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Dusty Bratton
12-31-2011, 01:12 PM
Materials

Just build a new pull up/ring bar and thought I’d share with the board. It was a pretty simple project and only took a single afternoon to put up. As far as materials and cost go:

• 2 – 16’ 4”x4” Wood Post - $15/post
• 1 – 12’ 4”x4” Wood Post - $12
• 4 – 1 ¼” Galvanized Steel Flange - $7.00/flange
• 1 – 48” 1 ¼” Threaded Galvanized Pipe - $20
• 1 – 70” 1 ¼” Threaded Galvanized Pipe - $35
• 16 - #14 3” Wood Screws – $0.30/screw

This comes to a total of around $130. All materials bought at a local hardware store so some of the prices may be slightly higher as compared to a Home Depot or Lowes. Now onto construction:

Step 1

I laid the pipe on the ground to give me an estimate of how far apart to place the holes in the ground for the post. After my spots were marked I got out my trusty post hole digger and dug 3 – 42” holes.

Step 2

Next I placed each post in its hole and marked with a marker where I wanted the flanges mounted for the bars. For the pull up bar I went with 7’6” and for the ring bar I set it at 12’. After the markings were made I took each post back out of the hole.

Step 3

Now it was time for some power tools. I overlaid my flanges on the markings I made in step 2, pre-drilled my holes, and then attached the flanges to the 4”x4”s using the #14 wood screws.

Step 4

The last step was simply lifting the apparatus up and placing it in the holes. I used a level to ensure each post was level as I added the dirt back to the hole. The whole thing seemed pretty sturdy but if it seems to not hold well enough I may dig it back out and add concrete around the post. I was hoping with putting the beams so deep in the ground I wouldn’t have to use any concrete.

Closing Thoughts

So far it seems it will be sturdy enough without the concrete but only time will tell. Also I went with a much thicker pipe than my last pull up bar as I’ve been having issues with rips during high rep pull up workouts. The 12’ height bar for the rings seems just right. Its high enough for muscle ups and still low enough that I can lower it down for dips. For any workout with ring HSPU I plan on just using the pull up bar. If anyone has any questions on the set up I’ll do my best to explain it. I’ve also added a few pictures to help visualize everything.

Dusty Bratton
12-31-2011, 01:13 PM
More Pictures.

Jason Wallis
12-31-2011, 01:59 PM
Very nice!

Rob Cortez
02-01-2012, 12:47 AM
Thats a nice setup for that price!

Patrick Foy
02-02-2012, 10:43 AM
I really like your design and may do something just like this. A few questions; Do the bars move at all or are they set to where they stay still? Were you able to fit the long posts in a truck or did you have them delivered? Probably will end up using your design.

Dusty Bratton
02-03-2012, 07:55 PM
I really like your design and may do something just like this. A few questions; Do the bars move at all or are they set to where they stay still? Were you able to fit the long posts in a truck or did you have them delivered? Probably will end up using your design.

The bars don't move at all and the wood post actually fit in the back of my tahoe. I just had to leave the back glass open so they could hang out the back.

Anson Castelvecchi
02-05-2012, 04:04 PM
Nice work. But for safety I'd put the bar through the timbers, I'd worry about how the floor flanges would hold up under stress long term.

Matty Rogers
02-05-2012, 07:43 PM
Nice work. But for safety I'd put the bar through the timbers, I'd worry about how the floor flanges would hold up under stress long term.


Agree. I would definitely put the bars through the timber posts.

Josh Elias
02-11-2012, 10:20 AM
Dusty,
This is very similar to what I want to do myself. Instead of continuing to the side, I want to come off the 12' height at a 90, put the (approx) 8' height bar. Then off that, go 90 again and put some chest height parallel bars. Essentially making a "Z" shape, just with right angles.

Is the 12' height still working for your muscle ups? What about the movement? Any noticeable? And last, how's the 70" width working out? Any questionable bar flex?

Dusty Bratton
02-11-2012, 11:40 PM
Dusty,
This is very similar to what I want to do myself. Instead of continuing to the side, I want to come off the 12' height at a 90, put the (approx) 8' height bar. Then off that, go 90 again and put some chest height parallel bars. Essentially making a "Z" shape, just with right angles.

Is the 12' height still working for your muscle ups? What about the movement? Any noticeable? And last, how's the 70" width working out? Any questionable bar flex?

I actually considered doing something very similar to what you're wanting to do but then decided not to add a parallel bar set. Although I would not be surprised if I decided to add to it later.

As for the 12' height, its plenty high for me at 5'11" and I probably could have gotten away with making it a little bit lower but since I was getting the 16' 4x4s I had plenty of room to work with. Also once I added some concrete the whole apparatus is incredibly stable and has no noticeable sway. I think this is a combination of being anchored so deep and also with the added concrete helping out. The 70" width gives plenty of room for any iron cross work or any other ring exercises where you'll need the extra space. 1 1/4" galvanized pipe is fairly thick so I haven't noticed any bar flex at all. The downside of the thicker bar is that it does make my grip give out quicker on high rep pull ups but that’s also balanced out by the fact that I haven't had any callus rips since I've started using it as opposed to my old pull up bar that had was 3/4" diameter and used to tear up my hands on a regular basis.

Any other questions you have just let me know and when you finish your set up post some pictures as I would be very interested in how it turns out with the z configuration and the parallel bars.

Jon Fuller
08-28-2015, 06:13 PM
I already had the idea to build one just like this, but this post helped me get the right materials (e.g., flanges and screws). Here's mine!