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Old 01-29-2012, 02:38 PM   #1
Bryan Rowland
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Elevation mask input

I have thought about getting a gas mask for a little bit. I just seen rouge starting to sell the elevation mask. Any idea or input on the worth of this type of training?
http://www.roguefitness.com/elevatio...g-mask.php(wfs)
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Old 01-29-2012, 02:48 PM   #2
Brandon Tidwell
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Re: Elevation mask input

I would like to hear some feedback on these also
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Old 01-29-2012, 04:39 PM   #3
Richard Deyan
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Re: Elevation mask input

People use the mask and gas masks for training or make their own in order to try and simulate being at high altitude. All the mask does is make is harder to breathe. Being at a high altitude is beneficial because of the pressure difference, that's why it's hard to breathe. The mask does not create a difference in the air pressure around you. I don't personally believe the mask does what it's intended to do. If you want to make it more difficult to breathe just take a snorkel to your face for way cheaper. But I don't think the results are going to be beneficial to your body by creating a hypoxic environment in that manner.
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Old 01-30-2012, 06:35 AM   #4
Gene Pires
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Re: Elevation mask input

Would be worth getting one just to freak people out at your local regular gym or grocery store. Come in wearing the death mask and toting a sledgehammer is so rad looking.
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Old 01-30-2012, 09:12 AM   #5
Shawn M Wilson
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Re: Elevation mask input

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Originally Posted by Gene Pires View Post
Would be worth getting one just to freak people out at your local regular gym or grocery store. Come in wearing the death mask and toting a sledgehammer is so rad looking.
Do that here in texas at a grocery store and expect to get shot by a local with their CHL.

Gym - yes Grocery store - No
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Old 01-30-2012, 02:04 PM   #6
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Elevation mask input

A gas mask does not simulate high altitude training. Snorkeling, maybe. But hypoxia? No, flat out. It will give your rib muscles a heck of a workout, if that's important to you.

The lungs expand to about 6 liters of space. In a deep space that's 6 liters of vacuum with 0 liters of oxygen. At sea level that's 6 liters of gas, which is about 1.25 liters of oxygen. At 1,500 meters elevation such as Denver, CO that's 6 liters of thin air, of which about 1 liter is oxygen. On the top of Mt. Everest it's about a half liter of oxygen. In all cases the lungs are fully expanded.

Red blood cells drive by the lungs like little bitty dump trucks (without brakes) looking to pick up gas molecules (oxygen usually, although they prefer carbon monoxide if it's available.) If there's only a liter of oxygen to pick up, they only pick up a liter of oxygen and then continue on their way. Some of the red blood cells will depart the pickup area (the lungs) with no oxygen at all. (If there's carbon monoxide available they pick that up instead and leave the oxygen behind, which is how CO poisoning works. You die of extreme hypoxia.)

A gas mask only makes it more difficult to expand the lungs. It gives the serratus and diaphragm muscles a workout. It does not change the total volume of oxygen in the expanded lungs. That is why a mask does not simulate high altitude hypoxia training.
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Old 01-30-2012, 02:19 PM   #7
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: Elevation mask input

More physiology of altitude training:

The normal reaction of the body to chronic thin air is to produce more red blood cells. More red blood cells means a more thorough scrubbing and removal of oxygen from the lungs. Some oxygen always eludes the red blood cells and escapes during expiration. Remember those little red blood cell dump trucks use a drive-by-and-don't-stop pickup process. This is why mouth-to-mouth rescue breathing helps -- there's always still some oxygen left in your exhalation. Note however that increasing the number of red blood cells will not completely solve the problem of thin air. You'll still perform worse at altitude than at sea level, just with less of a performance drop off.

The normal reaction to high altitude living and training does not include significant strengthening of the rib muscles.

As my buddy Dr. Mike Ray from Flagstaff, AZ (elevation 7,000 feet) would say, the ideal situation would be to train at sea level to bump up the training performance and to live at high altitude to bump up your red blood cell count. Live in Flagstaff, train in Phoenix.

Last edited by Lincoln Brigham : 01-30-2012 at 02:25 PM.
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Old 01-30-2012, 02:28 PM   #8
Frank E Morel
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Re: Elevation mask input

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
A gas mask does not simulate high altitude training. Snorkeling, maybe. But hypoxia? No, flat out. It will give your rib muscles a heck of a workout, if that's important to you.

The lungs expand to about 6 liters of space. In a deep space that's 6 liters of vacuum with 0 liters of oxygen. At sea level that's 6 liters of gas, which is about 1.25 liters of oxygen. At 1,500 meters elevation such as Denver, CO that's 6 liters of thin air, of which about 1 liter is oxygen. On the top of Mt. Everest it's about a half liter of oxygen. In all cases the lungs are fully expanded.

Red blood cells drive by the lungs like little bitty dump trucks (without brakes) looking to pick up gas molecules (oxygen usually, although they prefer carbon monoxide if it's available.) If there's only a liter of oxygen to pick up, they only pick up a liter of oxygen and then continue on their way. Some of the red blood cells will depart the pickup area (the lungs) with no oxygen at all. (If there's carbon monoxide available they pick that up instead and leave the oxygen behind, which is how CO poisoning works. You die of extreme hypoxia.)

A gas mask only makes it more difficult to expand the lungs. It gives the serratus and diaphragm muscles a workout. It does not change the total volume of oxygen in the expanded lungs. That is why a mask does not simulate high altitude hypoxia training.
+1.
You may strengthen your intercostal muscles abit due to excertion. Lung tissue is a elastic sack that stretch larger or smaller. They re not a muscle, their growth is dependent on the rib cage. Ask any one with emphysema, they rib cage changes size to compensate the poor lung performance.

A gas mask will help you learn better breathing control and get you to understand breathing patterns. But force the body to produce more red cells which really what happens at altitude. Nope, and learn to function in a hypoxic state ... You will compensate by taking bigger and longer breathes faster.

If you want to feel pain. Sleep in one for 8 hours .... Your belly aches for a couple of days. Ask any infantryman that has spent time in the mop suit.
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Last edited by Frank E Morel : 01-30-2012 at 02:31 PM.
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Old 01-31-2012, 11:10 AM   #9
Amy R. Kelly
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Re: Elevation mask input

You would get a better bang for your dollar with a hand held device like a powerlung done as its own exercise, they have more than three resistance settings. As far as performance, Wanderlei Silva used a mask in preparation for a fight and gassed out fast. He returned to his normal caveman training cutting out all the supposed scientific gimmicks.

Last edited by Amy R. Kelly : 01-31-2012 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 01-31-2012, 11:23 AM   #10
James Mazzarisi
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Re: Elevation mask input

Come visit us in Jackson Hole
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