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Old 06-27-2008, 12:34 PM   #1
Gary Ohm
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Psychology of kipping

Yet another pullup question.....

I read the 11 page discussion on kip pullups. I think I understand it all, but I may be paralyzed since I analyzed. Anyway, when I try to kip pullup, I have a real hard time hitting the bottom extension. I am apprehensive that my shoulders are going to pop out. I am having a hard time just dropping, much less pushing myself away from the bar. I keep alot of tension in my shoulders and I actually feel myself damping the drop when I know should be using that momentum to start my next swing. Sometimes I even keep tension in my arms as well.
Has anyone else had this experience? I am hoping that after hundreds and hundreds of reps it will all just kind of fall in place. Are there any "secrets" to getting around this?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:20 PM   #2
Roger Harrell
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Re: Psychology of kipping

It's good to be wary about your shoulders when first starting kipping PU. It's likely they are not strong enough to really power through them. Start slow. Get the feel for the bottom, then ramp up intensity. Gradual progress.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:33 PM   #3
Christopher G. Woods
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Re: Psychology of kipping

The trick is to bring your arms to full extension before you get to the bottom; that's the main purpose of pushing away from the bar at the top. You should be pushing away from the bar horizontally, so your arms come to full extension as you begin dropping vertically and then swinging through. That way, when you're at the lowest part of the pullup your movement is horizontal instead of vertical.
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:11 PM   #4
Michael Gilkerson
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Re: Psychology of kipping

I learned how to kip in Marine boot camp and it does take some time to "break through." I started out doing about 6 dead hang pullups and as time went by I started to see improvement, until I just got on a roll and was able to kip until my grip would weaken. My grip was a limiting factor for awhile, but once I developed more grip strength I was maxing my pullups.

I still remember the day I did 20 pullups for the first time; I was so stoked that I did a cartwheel and boy did that fire up the Drill Instructors. It was worth the minor torture I had to endure. I ended up being able to do 34 pullups by the end of bootcamp.

Keep rocking and you will get there. I would also suggest that you just relax and try to find the groove. I didn't think about pushing away from the bar; I think about getting my chest out front and my feet back and once I hit that position, I think reverse as hard as I can. Hope that helps.
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:18 PM   #5
Gary Ohm
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Re: Psychology of kipping

Great advice folks. Thank you very much. I am stuck here at work, so all I can do is think about pullups. I can do dead hangs in several places here, but if I started trying to kip, well, the walls would come crumbling down.

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Old 06-27-2008, 04:15 PM   #6
Camille Lore
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Re: Psychology of kipping

I seem to be fixated on arcs and conservation of motion. I just get into the swing and following an arc and the motion comes.
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:36 PM   #7
Karin Jonczak
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Re: Psychology of kipping

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher G. Woods View Post
The trick is to bring your arms to full extension before you get to the bottom; that's the main purpose of pushing away from the bar at the top. You should be pushing away from the bar horizontally, so your arms come to full extension as you begin dropping vertically and then swinging through. That way, when you're at the lowest part of the pullup your movement is horizontal instead of vertical.
Never thought of it that way... thank you, it was enlightening!! (though my body likes to butterfly kip for some reason, I keep trying to figure out the swing kip too!)

Karin
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:39 PM   #8
Christopher G. Woods
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Re: Psychology of kipping

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Originally Posted by Karin Kellerman View Post
Never thought of it that way... thank you, it was enlightening!! (though my body likes to butterfly kip for some reason, I keep trying to figure out the swing kip too!)

Karin
Actually, the butterfly kip uses a similar principle, only reversed. At the top of the butterfly kip you should be pulling yourself toward the bar horizontally and then sliding under the bar as you start to descend. Again, you want to bring your arms to full extension before you reach the bottom, only your weight is now out in front of the bar instead of behind it. This allows you to move right into the back swing and explode your hips into the next rep.
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Old 06-27-2008, 09:05 PM   #9
Robert Callahan
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Re: Psychology of kipping

Keep your lats tight as you come down in order to maintain shoulder stability. It is also called keeping an "active shoulder". If you just go completely limp it will put unnecessary strain on your shoulders and that is bad, you just need to figure out which muscles to keep tight. Just search active shoulders on pull-ups and youll probably find better descriptions than i could give here.

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Old 07-01-2008, 09:43 AM   #10
Ryan Blair
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Re: Psychology of kipping

I have been in exactly the same spot. I was really wary of dropping into the kip and still don't fully drop into it. Roger's advice is spot on, the more I do the better they get. Right now I drop 3/4 of the way then slow way down to the full extention. I used to slow way down, now it's just a bit. It might also help to just get a good strong kip going without the pull up. That way you can develop a feel for the kind of stress involved with the bottom of the movement. Don't be in a rush.
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