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Old 01-10-2011, 12:14 PM   #1
Thomas Green
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The Olympic Press

Anyone ever use this in their training? Recently, a certain website posted a couple of cool instructional videos on this lift. Just curious to see if people think it's helped their training, if it's too hard on the low back, if their press numbers go up significantly w/ it, etc.. Thanks!
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Old 01-10-2011, 02:04 PM   #2
Jason Peacock
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Re: The Olympic Press

Had to google that to see what's different than a normal press. Apparently it's the double-layback of the upper body to keep the bar moving smoothing - to me it looks like you're using your back to make it a jerk.

It seems like a high-skill movement, and I'm not sure what I'd gain from it other than an increased risk of injury from doing it wrong

If you're in a comp to "lift weight from chest to overhead with locked out knees" then it'd be good to know to optimize your power.
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Old 01-10-2011, 02:32 PM   #3
Thomas Green
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Re: The Olympic Press

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Peacock View Post
Had to google that to see what's different than a normal press. Apparently it's the double-layback of the upper body to keep the bar moving smoothing - to me it looks like you're using your back to make it a jerk.

It seems like a high-skill movement, and I'm not sure what I'd gain from it other than an increased risk of injury from doing it wrong

If you're in a comp to "lift weight from chest to overhead with locked out knees" then it'd be good to know to optimize your power.
I hear you on that. Basically the only advantage I can see so far is that it allows you to put up more weight. And like you said, with an increased risk of injury. That was one of the reasons they got rid of the lift in the olympics.
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Old 01-10-2011, 02:36 PM   #4
Frederic Giraud
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Re: The Olympic Press

They got rid of it because it was too hard to judge.

There is nothing wrong with the risk injury associated with this movement ( as with any other lift ) if one took the time to progressively adapt to the movement.

One can lift more weight than a traditional press because the olympic press recruits much more chest muscle that help to get the weight up.
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Old 01-10-2011, 03:02 PM   #5
Thomas Green
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Re: The Olympic Press

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Originally Posted by Frederic Giraud View Post
They got rid of it because it was too hard to judge.

There is nothing wrong with the risk injury associated with this movement ( as with any other lift ) if one took the time to progressively adapt to the movement.

One can lift more weight than a traditional press because the olympic press recruits much more chest muscle that help to get the weight up.
In the coaching video with Tommy Suggs, he says the large number of back injuries was also part of the reason they got rid of it.
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Old 01-10-2011, 03:29 PM   #6
Shane Skowron
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Re: The Olympic Press

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Peacock View Post
Had to google that to see what's different than a normal press. Apparently it's the double-layback of the upper body to keep the bar moving smoothing - to me it looks like you're using your back to make it a jerk.
There's a sort of dip before driving with the arms, but the knees must remain locked.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Peacock View Post
It seems like a high-skill movement, and I'm not sure what I'd gain from it other than an increased risk of injury from doing it wrong
High-skill, really? The reason it was attractive to introductory weightlifters because it required minimal technique. You just press, and whoever is strongest wins. With the snatch, on the other hand, it requires a good deal of technique.

And also the Olympic press requires significant ab strength in comparison to the regular press. (Try bending backward with 300# on your chest)
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:27 PM   #7
Thomas Green
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Re: The Olympic Press

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Originally Posted by Shane Skowron View Post
There's a sort of dip before driving with the arms, but the knees must remain locked.




High-skill, really? The reason it was attractive to introductory weightlifters because it required minimal technique. You just press, and whoever is strongest wins. With the snatch, on the other hand, it requires a good deal of technique.

And also the Olympic press requires significant ab strength in comparison to the regular press. (Try bending backward with 300# on your chest)
The explanation of the technique in the video seemed pretty complex. But maybe that's just cuz I'm used to the regular press.

I think every disc in my back would rupture if I did a standing incline bench press with that weight lol.
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Old 01-10-2011, 06:29 PM   #8
Lincoln Brigham
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Re: The Olympic Press

Quote:
High-skill, really? The reason it was attractive to introductory weightlifters because it required minimal technique. You just press, and whoever is strongest wins.
The Olympic press eventually evolved into a high-skill lift, one that involved significant back bend that put a great deal of stress on the vertebrae. The lifter didn't just press. The trick was to drive the bar off the shoulders while rapidly dropping into a deep back bend. Done in this style the lift became known sarcastically as the standing bench press.

See video examples here:
http://www.gryphon-sc.com/sedona_wod...echniques.html
Click on the play button.

Vasily Alexeev's best all-time press of 230.5 kilos used knee kick, back bend, and very little pressing. To see it, click on the link above, change the lifter to Alexeev and click on the View button.

Link is work/family safe
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Old 01-10-2011, 07:34 PM   #9
Tamara Cohen
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Re: The Olympic Press

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
See video examples here:
http://www.gryphon-sc.com/sedona_wod...echniques.html
Click on the play button.

Vasily Alexeev's best all-time press of 230.5 kilos used knee kick, back bend, and very little pressing. To see it, click on the link above, change the lifter to Alexeev and click on the View button.

Link is work/family safe
Very cool, Lincoln. Dying looking at Alexeev in that itty bitty singlet.
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Old 01-10-2011, 08:24 PM   #10
Shane Skowron
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Re: The Olympic Press

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincoln Brigham View Post
The Olympic press eventually evolved into a high-skill lift, one that involved significant back bend that put a great deal of stress on the vertebrae. The lifter didn't just press. The trick was to drive the bar off the shoulders while rapidly dropping into a deep back bend. Done in this style the lift became known sarcastically as the standing bench press.

See video examples here:
http://www.gryphon-sc.com/sedona_wod...echniques.html
Click on the play button.

Vasily Alexeev's best all-time press of 230.5 kilos used knee kick, back bend, and very little pressing. To see it, click on the link above, change the lifter to Alexeev and click on the View button.

Link is work/family safe
My coach held one of the world records in the press. He told me the press was great for the sport of olympic weightlifting because guys could jump in right away more or less and just press. Not true for the other lifts. I realize there's a technique to the press but it pales in comparison to the clean and jerk and snatch, I think.
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