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Old 10-17-2003, 01:10 PM   #1
Alexander Karatis
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Well, I could feel it coming for the past 2 weeks but today I really hit it. I am simply am dog-tired, cowardly to the point that I look at the pull-up bar like its gonna bite me, and I'm hurting. My muscles, my joints, my heart's pumping like crazy...I feel like a wimp.

The part of my training where I'd warm up and be all fired up to crush whatever exercise I'm about to do, is now the part where I know I'm gonna quit in 10 minutes. It's been getting worse and worse every time and it now really feels like a downward spiral.

I can't for the life of me put my finger on what's wrong but I'll give you guys some facts to get you started:

A. I've been training intensely for the past 5 months. (and I need at least a week off-doing nothing) ???

B. My gradual shift to a paleo diet could be showing its effects now???. However I still get plenty of good carbs.

C. I don't have a pre-workout meal-I still get plenty of calories throughout the day though.

D. I should stop training at night. (Although I've been doing it like this for quite some time).

E. On and off I have been experimenting with cutting carbs from my post-workout meal, and that could mean that my muscles don't recover properly (???). Although it will be a while since I hit the same muscle group again...

All this with an even lesser activity level than before so it's not like something else is tirin me...Oh, AND although I stopped drinking coffee months ago, I started again just to see if it will give me some extra push...

You want the real kicker? I've been sleeping more and more, from my usual 6-7 hours to an average of 9 (!)

Right now, it's complicated and confusing in my mind. I'm sure you guys will probably see the problem clearer than I, and have oodles of experience to offer!(You really get ****ed when you can't perform at the one thing you really look forward to during your day)...


Anyway, sorry for the long rant :-)
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Old 10-17-2003, 02:04 PM   #2
wells
 
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Back in highschool, the same thing would happen to me in the middle of football and lacrosse seasons (and sometimes even summer lifting which was pretty intense) and continue on to the end. I would just start being tired all the time, and I would absolutely DREAD going to practices (especially those early in the week practices where you know there'd be sprints at the end). My body just felt like a sack of potatoes. I'd be able to get exited for games, especially in lacrosse season, but I think that was more adrenaline than anything else.

My diet at the time was about the worst thing you could think of. I was living with my dad and he is a vegetarian: we mostly ate huge amounts of cheese, potatoes, bread, and pasta. Those really were what we ate day in, day out(pizza was almost a staple). The fruit and vegetable aspects weren't too good. Later on in high school I started eating alot more meat, and things improved somewhat. But I digress.

If you are eating paleo then you probably aren't doing much wrong diet wise. Maybe try adding more fats (medium chain saturated fats like coconut oil are supposed to be great for giving you energy). But from all the facts you listed, the training intensly for five months really stands out. Everyone needs a break. They say one of the sure-fire ways of seeing that you are overtraining is when you lose your desire to work out. I'd say take 1 or 2 weeks off. You don't have to just sit around, do stuff that is more fun than rounds of deadlifts, 400 m sprints, and pull-ups for time. Play basketball or frisbee with your buddies, go hiking, play your favorite sport. Do stuff that is fun and active but doesn't tax your body greatly. I bet you'd feel better and return to crossfit feeling good.
-wells
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Old 10-17-2003, 04:15 PM   #3
Robert Wolf
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Alexander-

If you are following the WOD you CAN NOT light it up evry day. We look for intensity but in an intermittant fashion. The WOD, as posted, will kill someone in a month if they "give it their all" every day. If you are doing additional activity on top of this regulating your intensity is even more important. Many of the days must be approached as technique oriented or active rest...moving throught the traing without "pushing".

Keep me posted
Robb
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Old 10-17-2003, 04:54 PM   #4
Kevin Roddy
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Yeah man, if you're that tired, just take a break, or lighten the load for a week or two. There's nothing wrong with rest, the body needs it and loves it. Don't deny your body something it loves. :kiss:

Trust me, I know how you feel.. 3+ hours of gymnastics a day, plus the WOD. It's crazy, but every time I get down or tired, I just think "Come on, man, you're a Crossfit athlete! You can do it, I know you can!" Sounds cheesy, but it works.
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Old 10-19-2003, 09:03 AM   #5
Alexander Karatis
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Robert, Kevin, Wells,

your advice is dearly appreciated, and i too think that in the end, why NOT rest for a week. I suppose that in the beginning that whole "What?! me, quit?!" is a bit taxing to the ego but I can't think of a wiser choice than a week of lighter more "fun" activities.

Should I "hit it hard" when I'm back in action or would you reccomend a smoother transition?

(Damn it this whole conversation makes me feel like I'm injured or something-which I realize that I could very well be, had I stubbornly continued in this fashion with no break whatsoever.)

Thanks again guys. That made me feel more "mortal":happy:
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Old 10-19-2003, 09:08 AM   #6
Kevin Roddy
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When you come back, I would say to do whatever feels right. If you're well rested and raring to go, there's no reason not to give it 100%. If you still feel kinda iffy, go light for a couple days, then hit it hard later on.
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Old 10-19-2003, 02:03 PM   #7
Robert Wolf
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Alexander-

Remember variety! We can not program that into the WOD. It is up to each individual to really modulate their intensity to make gains without killing themselves.
Robb
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Old 10-20-2003, 10:33 AM   #8
Alexander Karatis
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Rob,

Modulate intensity? I thought this was more of an on/off idea...

i.e. You're either training (always intensely) or resting.

And from there you decide on how much rest your body will need with that intensity...
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Old 10-20-2003, 11:28 AM   #9
Dan John
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I plan five off days after every three weeks. Often, I max the sixth day and discover that those five days were as valuable as training. I learned about this years ago from a Soviet thrower who argued that the single biggest problem with American throwers was chronic overtraining. Bondurchuk had an interesting training idea of going 100% one week, 80% in both volume and intensity and "15%" the third week...active rest of volleyball, swimming and fun stuff. It was called "load leaping," and the idea was to keep trying to pop up on the week after the 15% training with bigger P.R.s.

There is a book called "Consistent Winning" that talks about what you are trying to do with long term, no stop training. The author argues for several total rest days in the middle of severe training.

Recently, I went down to Las Vegas to compete against two of my good friends, Mike and Mindy. They have been training double sessions since June to prep up for a run at 2004 (Olympics). They have really improved their technique and ability to handle a load, but when the ring judge called their name, you could see that the long haul had eroded their ability to "snap." Whether the muscles had lost their stretch reflex or their nervous system just couldn't rewire a big throw, both struggled with nailing a big mark.

So, if you are in a sport that demands high performance, you need to take time off in some kind of intelligent plan to relax and reload. You could probably just keep putting in workouts, but you seem to have found the problem with that already.

If you do the WOD here, truly do the rest day as a rest day. Of course, if you are overtrained (high morning pulse, flu-like feelings, lethargy, generally ****ed off, trouble relaxing and sleeping, difficulty concentration), you may need more than a day or two. The Soviets used to take two months (!!!) of active rest before starting a new year. Today, many O lifters will take a full year off of training (that is serious) before starting a three year push towards the Olympics.

It usually all gets back to your goals. As a thrower, I have some built in things (the season, for example) that allows me to float my training up and down. Maybe you could find a natural way to do this in your training.
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Old 10-20-2003, 05:53 PM   #10
Robert Wolf
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Yup, what Dan said!!!
Robb
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