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Exercises Movements, technique & proper execution

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Old 03-14-2006, 12:29 PM   #11
Baron Dorff
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Hi Elliot - good advice so far. I'm 44 as well, and I've been at it about 7 months now, and started being pretty far gone in terms of conditioning. (Had a two struggling pullup max)

I don't closely monitor my heart rate; but I do know I nearly always exceed the 'recommended' rate. I judge when to stop on how I feel. I push as hard as feels smart, then rest briefly and keep going. I only remember overdoing it once... that's about all it took to get my attention. If you're like me, your body will adapt after about a month of partial WODs. If you're already in decent shape, and it sounds like you are, then you may adapt more quickly.

Caution is the key, but don't get stuck in the dogma box regarding heart rate.
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Old 03-16-2006, 05:30 AM   #12
Daniel Doiron
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Hi guys,

I feel this is a VERY important subject, so I will put in my two cents and change.

I currently work as a Kinesiologist (CSCS, etc)and my wife is a cardiac rehab Kinesiologist (ACSM, etc). I have a few comments about this subject.

We run athletic, personal and weight loss programs here and we do have stress test / V02max available. You would be supprised to know how many people actually get a supprise when we talk to them about the abnormalities in their ECG trace! Not many inactive people know they have a problem. Now if you are currently active, this is a different story, BUT you don't always FEEL the changes that happen at the level of the heart. Keeping track of your heart rate (occasional check or with a monitor) can help you factor out abnormal cardiac rythmes or other problems. Any abnormalities should be brought to a cardiologist's attention for discussion. This could save your life. I have seen this happen in youths also!!

Here are the guidelines we follow for a stress test for inactive people. An active individual, specially with a good history of activity, does not necessarily fit in these guidelines, but you can judge for yourself. I would recommend using more precaution rather than less:

Low risk: No need for a stress test: Below 45 for males, 55 for females with one or less risk factor (smoking, obesity, etc);

Moderate risk: Stress test recommended: 45+ males, 55+ females OR two or more risk factors;

High risk: Stress test recommended / needed: Know cardiovascular problem OR 1 sign or symptom or a CV problem.

As for heart rate % for workouts and stuff...don't even bother with calculating it first of all and second of all the 220-age formula is only applicable to about 50% population with a of 10 or more!

Work as had as you can and keep track of your heart rate to compare to that same workout next time you do it! It's another stat, like your time, the weight use, the distance traveled!!

Hope the rambling helps a couple of people out there!

Have fun and work hard,
Dan
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Old 03-16-2006, 05:54 AM   #13
Larry Lindenman
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Ya or you could do a WOD and if you drop dead, you have a heart problem! Sorry, good post Dan, your right, even if you had a super accurate HR monitor, your heart rate doesn't always correlate with your VO2. IF you wanted to train at a %age, you would want to train at a %age of your VO2 Max. These formulas for heart rate assume heart rate is linear with VO2...so the heart rate is just an indication of where your VO2 is, so using a HR monitor is just guessing...worthless for training athletes, possibly helpful for cardiac rehab patients.
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Old 03-16-2006, 06:38 AM   #14
Daniel Doiron
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I don't use the V02max to conclude much. It will tell me the max, but not where a person can work. For that I use things with the anaerobic threshold or the Wingate on a bike. BUT again, all this information is to be compared to the next testing session you do. Heart rates, V02, etc are not applicable except in the same situation as tested.
I appologize if I sound like I am not a big fan of lab testing for exercise Rx, but I am not! I don't think it works. Lab testing simply gives me a profile (metabolic or other) of an individual. I certainly does not describe their performance in sports or in life.
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Old 03-16-2006, 06:46 AM   #15
Don Woodson
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I'm new at actually trying to measure my heart rate during excercise, but since we have these treadmills at work, I've been trying to figure out my max heart rate. But the machine won't let me check it. Yesterday I ran at 10.5mph for two minutes and got my heart going pretty good. Problem is, the treadmill has the sensors in two hand grips which are kinda hard to hold on to and run 10.5 mph at the same time, so I have to slow down a little and grab the grips. But it takes another full two minutes for it to register my HR. By the time I get a reading, I can tell my HR has dropped down and it measures only 160bpm, so I still have no idea what my max is. I guess I need to buy an analog watch with a second hand and check it the old fashioned way. Or a HRM with the chest sensor.
Then one time, I made the mistake of telling the machine how old I am (47). The machine kept telling me to slow down, I'm killing myself.
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Old 03-16-2006, 10:59 AM   #16
Josh Briggs
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Buy yourself a chest monitor.

Timex, Polar, or Suunto all make good ones. ~75$ for a basic model.

Find a hill, run uphill easy for 5 mins, moderate for 5mins, fast for 3mins, then go as hard as you can, check the watch for the highest stable BPM reading.

Don't use the "Max Heartrate" function. Most people have a slight cardiac arrhythmia... usually accentuated at effort, so it will usually give you an erroneous reading.

Test a few times, and average the results.

You will only be able to get the treadmill method to work if you can increase the incline, and then have a partner adjust the controls to make it steeper and faster. But you'll still need the chest monitor.
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Old 03-17-2006, 11:16 AM   #17
Don Woodson
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Thanks Josh.
That's another thing I don't like about these treadmills. They have those fake buttons that you have to punch in a numerical value, then enter it. It would be so much easier if they had something like an airplane or boat throttle.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:12 PM   #18
Dare Vodusek
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Re: Heart Rate During Exercise

Im gonna re-open this very old thread, but it contains a lot of information I am interested in.

I've read many of you train/do WODs close to your max heart rate and stay there very long, some even for 2 hours.

I've heard doing so (keeping HR very high, close to max, like 95%+) can lead to heart failure (I am not sure if this is the same term as I am looking for?) over time. Basicly it means heart will start loosing its ability to pump, which can then lead to heart attack.

I've been at cardiologist a few weeks ago (to see if my pectus excavatum affects its performance) and everything turned out OK. But Dr advised me to keep my HR at 150-160 if I am working out long and to do 180+ only for shorter period of time. Sadly I forgot to ask why.

Are there any real studies that show if a person is really fit, he/she can keep HR very high for longer periods of time without hurting the heart or are you all assuming its fine because you "can" do it, but we really dont know how this affects heart on the long run?
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:27 PM   #19
Donald Lee
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Re: Heart Rate During Exercise

It's impossible to maintain that high of a HR.

Read this article (WFS):

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/enduranc.htm

and others like it.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:52 PM   #20
Dare Vodusek
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Re: Heart Rate During Exercise

Somebody lying then?

Quote from post nr 2:

Quote:
I am 29, so with a theoretical max of 191. But I can hold an average of 188/189 for over two hours, and can hold >190 for 45mins or so. Have tested consistently to 204 with the very unscienticif method of running uphill with the monitor.
Anyhow...how should one program his training together with HR? Is it better to just try and do as much as you can, no matter how high HR is, or its better to keep HR at a certain zone for max gains?
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