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Old 08-29-2006, 03:54 AM   #1
Chris Williams
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I'm looking for some advice as i've just been diagnosed with mild, early stage arthritis (in the knee), due to previous injuries/ accidents.

X-fit (& the message board) really helped me get over ligament & cartilage injury in the past, so any ideas over how to get round this one??

I've searched the archives, and one post seemed to suggest that X-fit has helped with his arthritis. I'd be keen to get any feedback that anyone has got, such as what exercises to avoid (jogging on concrete i guess), what exercises to do, supplements to take etc.

Is it realistic of me to think that x-fit will protect my knee enough to continue "bad" activities such as jogging/ skiing?

If my knee is sore, should i stop, or can i keep going through the pain?
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Old 08-29-2006, 05:08 AM   #2
Ben Kaminski
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If you're not already, try supplementing your diet with glucosamine/chondroitin. Calcium might be wise as well, and omega 3's of course to tackle inflammation. I think your diet can be a powerful factor against your condition.

If you plan to run, look into the POSE method of running (try a search on this forum). It is much easier on the knees than other forms of running. It also strengthens the legs to take stress off the knees in other activities.
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Old 08-29-2006, 05:22 AM   #3
Craig Van De Walker
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I'm no expert, but I would cut out the jogging now. If you are a typical heel striker you are probably slamming your knees good "jogging". You are young, those knees need to last a while longer!

If deep BW squats don't hurt, I would work on them a lot as well as deadlifts. Strengthen your hamstrings and glutes. Spend more time on upper body when your knee is painful. Row, swim or bike if you feel the need to do distance work.

I have heard about supplementing with chondroitin sulfate (sp?). I'm sure Garrett or someone else an chime in on the supplement part.

If your knee gets better after some time you could learn "pose running", look it up online. Good luck.

Skiing is not bad IMO there is risk of trauma but I don't personally think of it as damaging, jogging on the other hand IMO (because it is done to extremes, many times with poor technique probably damages lots of knees)
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Old 08-29-2006, 05:40 AM   #4
Elliot Royce
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Chris:

sorry to hear about the OA diagnosis...since it's mild, it may never become a big issue. Most people get OA sooner or later...it's basically wear and tear.

I had double hip arthritis and had to replace my hips. Some of my advice would be:

definitely go for the glucosamine/chondroitin + get some with MSM. Some will tell you that studies have shown no benefit from this stuff...I disagree completely. Really helped for me.

you could look into HgH injections into the knee...also Synvisc to reduce pain. The HgH may encourage cartilage growth but this is unproven.

Avoid high impact sports. I'd drop the running. If people realized how much damage running can do over a lifetime, they'd never do it. Skating, elliptical, stairmaster, rowing, etc. -- there are so many good alternatives.

Pain is not a perfect guide. Sure, you don't want to work through incredible pain but unfortunately you will have to learn to live with pain. Don't let it prevent you from exercising and living your life. That is the crappy part about OA: learning to live with pain. There are various painkillers that your doctor can talk to you about.

Stretching, yoga, etc. are critical. I would keep up with the leg exercises. Very strong muscles around those knees are going to absorb shock and help you. I'd keep up the squats, etc.

If you exercise and the pain does not go away within 24 hours after you stop or is intense, then don't do that exercise.

Let me know if you have other questions.
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Old 08-29-2006, 07:29 AM   #5
Chris Williams
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Thx for the advice. I'll look into the supplements you guys mentioned, and sounds as if running may have to stop, even though i've been trying the pose method (i'm not really addicted to it anyway).

Couple of questions:

Elliot, are you still as active now you've had joint replacements? I know it is early to be thinking about this, but if i did have a new knee in 10 years, would i still be able to ski?

Craig, i'm interested on your thoughts on skiing not being "bad" (apart from crashes obviously). Why do you think that? I suppose you get some heavy jolts especially in the moguls, but it is not as constant pounding as running.
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Old 08-29-2006, 02:48 PM   #6
Lynne Pitts
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Moving to Injuries/Medical.
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Old 08-29-2006, 03:47 PM   #7
Elliot Royce
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I had my hips resurfaced about 10 months ago so it's a bit early to tell what the long term prognosis is. I went back to ice hockey at 6 months and, while non-checking, we certainly do take spills. My surgeon says that everything's ok except marathon running. There are other hip patients who do pretty much every other sport including Ironman competitions.

Knees are different than hips. It's a less solid joint -- more like God's sense of humor at work -- than a hip. But I don't see why you couldn't get back to skiing. I don't know that you'll be pounding moguls (if that's what you call it) but skiing should be mostly low impact.

The main problem seems to be continuous high impact sports like basketball or running. But I'm not a knee expert. If you want to see what my surgeon does for knees, check out www.grossortho.com. He's world renowned for hips -- don't know about hips.
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Old 08-30-2006, 06:22 AM   #8
Craig Van De Walker
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Chris,
(IMO) I guess part of it is that most people cannot ski everyday year round, I know people who run that often. I beleive it is actually lower impact, I board and my knees are never straight. After boarding my legs may be sore, and the muscles supporting my knees but not my knees? I ran 6 miles 5 days a week in formation in the Army for a couple of years, my knees hurt then and I was only 19 or 20. I have hated LSD running ever since (sprints are OK). Luckily my knees are fine now.
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