CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-30-2005, 10:39 AM   #11
Ben Kaminski
Member Ben Kaminski is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Cincinnati  OH
Posts: 875
I don't think the benefits of Xfit are wasted if you don't use them in a sport or hobby. The health benefits of "elite fitness" improve quality of life in many dimensions.

For some, a physical lifestyle simply isn't on the menu. Sure, I could try to take a break from my desk every 20 minutes to run up and down the stairs and do some pushups while I'm at work, but that's unsustainable. Inevitably, I'll get focused on my work and forget the time, or be in a meeting, or be working together with someone on something, and ignore the stair-running. Sustainability is key.

That's why I love Crossfit. It takes an hour to get in an out of the gym with a good warmup and stretching afterwards, and I can do it every day as long as I scale it down from time to time.

My friends are not nearly as health conscious as me and while some do MA or recumbant cycling, it is not as big a priority. Does this mean I should go find new friends? Or change careers for that matter? In a black and white world, yes, but the world isn't black and white. I do the best I can to balance, and I think it works. One's life should not be one-dimensionally focused on fitness or any other one thing. To do so ignores the emotional aspects of good friends (who may not like to work out), the intellectual aspects of my job (which requires sitting at a desk), and does not in general create a well-rounded person.

I agree that for the best possible gene expression, one should probably haul bricks during the day and do the WOD in the evening, or lead some similarly physically active lifestyle. However, sustainability is an issue. Doing what we do comes pretty close to the ideal we have in mind, and that is usually close enough for me. Compromise is the order of the day in a world that is not black and white.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 03:58 PM   #12
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
Ben, you should have some friends who are intrested in physical activity! How about riding your bike instead of driving, or playing a sport on the weekends, or learning a new physical skill, backpacking, rockclimbing, etc. And, yes...if you are stuck behind a desk for 10 hours a day, you probably need to re-evaluate. Nothing is wrong with having friends who are not into working out, but you should also have a group of friends who will support your endevors. At 23 years old your life as an athlete is just starting. Not trying to be harsh just my observations.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 08:32 PM   #13
Mark Roughton
Member Mark Roughton is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Round Rock  TX
Posts: 128
I think this is a great topic. My impression is that many of the Crossfit stars are folks who spend a lot of time on their feet, like military folks or fitness instructors. And it seems somewhat obvious (although not a given) that you'd find a higher percentage of more "naturally" fit people on construction sites or on farms than you would among the ranks of computer operators.

Since I'm in that second group, I was wondering if I could improve my overall fitness, or at least my posture and back muscles, by switching to a stand-up workstation. I'm pretty active away from work; I do lots of walking and several days a week of o-lifting in addition to the odd WOD here and there. (Yes, one of my New Year's resolutions is more consistent WODs.)

I've heard different opinions regarding the standing workstation idea - one competitive oly lifter says it probably isn't as important as proper sitting posture, mostly on the theory that competitive lifters tend to stay off their feet when they're not in the gym...but then again, they might be in the gym eight hours a day, which I'm not, and then you have guys like Rulon Gardner, for whom twelve hours of throwing hay bales is an easy day. (Hi Kelly!)

I thought Coach Rut or Coach Wolf or someone around here experimented with a chairless computer workstation a while back, but I couldn't find anything on a quick search. I'm thinking the experiment had more to do with improving the squat than improving caloric output, though.

I'm leaning toward the "constantly active" group, if only because I think the lifter I asked may have underestimated her daily activity level, at least relative to us office-bound mortals. I think I understand and agree with Ben's point with regard to finding a balance, but the question about how active you have to be to keep your genes on your good side is a good one.

I've mentioned this before, but one of the funniest fitness-related things I ever saw was an old recruiting handbill from the wagon train days. It said something about how pleased the ladies would be with their figures after spending a couple months walking forty miles a day. Heh. They really could have sold it if they'd have mentioned the potential benefits of having to drag an ox by the nose out of an axle-deep mud wallow eight or ten times a day.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2005, 10:40 PM   #14
Rene Renteria
Member Rene Renteria is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: San Francisco  CA
Posts: 364
Mark, that reminded me of a news story I heard somewhere. This is it:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=4468682
"'...A person can expend calories either by going to the gym, or through everyday activities. Our study shows that the calories that people burn in their everyday activities -- their NEAT -- are far, far more important in obesity than we previously imagined.'"...

NEAT is "non-exercise activity thermogenesis." It seems that we have predispositions to the amount of activity (such as "fidgeting") that we do during the day. These can amount to a serious number of calories expended over time.

You can search on "levine NEAT obese" in PubMed to find several reviews about this. PubMed is here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi

For example, the abstract to the Science (sub. required) article says:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstra ct&list_uids=15681386&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docs um
Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Humans expend energy through purposeful exercise and through changes in posture and movement that are associated with the routines of daily life [called nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)]. To examine NEAT's role in obesity, we recruited 10 lean and 10 mildly obese sedentary volunteers and measured their body postures and movements every half-second for 10 days. Obese individuals were seated, on average, 2 hours longer per day than lean individuals. Posture allocation did not change when the obese individuals lost weight or when lean individuals gained weight, suggesting that it is biologically determined. If obese individuals adopted the NEAT-enhanced behaviors of their lean counterparts, they might expend an additional 350 calories (kcal) per day.
----

One of the abstracts gives a figure of 2000 kcal per day variation in caloric expenditure from NEAT for different individuals:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstra ct&list_uids=16026422&query_hl=1&itool=pubmed_docs um
Acta Physiol Scand. 2005 Aug;184(4):309-18. Related Articles, Links
Click here to read
NEAT--non-exercise activity thermogenesis--egocentric & geocentric environmental factors vs. biological regulation.

Levine JA, Kotz CM.

Endocrine Research Unit, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, USA. levine.james@mayo.edu

Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the energy expenditure of all physical activities other than volitional sporting-like exercise. NEAT includes all those activities that render us vibrant, unique and independent beings such as going to work, playing guitar, toe-tapping and dancing. The factors that account for the 2000 kcal day(-1) variability of NEAT can be categorized as environmental or biological. The environmental determinants of NEAT can be view using one of two models. In the egocentric model we consider a single person as the focus, e.g. 'my job'. In the geocentric model we consider the 'environment' as the focus, e.g. well-lit and safe walk ways. These models provide us with a theoretical framework to understand NEAT and how best to intervene to promote NEAT. As well as environmental effectors of NEAT, there are also biological regulatory mechanisms that enable us to account for three-quarters of the biological variance in susceptibility and resistance to fat gain with human over-feeding. NEAT is likely to be regulated through a central mechanism that integrates NEAT with energy intake and energy stores so that NEAT is activated with over-feeding and suppressed with under-feeding. In conclusion, NEAT is likely to serve as a crucial thermoregulatory switch between energy storage and dissipation that is biologically regulated and influenced, and perhaps over-ridden, by environment. Deciphering the role of NEAT may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of obesity.
----

Not much more to add. I have been using an exercise yoga inflatable ball thing to sit on at my desk in an effort to relieve some of the lack of circulation I was getting in my legs as my chair cut into my hamstrings and also to try to improve my posture by not giving myself a chairback to slouch on. I'm used to it now and think it is helping, but I do find that I'm leaving forward onto my elbows on my desk more now. "Can't win for trying" or whatever.

Happy New Year,
Rene'
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2005, 06:12 AM   #15
Larry Lindenman
Affiliate Larry Lindenman is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Chicago  Illinois
Posts: 2,769
Rene, that was pretty neat:wink:! Sorry.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2005, 11:58 AM   #16
Robert Wolf
Member Robert Wolf is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chico  CA
Posts: 2,669
Mark-

That is an interesting question aobut the standing workstation...I have tried to rig up somehting in which I can squat at my computer. I got the idea from a movie about kids competing in the national spelling B...this little girl whose family is from India had her computer on the floor and spent hours studying in a squat position. Sorry, I know this is not addressing the energy expenditure issue.

I think Russ's observations are right on. CF+some easy activities are likely in that optimum range.

Robb

  Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2005, 04:49 PM   #17
Mark Roughton
Member Mark Roughton is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Round Rock  TX
Posts: 128
Thanks Rene and Robb. Y'all may be familiar with a paper by Seth Roberts called "Surprises from Self-Experimentation: Sleep, Mood and Weight." Apparently, for the author, standing didn't help with weight loss but it helped his insomnia. I'm not sure that's what he expected. (The paper is pretty far-ranging, and it's a fun read. It provides some interesting insights on the value (and difficulty) of using oneself as a guinea pig: http://repositories.cdlib.org/postprints/405/.)

Clarence Bass seems to advocate intermittent high-intensity work along with lots of walking, too. I'm kind of getting the feeling that consistency and frequency are a couple of the underlying themes tying a lot of this together.

Take care, and Happy New Year!

  Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2005, 05:33 PM   #18
Roger Smith
Member Roger Smith is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Calgary  AB
Posts: 392
There are two kinds of "Breaks" at work. One involves rest and eating. That's what you should take if your job is construction, factory or somthing simular. The other is MOVE. That applies to almost all other jobs. IMO setting in a prison like building for 8 hours is too much for anyone to take. Even prisoners get out to the yard. I get up and out, usually for a good walk at every break. It amazes me the people at work that will set for 8 hours in front of a computer, and walk all of 50feet to the break room to set for breaks. Most of them are fat, the others will be soon (I've seen 100s of examples over the years) Even if I have the day off and nothing planned, I try to get outside and walk every few hours.

  Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2006, 05:24 AM   #19
John Frazer
Member John Frazer is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Northern Virginia  VA
Posts: 435
Taking off on Marc's comments, I agree that there's something different about hiking cross-country as opposed to "civilized" exercise.

A few years ago I went hunting in northern Maine with a friend from college. He doesn't "work out" and had put on some weight since having back surgery; I'd just completed a Marathon, so thought I was in shape.

I ate his dust for the first 2-3 days. Why? Because he's a forester for a timber company, and spends 5 days a week at work, 49 weeks a year, walking up and down hills, climbing over blowdowns, pushing through hardwood whips, and so on. The other three weeks, and on the weekends, he hunts and fishes in the same stuff. Specific preparation.

John
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2006, 07:57 AM   #20
Alexander Karatis
Member Alexander Karatis is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Athens  Attica, Greece
Posts: 786
Here's my take in this...

After Crossfit I have been MUCH more enthused about learning and re-learning new and old sports. Mastering one or two and being proficient in others is one of the most fulfilling aspects in my life. Most of my close buddies are rather lazy too and find my constant drive for physical activities as "weird" (in a funny-playful way).

I have other close friends who share my passion for activities and sports so that's who I turn to for sporting company. I'm also rather lucky to have met this new girl who just LOVES sports and activities and who actually likes the fact that I'm crazy about this lifestyle too, so things have been working rather well.

Besides sports I may play here and there, I too to waterskiing (slalom) again after an absence of 11 years from the sport and have already placed some pretty cocky bets regarding where my performance should be come next November.

Being 100% physically able for the sport made feel very good. Mastering the sport, is taking that "very good" feeling to whole other level...

Athleticism just ROCKS!
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Natural Promotors for Gene Expression Steve Liberati Nutrition 0 10-16-2006 02:21 PM
Good article on IF and gene expression Neal Winkler Nutrition 4 08-31-2006 06:53 PM
Article in NYT today re genes (and gene expression) Elliot Royce Injuries 2 08-31-2006 02:57 PM
Gene Expression Steve Liberati Nutrition 10 06-06-2006 06:00 PM
Gene Expression? Daniel Miller Nutrition 18 04-26-2006 07:27 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:03 PM.


CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.