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Old 05-08-2006, 09:30 PM   #1
Vanessa Sebastian Eugenio
 
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I have been doing crossfit for about 3 weeks and just recently signed up to run my first marathon in October. This may seem like a senseless question but can I increase the number of miles on the WOD? I am talking about a gradual increase because as I get closer to marathon day, we will go about 18-20 miles each run. Should I just do the long runs on the rest days?
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Old 05-08-2006, 10:24 PM   #2
Eugene R. Allen
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Vanessa,

CrossFit is a general program for elite fitness across a broad spectrum of fitness attributes. Long distance running is a bit outside the CF preparation box because it is so completely different from the CF methodology. Marathons are entirely aerobic and you will need lots and lots of miles under you belt to do your race and those miles are generally LSD miles.

Are you coming up for Portland? Great race if that's the one you're doing. Mostly flat and a great opportunity for a PR. Don't do Seattle, always cold and in November...November in Seattle, like it's going to be anything but wet and cold. Anyway back to your question: "...can I increase the number of miles on the WOD?" My dear you can do anything you want to...but remember that the long run is the key to your marathon training.

I would suggest at least one run 6 weeks or more before race day of 24 miles or so and taper back from there. You have plenty of time to train for your October race, coincidentally my wife is flying out to Washington DC for an October marathon with a college friend of hers. She does CF with me and it's hard to make her tired. Are you running 4 or 5 days a week with one long run, one paced or tempo run and some easy runs in between? Have you worked on nutrition and what you can get down 90 minutes into a run? Hal Higdon has written some great stuff on marathon training as has Jeff Galloway. I would look to them for training advice.

Just as a long steady run has precious little benefit for your Fran time, Chelsea and the other girls are not the best marathon training tools. Don't abandon CF by any means but realize that CF workouts are not marathon training workouts.

Have a great race.
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Old 05-08-2006, 11:04 PM   #3
Vanessa Sebastian Eugenio
 
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Eugene-

Thanks for the advice!

I am actually going to run in SF for the Nike womens Marathon-13 miles uphill/downhill and 13 miles of flat ground.

As far as training goes, we have not really started. Well not until the 20th of May. But I have been running 3-4 miles everyday for the past month. Again I am brand new to the whole concept of training for a long run so I might just take your advice.

I don't have a clue as to what I should be taking in. But I have started reading the Zone and applying it to everyday life. Fortunately I have been eating healthy all my life so adjusting to the Zone has not really been difficult for me! =)

Is your wife an ultra marathoner? One of the coaches of the program is an ultra marathoner. 100 miles in 27 hours. That is pretty hardcore! But hats off to your wife! You really have to have the patience and dedication like she has to do a marathon or triathalon. But I am going to try to work my way up there and I'll let you know how it goes!

Thanks again! :proud:
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Old 05-09-2006, 09:29 AM   #4
Jim Dunn
 
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Hi Vanessa,
Congratulations on deciding to run your first marathon! My wife does a marathon about every other year and is currently getting ready for the Rock and Roll marathon in San Diego. She likes to do weights and cross train but I know for her that as the training progresses she has to save as much of her energy as she can for her weekend long runs. She is using one of Higdon's training programs and it is working great for her. My wife and I also are on the Zone but she has found the need to reduce the vegetables and up the "bad" carbs (pasta, bagels,...) the day before her long run or she runs out of gas. The energy thing has been a source of frustration for her and she is still experimenting. Good luck to you! I ran my first marathon in DC a few years back (marine corps marathon) and it was an awesome experience!

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Old 05-09-2006, 10:30 AM   #5
Eugene R. Allen
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Vanessa - My wife and I have done quite a few races together with our best being a 3:37 at Portland. We did the Pacific Crest Half Marathon in 1:37 which has been our best race. I have not done the San Francisco Marathon but I have done Escape From Alcatraz 5 times and know that you can't run far in that city without going up and down lots of hills. I would imagine you will be going through the Presidio, it's very pretty there. I'm sure the course is very scenic...but hard.

You need to up your mileage a bit and make the distance of your "junk" miles about 6 or 7 miles rather than just 3 or 4. Get your once a week long run up over 10 ASAP and keep tacking on a bit each week. One caution though, don't add more than about 10% per week or you will invite overuse injuries.

Hopefully you are wearing good shoes appropriate for your type of foot. It's the only really important equipment you need, be sure to go to a running shoe store and get fitted for your running style and foot shape. Low, medium and high arched feet all need different types of shoes.

Consider looking into the Pose technique or running. Check out www.posetech.com. Dr. Romanov is to running what Terry Laughlin is to swimming. "Practice" your running, don't just slog along mindlessly. Don't oversride, land midfoot under your CG, lift your heels high in the back...don't drag your feet. Arms pump straight forward and back.

Consider some running strategy too. Jeff Galloway is the master of this. He suggests you take walking breaks early and often and that doing so will not adversely effect your time and will allow you to finish much stronger.

Your hip flexors will get very tired. Work on hills to strengthen your stride. Run on the track to nail down your sense of pacing. Learn to eat and drink while you are running.

My wife is not an ultra marathoner but she was a college athlete with a 2:12 half mile. Not much of an outlet for her speed any more so we go long...much to Coach's chagrin.

Weekly long runs Vanessa, they are the key.
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Old 05-09-2006, 12:04 PM   #6
Peter Queen
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Vanessa, Eugene makes some very good suggestions. The prep work as well as proper foot wear is essential. I would like to add (as a marathon runner myself) is to incorporate speed training into your routine. This helped my 6.5 ft 200+ lb frame a lot. Also you might want to think about getting a camelback. They helped me a lot and I still use mine when running short distances (5 miles or so) on hot days. Here is a link for some designed for women. http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/search2.asp?s_id=0&search_submitted=yes&move=no ne&q_list=&q_count=0&search_freetext=Camelbak%20Wo mens
I would suggest the 50 oz because they are lower profile and are designed for running and not hiking. Make sure you train with it to get use to the feel of wearing it. Wear Cross training is good also as Jim had pointed out. I would suggest swimming and biking. You utilize different muscles but it still helps to build up your lung capacity as well as your mental tolerance for long physical activities. Also you might want to try some GU packs. These provide a high energy source while running. I use to go through about 4 to six packs a marathon. I would take one every 4 to 5 miles. You should take some during your training also if for nothing else to get use to the toothpasty texture. But then you can wash it down with your camelbak.:happy: Here is the link to one of my favorite brands. If you use it or some other brand make sure you get Vanilla. The other flavors normally taste like $#%&. http://www.powerbar.com/Products/PowerGel/

About your training, keep in mind that you will only need to hit 20 miles once. Twice if you feel the need but make sure you do your 20 miler two weeks prior to the run to give your body proper recovery time…..don’t over train. And make sure you wear your running shoes at least a 2 to 3 weeks before the marathon so that you can properly break them in. I have been running ever since my high school cross country days but I did not start running marathons until I was in my 30s. I start training with a lot of ultra marathoners/triatheletes and I got a lot of good tips from them, both men and women. It’s was also kind of fun seeing my daughters holding up signs as I would lumber by the various water stations. Speaking of water stations, pack your camelback with water but drink the Poweraide or Gatoraid at the stations to help keep your energy up. Your biggest challenge will be your own mental barriers and not the conditions. The conditions are only physical substances that can be overcome by proper training but the mental barriers are all psychological. You might want to consider getting some additional data on training from runner’s world. This is a good guide line but not an absolute. These are all just my 2c worth of lessoned learned that worked for me. http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,5033,s6-51-56-0-633,00.html

One final note: I would fill my camelbak half way with water the night before and put it in the freezer. The next morning of the marathon I would take it out and break up the ice and fill the rest with regular water. The pack is designed to keep the ice frozen for at least 2 hours. Aslo eat either oatmeal or 3 bananas for breakfast. Or put a few bananas in your oatmeal. But do no fill your stomach!

Good luck.

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