CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Nutrition
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Nutrition Diet, supplements, weightloss, health & longevity

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-04-2008, 07:33 PM   #11
Scott Allen Hanson
Member Scott Allen Hanson is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Idaho Falls  Idaho
Posts: 1,008
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Susie Rosenberg View Post
Some of my very mainstream medicine oncologist friends tell their patients with hormone-sensitive tumors to avoid industrial-rasied meat--to stick to grassfed meats and dairy and free range chickens and eggs.

I have reasons to be eating "anti-cancer" as well and here's my program FWIW:

1. The base of my food pyramid is built on vegetables: lots of dark leafy greens and veggies in a wide range of colors.

2. Next is colorful fruits, especially berries.

3. Fish, lots of fish: I eat sardines, salmon, or herring most days of the week, also shellfish.

4. Grassfed meats, free range poultry and eggs.

5. Organic yogurt.

Supplements: Zyflamend and fish oil.

The most important things are to avoid processed foods and industrially-raised animals products.

Susie
Susie,

You're alway a font of wisdom and I'm comforted to know that my pyramid looks a lot like yours.

Out of curiosity, do you avoid alcohol completely? It seems like the most obvious risk factor for cancer.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 04:12 AM   #12
Susie Rosenberg
Member Susie Rosenberg is offline
 
Susie Rosenberg's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Albany  NY
Posts: 1,530
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Allen Hanson View Post
Susie,

You're alway a font of wisdom and I'm comforted to know that my pyramid looks a lot like yours.

Out of curiosity, do you avoid alcohol completely? It seems like the most obvious risk factor for cancer.
hehehehe....I don't know about a font of wisdom, but it's better than a bath of bull****!

I drink red wine, 1 or 2 glasses, about once a week. Alcohol more than 2 drinks a day for men or 1 drink for women is bad for health, but most studies show that up to 4 oz. of wine/day (women) actually provides a healthy dose of antioxidants plus relaxation!

I can't drink that much, but I do look forward to my once a week red wine.

Susie
__________________
Those who hear not the music, think the dancers mad.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 06:14 AM   #13
Georgia Nixon
Member Georgia Nixon is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arlington  VA
Posts: 20
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

www.cancer.net (safe for work) is one of the best resources out there for cancer patients, survivors, and their family and friends. If you are interested in a little more science, then click on the link for oncologists and search the ASCO.org website for the latest studies.

If the person you are concerned about is a female and you are worried about female specific cancers, I would also direct you to www.BeBrightPink.org (safe for work). Lindsay Avner is a dynamic young woman who has created an amazing organization full of information and helpful resources for young women...especially those with genetic risks of cancer.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 06:29 AM   #14
Patrick Poblocki
Member Patrick Poblocki is offline
 
Patrick Poblocki's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Thompson  CT
Posts: 147
Unhappy Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Thanks all. It all makes sense, especially the large quantities of veggies. I think the red wine is a good idea too (thanks susie!)

So on a similar but separate issue (same person, different disorder)..."she" also has a heart condition which makes a high sodium diet essential per doctor's orders. She is subject to severe drops in blood pressure as a result of low sodium.

The doctor has told her to eat a lot of crackers for their sodium content. This is against every rule that I've learned. But, while being an obvious no no for us, it's even worse for the person prescribe this diet. It's not going to help the issues of cancer. I've tried to suggest adding salt to food, but I guess the amount she needs would be really gross. Currently, besides the crackers she drinks a lot of Propel Water which has salt and electrolytes. She's staying away from Gatorade, which is good. But she typically has 2 packages of crackers a day.

Any healthy ways to get sodium in the diet without distorting a "Susie-Like" pyramid? I really appreciate this help more so than the feedback I've received about my own issues. Thanks in advance.

Pat
__________________
Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated. Ernest Hemingway
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 07:19 AM   #15
Craig Van De Walker
Member Craig Van De Walker is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Beaverton  OR
Posts: 872
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Sure, they used to give us "salt tablets" during summer football practice, I'm sure you could find those somewhere.

How much salt does she need?

Heck a lot of commercial soups have something like 2-3,000 mg per can. I didn't think a package of saltines actually had a ton of salt, but I could be wrong
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 07:34 AM   #16
Jason Hicks
Member Jason Hicks is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Cullman  Al
Posts: 63
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Ask her Doc how much he means by high sodium. If her condition is something like MVP then she needs adequate sodium as in not restricting her sodium but not like a salt block a day. I hate when MDs use terms such as high-sodium or low-sodium. I wish they would give a damn number <2000mg, >3000mg. Sorry about the rant. And I am not telling you to go against the docs advise just that high-sodium to him might not mean what high sodium might to you or me.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 09:22 AM   #17
Patrick Poblocki
Member Patrick Poblocki is offline
 
Patrick Poblocki's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Thompson  CT
Posts: 147
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Not sure about the exact amount. She's only ever said, "high sodium." I'll ask. But, I do like the idea of soup. I think there are some healthy, veggie type soups out there that could do the trick.
Thanks,

Pat
__________________
Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated. Ernest Hemingway
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 09:29 AM   #18
Georgia Nixon
Member Georgia Nixon is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arlington  VA
Posts: 20
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Just throwing this out there, but is she concerned of her cancer risk because of family history or because of her lifestyle choices? Or, are you just concerned about her cancer risk? It just kind of seems like you are getting ready to stage an intervention of sorts...
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 10:58 AM   #19
Matt DeMinico
Affiliate Matt DeMinico is offline
 
Matt DeMinico's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Sterling Heights  MI
Posts: 1,939
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd A Ferguson View Post
OK the great mystery of the microwave (MW) & how it works. In MW cooking heat is generated within the food dramatically reducing cooking time (this is its main advantage) Inside every microwave is a magnetron converting electricity into MWs essentially visible, infrared & radio waves which are non-ionizing forms of radiation (not like x-rays these make you glow in the dark).
The MWs move through the food at hi speed 2450million cycles per second as it passes through the food to a depth of about 5cm it causes food molecules to vibrate and generate heat thus cooking the food faster e.g. Eggs as opposed to rice which takes longer as it has less water content.
In theory nutrient loss on MW cooking is less as the cooking times are shorter the little use of water. Early experiments found little difference between boiling, steaming & MW effects on vitamin C loss where about the same. But recent studies have shown that the microwave comes up trumps regarding vitamin C degradation in vegetables.
The bad press around microwaves comes from nutters removing the doors overriding the safety switch and cooking their hands as they removed food from it (normally in fast food joints.) & of course that famous urban legend about an old lady & her wet miniature poodle (Jay Cohen might be interested in that outcome )
It is prudent though to let the food rest for 2-3 minutes as the cells are still cycling and generating heat, this can cause burns.
I understand there had been studies done that measured the white blood cell count after eating microwaved food, and they went through the roof.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2008, 04:01 PM   #20
Michael Francis Romano
Member Michael Francis Romano is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Fairfield  CT
Posts: 57
Re: Nutrition and Cancer (Cancer Prevention)

interesting. I'm actually taking a seminar when I head down to georgetown titled: "Calories, Cancer, Epilepsy, and Lifetime". I'll report back with what the prof has to say, if anyone would be interested.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vitamin D vs. Cancer Peter Terry Haas Nutrition 1 04-30-2007 09:41 AM
Does anyone have experience with Lung Cancer Mike Griffith Injuries 8 04-09-2007 02:30 PM
Marathon and skin cancer Mike ODonnell Community 3 11-21-2006 02:47 PM
CrossFit for the Cancer Survivor Michael Rich Testimonials 9 01-27-2006 01:06 AM
Beef and Cancer Troy Archie Nutrition 10 06-21-2005 08:19 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:53 PM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.