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-   -   box jump injuries (http://board.crossfit.com/showthread.php?t=73625)

Erik Knudsen 02-21-2012 11:32 AM

box jump injuries
 
This exercise, to me, is one of those that can result in some injuries (well all exercises can do this I suppose).

But I am wondering if a lot of potential misery can be avoided if folks step down from the boxes versus jumping off? I was watching people at our gym perform box jumps and some look to be landing very awkwardly on the floor. These were not soft landings and box jumps seem to be a "regular" at our facility.

As you get tired I think it's very easy to lose focus and it's even harder to land "softly."

Erik

Sean Dunston 02-21-2012 11:34 AM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Yes, stepping down will greatly reduce the risk of injuries from box jumps.
Stepping down from the box will also greatly increase your cycle time.
If you would rather do a WOD fast, than be safe, these are the decisions you must make.
;)

Erik Knudsen 02-21-2012 11:39 AM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Hi Sean. I agree 100% I am coming from the perspective that I'd rather do something like crossfit for years on end vs battle chronic leg and knee pain. Having said that, I would point out that the landing portion of the box jump can be overlooked (emphasis placed on box height and open hip at the top).

Yes, for speed, we know the elite guys hop up and down like mad at a furious pace.

Perhaps for sets of 10-15, this is less of an issue...but I wonder if you piling on the reps (50+), then step down approach is better for your health.

Rebecca Roth 02-21-2012 12:30 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
I always did step down, unfortunately that didn't help me any when I hit the box with my toe on the way up, pushing it back, and causing me to come down with the corner of the box under my kneecap... obviously not a fan of box jumps anymore.

Tony Sutton 02-21-2012 12:41 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Erik Knudsen (Post 1036056)
This exercise, to me, is one of those that can result in some injuries (well all exercises can do this I suppose).

But I am wondering if a lot of potential misery can be avoided if folks step down from the boxes versus jumping off? I was watching people at our gym perform box jumps and some look to be landing very awkwardly on the floor. These were not soft landings and box jumps seem to be a "regular" at our facility.

As you get tired I think it's very easy to lose focus and it's even harder to land "softly."

Erik

I think you have it correct in your second paragraph. It's not so much the box jump, it is how the box (gym) allows it to be performed. If they have chronic problems with people being hurt on the box, something should be re-evaluated.

With that said, what are the standards for your box jumps? Our gym holds strict games standards, and it seems to slow people down enough to perform quality reps. We also stress quality reps over speed regardless.

Erik Knudsen 02-21-2012 02:12 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
We focus on getting people to open the hips all the way, or essentially stand up, at the top of the box. I learned the jumps 2 years ago and I can't recall if we paid a lot of attention on how to land softly.

Our boxes are also tapered. I do not know if these sorts of boxes promote a different sort of jump, or landing. I believe the "official" boxes are straight (vertical sides, no taper).

We try to focus on form as best we can. For this particular exercise, and this is one we do often, I think the form should be checked regularly and some attention should be paid to the landing.

Jason Peacock 02-21-2012 02:37 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Sounds like some people need to be taught how to land correctly. Which isn't bad, it's just commonly overlooked when teaching box jumps.

And landing correctly is important in many other places too, like dismounting the rings/pullup bars.

Kevin Carey 02-21-2012 02:55 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
You can still jump down and protect your achillies, just settle on the ground and let your heel touch down to cancel out the stretch reflex in your calf. It's all the tension from the stretch reflex in your achillies/calf that causes problems, not the actually landing.

If you really want to boost your box jump, try jumping from a seated position- like jumping out of the bottom of a box squat. It's notably harder when you can't pre-load your posterior chain to spring upward.

Mauricio Leal 02-21-2012 03:15 PM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Jumping and rebounding is something very innate in humans despite its complexity (triple extension, arm swing, stretch-reflex/bouncing in general). It takes a fair amount of skill to rebound off the ground safely and effectively, but it is totally doable if you let your ego go and use a smaller box. I have athletes that are capable of jumping on a 24" box for reps, but to develop their rebounding skills use the 12" then 16" then 20" box for a while first. Box jumps are kindof like wall balls: sure you can muscle your way through a few but it's really a test of accuracy and precision (of landing position and jump mechanics) to be able to rep them out, and you can only learn that by practicing within your abilities.

Knees bowing inwards on takeoff and landing is a common fault that can be cued against. Jarring and/or awkward landings are a sign to scale. When in doubt jump up and step down.

Tony Sutton 02-22-2012 06:34 AM

Re: box jump injuries
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kevin Carey (Post 1036130)
You can still jump down and protect your achillies, just settle on the ground and let your heel touch down to cancel out the stretch reflex in your calf. It's all the tension from the stretch reflex in your achillies/calf that causes problems, not the actually landing.

If you really want to boost your box jump, try jumping from a seated position- like jumping out of the bottom of a box squat. It's notably harder when you can't pre-load your posterior chain to spring upward.

Interesting!


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