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Old 08-08-2008, 06:50 PM   #1
Zeeshan Parvez
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Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

If you are in the army is your strength to weight ratio more important or brute strength? Or does it depend on your position?
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Old 08-08-2008, 07:19 PM   #2
Gavin Harrison
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

Seems like most military folks are pretty thin, seems like strength endurance is the primary concern. Having to run/walk long distances carrying a filled pack, gun, munitions, etc. Of course, each branch is different, but in general, I think strength endurance is king, rather than absolute or relative strength.
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Old 08-08-2008, 07:37 PM   #3
Blair Robert Lowe
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

I think this depends if you are a grunt or some form of elite team ( SeAL, SOG, SF, Ranger, PT, etc ).

I would think not one and not the other. You still have to able to carry a ton of crap for long distances and sometimes a ton of crap for distance in a hurry.

Being a metabolic machine is a good idea but not at the expense of BW and brute strength should you need to go H2H. Most grunts do not have a lot of time spent in H2H, so it's not a bad idea to be strong with lots of energy to be used available.
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Old 08-09-2008, 08:31 AM   #4
Charles Bennington
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

Honestly, speaking from experience, the average military personnel is quite weak as well as under conditioned (IMHO.)

However, looking at the details w/f/s http://usmilitary.about.com/od/army/a/afpt.htm you can see that strength endurance is what it all revolves around. Absolute strength is a non-entity.
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:14 AM   #5
Stephen Smith
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

It's good to know that I could score a 300 on the APFT for my age right now, and with a little work on my running I'll be able to score a 300 for the 17-21 age group!

Pretty much what everyone said is right on... At least the Army has regular PT though, so fitness is somewhat of a priority. In the Navy, most people worked out twice a year, and just struggled through the PFT with barely passing scores.
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:33 PM   #6
Ed Haywood
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

I recently retired after 20 years in the Army, 15 of that in SF. I got this one.

Mostly you need mental strength ... the ability to force yourself to keep going and never quit or slow down, no matter how bad it gets, and to keep a clear head while doing it. The selection courses for all Army SOF units are variations on the same basic theme: walking a long way, in rough terrain, with a heavy load, while doing mentally challenging tasks. The guys who can't push themselves to set or keep the pace, or who make mistakes when tired, are not accepted.

Beyond that, once in the service there are such a wide variety of challenges that there is no way to generalize. In training you will run, walk, do bodyweight exercises, do obstacle courses, carry heavy loads, lift heavy objects, carry each other, etc. In combat you'll do all the same things, only harder and while more tired.

So theoretically anybody CAN make it, regardless of size, strength, body type, etc. In reality, balanced athletic ability stands the best chance. If you are butt strong but overweight, you're going to have a hard time with endurance events. If you are an aerobic machine but wispy thin, you're going to struggle with heavy loads. In general, within normal ranges of size and strength, bodyweight strength and muscular endurance are more important than brute strength.

The only thing that is non-negotiable is the ability to move all day with your gear on. Body armor, helmet, weapons, ammo, radio, first aid kit, and misc stuff will add up to somewhere between 65 and 100 lbs of stuff strapped to you. You gotta be able to move around with that stuff on for 24, 48, 72 hours without rest, and remain alert and functional, and be able to move fast in it when the situation demands. The only thing that has ever made me gasp for air more than Fran was sprinting the length of a Baghdad block in full gear. And talk about a sore lower back!

I think crossfit is pretty good preparation, though perhaps with some more endurance training. My unscientific opinion is that an aerobic base is essential to keeping up on long ops and movements. I've never known a successful soldier, Marine, or SEAL who was not a decent runner. "Decent runner" would be defined as 5 miles at an 8 minute pace.
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Old 08-09-2008, 06:04 PM   #7
Zeeshan Parvez
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Re: Relative strength for an army personal or brute strength...

So I guess it would be safe to say that the best way to train for the army would be to build brute strength and at the same time increase your relative strength. Ronnie Collman doing planche push ups and the iron cross and running 10 miles daily. Not bad!
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