CrossFit Discussion Board  

Go Back   CrossFit Discussion Board > CrossFit Forum > Fitness
CrossFit Home Forum Site Rules CrossFit FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Fitness Theory and Practice. CrossFit's rationale & foundations. Who is fit? What is fitness?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-29-2007, 03:16 PM   #1
Shawn Hultquist
Member Shawn Hultquist is offline
 
Shawn Hultquist's Avatar
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: St Johns  FL
Posts: 137
CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

Hey guys and gals just wondering what some of your thoughs are about training for high altitudes and high altitude sickness? I will be going to the Rocky Mountains next year for a two week long hike. How would one go about training for this is my main question? I would like to just continue CF and thought about running later in the day kind of like two-a-days in football practice. Also what can be done to prevent high altitude sickness?

Thanks
Shawn
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 04:51 AM   #2
Nick Cummings
Departed Nick Cummings is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Sep 2005
 
Posts: 1,023
Re: CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

I do a yearly week hike in the Rocky Mountains. All we really do is take it easy the first day, or maybe 2. I know someone posted a snorkel like device to workout with that was supposed to stimulate higher alttitudes by reducing the ammount of oxygen that each breath provides.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 08:52 AM   #3
Kevin McMillan
Member Kevin McMillan is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Wolfville  Nova Scotia
Posts: 125
Re: CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

ill fire up a few journals that are published, but current thoughts of altitude training are that living high and trainign low... so hypoxic tents for sleep illicits a higher response and aility to train at maximal forces. this is for the lay non-altitude person. those who live year round at altitude dont have the negative maxi force generation as do coasters when at altitude. 1-2 weeks max training camps at altitude at a time do help however, just you cant train at your 100% due to decreases in anaerobic capacity (buffer system)
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 01:15 PM   #4
Billy Norwood
Member Billy Norwood is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: denver  colorado
Posts: 9
Re: CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

Drink lots of water. It is also very dry up in this region. Yeah, take it light the first day but do make yourself breathe a little hard. Ive found, since ive moved back and forth from Colorado to texas to cali that if i push myself a little when i first get in i adapt faster.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2007, 03:57 PM   #5
Andrew J. Roberts
Member Andrew J. Roberts is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: USAF Academy  CO
Posts: 28
Re: CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Hultquist View Post
Hey guys and gals just wondering what some of your thoughs are about training for high altitudes and high altitude sickness? I will be going to the Rocky Mountains next year for a two week long hike. How would one go about training for this is my main question? I would like to just continue CF and thought about running later in the day kind of like two-a-days in football practice. Also what can be done to prevent high altitude sickness?

Thanks
Shawn
I grew up near sea level but military training has brought me to 7000+' ASL. In addition I train rigorously on my own and have held billets responsible for physically conditioning newcomers. As mentioned 1) hydrate frequently 2) eat more, specifically carbohydrates. The latter is not scientifically substantiated, but from experience I have found incrase carbohydrate intake about 10% helps offset fatigue/tiredness.

A study done last year at our Human Perfromance Labratory indicated that the common held belief that a person adapts to altitude in approximately six weeks may be far off. In fact, their initial research showed that it may take well up to a year which matches my own experience.

Just take it easy and enjoy... remeber, there is much to be gained from some time off if you can get past the rudimentary guilt we, who are serious about training, always experience.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2007, 02:32 AM   #6
Joshua Kemper
Member Joshua Kemper is offline
 
Profile:
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: La Mesa  CA
Posts: 18
Re: CF at sea level VS. 11,000 feet

Shawn: If you're doing the WOD as rx'ed, you should be very well prepared for a two week hike in the Rockies.

Have you ever been at elevation above 8000'? Familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of AMS (acute mountain sickness) and appropriate preventative measures. Ascend gradually, hydrate, eat. If you're eating Zone, I'd check out Rob Miller's suggestions on eating Zone in the woods (or on a wall!). Get your fish oil. Avoid alcohol. Diamox will help, but it would be silly to take at only 11000' unless someone in your group has known issues with AMS, HACE or HAPE.

Richard Hidalgo (Crossfit Peru) very recently climbed 8000+ meter peak Cho Oyu with CF as his conditioning program.

I am sure there are folks on this board who can weigh in a bit more definitively on this... if not, check out all the CF talk on the forums at summitpost.org.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Training @ sea level for a marathon @ altitude Tim Donahey Fitness 7 09-14-2007 05:58 AM
A sea of fat! Brandon Oto Nutrition 8 08-30-2007 09:23 AM
10,000 pound challenge David Wood Competitions 35 04-10-2007 06:01 PM
Sea salt Daniel Doiron Nutrition 4 02-14-2006 06:45 AM
1,000 lb squat challenge Frank DiMeo Competitions 3 01-13-2006 10:16 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
CrossFit is a registered trademark of CrossFit Inc.