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Old 08-10-2007, 03:57 AM   #1
Henry Tyler
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There is a big tree in the park near my house.

I want to work out with my climbing rope when it is hang on the tree.

Would anyone tell me how to hang a climbing rope on the tree and to retrieve it?
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Old 08-10-2007, 07:30 AM   #2
Tom Fetter
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Same way sailors used to get heavy mooring lines ashore.

Get a relatively lightweight but fairly strong rope (say, 1/4" nylon) to use as a "heaving line." Tie a light weight on one end of this, and throw it over the limb. Tie the other end to your climbing rope, and use the heaving line to pull your climbing rope up and over.

If it were me, I'd have a long enough length of climbing rope to tie securely 'round the tree itself, to anchor it. But if your heaving line is strong enough (e.g. spectra, or some nylon), you might consider simply belaying it around the tree trunk, if you can tie the heaving line securely enough to the climbing rope that nothing will slip. Be aware that most knots are significantly (like 40%) weaker than the breaking strength of the line they're tied in.

When you're done, untie, coil up, and go home.

While this would work, climbing ropes are thick and heavy, and humping one around will likely get old pretty quickly. I'd be inclined to try to find a location where I wouldn't have to rig and de-rig every time I wanted to use it.
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Old 08-10-2007, 09:49 AM   #3
Chris Goodrich
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An alternative I've used with a light heaving line is to tie a bowline on the end of the climbing rope I attach the heaving line to. Once the rope is over the tree I pull the bowline down, run the free running end of the climbing rope through the loop in the bowline, and cinch it down on the tree branch.
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Old 08-14-2007, 01:15 AM   #4
Lynne Pitts
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Moving to Equipment
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:12 PM   #5
David Cynamon
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why not use an eye splice? it's stronger and more permanent than a bowline
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Old 08-15-2007, 12:19 AM   #6
Reece Holliday
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Might want to consider using a quick draw which can be seen here..http://www.greatoutdoorsdepot.com/om...ight-bent.html
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Old 08-15-2007, 07:16 PM   #7
David Wood
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Reece: safe link, right? (it's pretty obvious, but, please, do post the indication).

David: an eye splice is fine if (a) you know what you're doing when you make it (I've seen these unravel; I'd weave at least 6 inches), and (b) you wrap it around a steel reinforcer for the rope. That combination should be better than a bowline.

But . . . not if you want to retrieve the rope (which I think was the original question?). If I understood Chris's directions correctly, I think you'd end up with a near-permanent setup ... the climbing rope would be cinched up tight to the tree branch, some 20 - 30 feet overhead. Good if you can leave it there, not so good if you want to take it home today.

For easy retrieval, nothing beats carrying 2x or 3x the length of rope, tying it off at ground or chest level and heaving it over the branch. Does get heavy to lug around, though.
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Old 08-15-2007, 07:35 PM   #8
Chris Goodrich
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David,
I probably didn't explain it well, but my method is non-permanent. Because you simply thread the free running end through the loop of the bowline (or eye-splice, bowline is just easier and more idiot proof for me), to get the rope down all you do is yank the bowline end back down with the heaving line, and pull the free running end back out. This method requires more rope than tying straight to the tree branch but less than anchoring to something at ground level. Takes all of 2 minutes to set-up or tear down. It does put some wear and tear on the rope though, so inspect it each time.
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:17 PM   #9
David Wood
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Makes sense . . . I didn't realize that the heaving line is still tied into the bowline/eye splice, and reaches the ground, so you can "un-cinch" the knot from down below.

Thanks for the clearer explanation.
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