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Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

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Old 04-01-2012, 01:09 PM   #1
Jonathan E McGarvey
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Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

The answer could be face-palm obvious, but I'm curious why.

Deloading means dropping or lightening your routines for about a week every month or two to give your whole system time to recover.

If this is necessary, why can't we space out workouts instead? i.e. if our bodies accumulate fatigue that requires 25% rest (every 4th week or whatever), how is it not the same to simply take a rest day every 4th day? What's the difference?
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Old 04-01-2012, 01:18 PM   #2
Richard Colon
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

the rest aspect of a deload in which you allow your body/cns whatever time to get back to homeostasis by having an ENTIRE weak of significantly lighter loads is quite different than going intense balls to the wall for 2-3days straight followed by an entire rest day, followed by 2-3 days straight of balls to the wall.

The body is constantly trying to get back to homestasis even during that single rest day and most likely isn't there in 1 day. Next day, you crush it again. Thats why certain training can create weight loss and calorie burn even after you stop working out. The body is still using energy to bring it back down to normal.

I just see it as a 168hrs (week of deload) vs. 24-48hrs to allow this to happen. Big difference.
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Old 04-01-2012, 02:00 PM   #3
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

What's the difference between working 4 day weeks for a month, and taking a week's vacation? Same idea.

Katherine
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Old 04-01-2012, 03:52 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

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Originally Posted by Jonathan E McGarvey View Post
The answer could be face-palm obvious, but I'm curious why.

Deloading means dropping or lightening your routines for about a week every month or two to give your whole system time to recover.

If this is necessary, why can't we space out workouts instead? i.e. if our bodies accumulate fatigue that requires 25% rest (every 4th week or whatever), how is it not the same to simply take a rest day every 4th day? What's the difference?
What you do for deloaded depends upon your goals.

That is one way of deloading, but can be ineffective if you need to super compensate a lot
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Old 04-02-2012, 12:26 PM   #5
Jonathan E McGarvey
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
What's the difference between working 4 day weeks for a month, and taking a week's vacation? Same idea.

Katherine
I would consider this more of a psychological application, but it makes sense. Recovery happens on multiple levels (such as systemic as opposed to muscular) and they happen at different rates?
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Old 04-02-2012, 01:01 PM   #6
Katherine Derbyshire
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

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Originally Posted by Jonathan E McGarvey View Post
I would consider this more of a psychological application, but it makes sense. Recovery happens on multiple levels (such as systemic as opposed to muscular) and they happen at different rates?
Right, plus you have accumulated damage and fatigue. If you're seriously worn out -- mentally or physically -- one day off isn't enough time to completely recover, so you'll go into your next 3 day cycle a little behind the curve. And then a little further behind for the next one, and so on.

Katherine
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Old 04-02-2012, 01:36 PM   #7
Jonathan E McGarvey
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

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Originally Posted by Katherine Derbyshire View Post
Right, plus you have accumulated damage and fatigue. If you're seriously worn out -- mentally or physically -- one day off isn't enough time to completely recover, so you'll go into your next 3 day cycle a little behind the curve. And then a little further behind for the next one, and so on.

Katherine
My argument was that accumulation could be mitigated by spreading the work load, but this does not work because of longer term recovery needs. I'm still wondering if there's something at work here that none of us understand. It seems that recovery simply can't be reduced to a "full tank" "empty tank" analogy---that successive training days don't simply add equal increments to one's "recovery deficit". And then there's the element of degraded performance on multiple layers I brought up before...
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Old 04-02-2012, 01:47 PM   #8
Thom Wendelboe
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

Some people actually like being in the gym everyday and deloading lets them up the volume....
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:08 PM   #9
Jonathan E McGarvey
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

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Originally Posted by Thom Wendelboe View Post
Some people actually like being in the gym everyday and deloading lets them up the volume....
haha I agree... it's mostly that my OCD gene keeps screaming that there has to be a perfect equilibrium in everything.
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Old 04-02-2012, 03:12 PM   #10
Donald Lee
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Re: Why deloading instead of adjusting frequency?

The fitter you get the larger the stimulus required to achieve greater levels of fitness. When you're a beginner, you can make improvements workout to workout, then it becomes week to week, etc.

Some protocols have you accumulating large amounts of fatigue on purpose and then having the fitness gains show up later. To the extreme, it can be done with short bouts of overreaching. Some other approaches (block training) will accumulate fatigue in a certain motor quality before moving on to train another motor quality, and they utilize the long-term delayed training effect (LTDTE) to obtain optimal fitness for their competition at the right time.

You could go the extreme of some HIT folks and workout once every 7-10 days and go to extreme failure, but this method doesn't usually work without drugs and isn't even optimal with drugs.

On a cellular/molecular level, more frequency equates to more frequent bouts of the genes being expressed that you desire from your training.
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