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Old 04-16-2008, 04:42 PM   #1
Ken Mindoro
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Making lactose-free milk

I just came up with the idea of putting a "dairy digestive supplement" (Lactaid) into a gallon of regular milk in order to turn it into a lactose free milk. Has anyone tried this yet? The enzyme might not be as active in a cold refrigerator so I'll probably have to let it sit in the fridge for a day or two. If this works, I can go back to buying regular milk again.
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Old 04-16-2008, 06:55 PM   #2
Skylar Cook
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Re: Making lactose-free milk

Might work, not familiar with what's in lactaid. Alternatively, you could just buy some lactase (probably the active ingredient) and add it. You wouldn't need too much per gallon. Assuming lactaid is the stuff you drink or swallow with milk...

Thing is, if lactase is the active ingredient in lactaid, it's hardly going to do anything at 40 degrees F or wherever your fridge is set at. Lactase was evolved into our digestive system to work at an optimum temperature of 100 or so degrees F (lactaid is designed to work at that temp, too). Get it down to 40 and it'll slow down and possibly denature. Also, the stuff in lactaid might be formulated to work in highly acidic conditions, so it may not be as effective outside of our stomachs (unless you have some hardcore milk).

That said, if you can get some dilute (or stronger, if you can find it) hydrochloric acid and add it to the milk (boil it down - in a glass container - so you don't dilute the milk too much), then add some sodium hydroxide to neutralize it after the lactase has done it's job. You're also probably safe leaving the milk out at room temp for a few hours if it's been pasteurized, the enzymes will work better closer to room temp. Or heat it on the stove then add a little acid and the lactaid.

Not trying to dissuade you - I think it's a great idea and really hope it works, but there's a lot of negative possibilities. Make sure to shake it up now and then for "trial 1" (lactaid in the carton in the fridge). Luck!

Come to think of it, isn't there a product out there that does just what you're looking for? Someone's got to make it. It wouldn't be THAT hard to formulate a lactase variant that still functions at lower temps.
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Last edited by Skylar Cook : 04-16-2008 at 06:57 PM.
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Old 04-17-2008, 04:12 AM   #3
Robert Olajos
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Re: Making lactose-free milk

I'm lactose intolerant and have found two solutions which seem to me to be much easier than making your milk in a lab.

1) Skip milk, or
2) Swallow lactaid tablets just before consuming dairy. Then you get your lactase in the right environment to do its job, no beekers required.

If you really, really, really want to experiment, why not grind up some lactaid with a mortar and pestle, dump it into the milk, then see what happens.
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Old 04-25-2008, 10:48 AM   #4
Ken Mindoro
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Re: Making lactose-free milk

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Olajos View Post
I'm lactose intolerant and have found two solutions which seem to me to be much easier than making your milk in a lab.

1) Skip milk, or
2) Swallow lactaid tablets just before consuming dairy. Then you get your lactase in the right environment to do its job, no beekers required.

If you really, really, really want to experiment, why not grind up some lactaid with a mortar and pestle, dump it into the milk, then see what happens.

I did exactly this. I ground 2 lactaid tablets and mixed them into a gallon of whole milk. I let it sit in the fridge for 3 days. I've finished a few glasses of milk so far without any adverse effects. This is alot easier than having to take a couple tablets with each glass, and is alot cheaper than having to buy the Lactaid brand milk.
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Old 04-25-2008, 02:27 PM   #5
Steve Liberati
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Re: Making lactose-free milk

I'm lactose intolerant and regularly drink raw milk with no problem. Raw milk has the enzyme lactase (unlike pastuerized milk since pastuerization kills the good bacteria and good enzymes) which allows your body to break down lactose.

Besides, raw milk (especially kefir) is much tastier in my opinion than that sugar water crap ppl call milk.
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Old 04-26-2008, 01:53 PM   #6
Anthony DiSarro
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Re: Making lactose-free milk

why not not just buy Lactaid milk. It's available in my grocery store in 1/2 gallon sizes in no fat, low fat and whole varieties...
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