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Old 07-26-2007, 10:49 AM   #1
Robert Doherty
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I’ve had a chronic issue in my right calf from repeated strains/mild tears in college sports. (12 years ago) I rehabbed, I stretch, bought new (motion-control) running shoes and started really easy on the treadmill. Things were getting better. Now the problem is back and now I am having similar left calf pain, I doubt it could be a strain, I was running at about 6mph and I was less then a mile in. (would a calf cramp be soar the next day?)

I am an active, former college lacrosse player. I have been doing CF for about three months. Getting in good shape but I can’t run. I can even box jump with no problem, but can’t run. Very frustrated. Looking for ideas/suggestions.

thanks
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Old 07-30-2007, 07:12 AM   #2
Joshua Marcum
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Hey brother have you ever done any kind of muscle testing. Not the rep maxes but one that checks the kinetic chain sounds like the typical injury leads to imbalance and imbalance leads to injury kind of deal. some specific strectching and myofascial release might do the the trick
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Old 08-01-2007, 09:13 AM   #3
Keith Stevens
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I think Joshua is on the right track!
Other issues with the calf can arise with problems in the nerve root or peripheral nerves causing decreased imput to the muscle.
Strains can result in scar tissue formation which will keep the muscle from contracting/relaxing properly.
With chronic problems on one side, you may also be dealing with a compensation issue where you have been propelling mostly off of your left foot and the calf has finally burned out.
Posture, especially while running can affect the calf and hams. If your head is to far forward, the posterior leg muscles are constantly working to keep your body from faling forward.
Check out some nerve root testing(muscle testing, reflexes, and sensation). Have the arches in your feet analyzed. And Get someone to watch you run and help with your posture. Soft manipulation in the calves will help break up the scar tissue.
Oh, and a calf cramp(micro tears in the muscle) will definitely be sore for the next few days.
Hope this is helpful.
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Old 08-01-2007, 09:15 AM   #4
Keith Stevens
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By the way, start to ice you calf after every workout, regardless if it hurts or not, it will jump start the healing process. Be sure to stay between 15 and 20 min.
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Old 08-01-2007, 09:51 AM   #5
Ryan Irish
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I think Josh might be right on here with his suggestion of a possible myofascial issue. You may want to look around for a sports doc that is certified in Graston. It is a soft tissue therapy that did wonders for me in releasing scar tissue build up in my hamstring. I had been battling a pulled hammy for nearly two years and it just wouldn't heal for me regardless of how much stretching or rehabbing I did. The Graston therapy really helped a great deal, and while I still feel the periodic fear causing pinch, it is in much better shape than it was following the initial injury.

I don't want to sound like a Graston pitch man, but I do like the idea behind the treatment, and many major universities have adopted it as their main soft tissue therapy. My current sports physician is also the head sports doc for Northwestern Univ. and he swears by it.
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Old 08-03-2007, 01:30 PM   #6
Rick Martinez
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Rob,
Have you looked into ART (active release therapy)? Usually done by a qualified healthcare practitioner, likely a chripractor. I've had the pleasure of meeting several Ironman coaches and they swear by it. It utilizes real pressure points throughout the body to release tension, pain, etc from the type of injuries you describe. Just google Active release therapy and find a provider in your area.
It may be a simple solution to your problem.
Hasta
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Old 08-11-2007, 12:12 PM   #7
Joshua Marcum
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Did I not say ART crap I'm sure I was thinking it. It really works, it hurts like HELL but it works. If you can find a provider take them up.
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Old 08-11-2007, 12:50 PM   #8
William Hutson
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Can you give us some more details about when you have pain?

I had problems with my lower calf for a couple of years...it was pretty low on the calf and I (and my doctor) wrongly concluded that it was achilles related. I tried everything.

I would lay off running for a while..and then very slowly try to work back in to it. Everything would be fine for a mile or two and then all of a sudden I would have this ripping pain in (either one of lower calf muscles). And that would be it for a couple weeks.

Then a physical therapist asked me if I occasionally also had (when waking up) leg cramps...and that was the missing connection. She said it was rare to have bilateral achilles problems.

She gave me a stretch to do that has worked for more than a year.

Here's the stretch: Find some steps...put your toes on the stairs, heels hanging over. Here's the difference with most of the other stretches like this.


What you want to do is to use your hands on the railings..or the higher up stairs to control/up lift your weight, then lower your heels slowly beneath the stair they're hanging over. Do this for a minute...then slowly change the angle of your feet..point them inboard..then do the stretch, point them slightly outboard...then do the stretch again. You should feel a nice stretch on the outboard side of your lower, lower calves. Then you can slowly rotate your weight around...almost like you're hovering/wobbling over the stairs, using your hands on railings to guide you and to control how much pressure your calves have to take on...such that you stretch your calves out even more .

If you can't feel some real deep stretching on the lower left and right side of the calves, you're not doing it right (or I haven't explained it right).

this may not be your problem..but it's helped me solve a long standing lower leg problem.

Good luck.
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