.

There is a new type of machine called an adaptive servo-ventilator.
This is made for people with complex sleep apnea. Complex sleep apnea is a term for mixed apneas that contain an obstructive and central component.
Often this is associated with people with congestive heart failure. studies are showing that if you can get CHF pt's apnea and breathing stable their heart does better (Ejection fraction goes up IIRC) they aren't sure why. it's sort of a chicken and egg thing, does the apenea cause the heart failure or the heart failure cause the apnea (that's part of the reason it's complex )
I have done quite a few studies using them, I think my lab was the second in the country to get them, I've seen them work well and other times seem to do nothing. Usually the pt's using them are very sick with lots of other medical problems that can make the study more difficult.

Anyways I'm a registered sleep tech with over 10 years experience in the field. if anyone has any sleep questions feel free to ask me. I'll try to help.
BTW my dad and a uncle have sleep apnea. I know all the treatements out there for it and I have them on CPAP. That's the best testimonial I can give for it.
That's some really good information seriously. And I do appreciate your expertise. But it distills even simpler for me: Sleep Apnea = apparently poor sleep. CPAP= no sleep. That's a fairly easy decision to make for me.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2015, 04:12 PM   #37
Oleksandr Tyutyunnyk
Member Oleksandr Tyutyunnyk is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bellevue  WA
Posts: 4
Re: sleep apnea?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert D Taylor Jr View Post
That's some really good information seriously. And I do appreciate your expertise. But it distills even simpler for me: Sleep Apnea = apparently poor sleep. CPAP= no sleep. That's a fairly easy decision to make for me.
I understand it is bad to re-animate this thread. But sleep apnea is a serious stuff and the last post above is very discouraging. To balance it out, I would state:
Sleep Apnea/UARS = poor sleep. CPAP = wonderful sleep... it does require some fine-tuning and don't expect your sleep doctror to do that for you. It's solely in your hands and results can be remarkable.

Just in case, I am male, 22 BMI
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2015, 07:26 PM   #38
Robert D Taylor Jr
Member Robert D Taylor Jr is offline
 
Robert D Taylor Jr's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Chesapeake  VA
Posts: 1,736
Re: sleep apnea?

Again CPAP=No sleep for me. Sleep>no sleep.

I now have a dental appliance which helps.

Nice necropost.
__________________
Experience is a hard teacher because they gives the test first, and the lessons afterwards. - Vernon Sanders Law
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sleep apnea and fitness Beth Moscov Health and Medical Issues 10 07-25-2008 01:42 PM
Sleep Frank Menendez Fitness 38 02-05-2006 02:45 PM
Sleep Comfort Sleep Number Mattress David Birozy Community 15 08-26-2005 06:44 PM
Get some sleep Mike Minium Community 0 12-06-2004 08:06 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.