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Jason Hogue
02-18-2009, 11:03 AM
I got my level 1 cert in January and have since been doing free training for the ROTC program at a nearby college and for a friend to hone my training skills. Another friend went to a cert last weekend and said he was told at the cert that you can train individuals using the CrossFit name on a small level without affiliating.

I wanted to get some clarification before I go somewhere I should not go ethically. I work most of the day in sales, but have the flexibility to do some training in the morning if I can gather some clients.

So, to the real question. Can I train and call it Crossfit without Affiliating? Where is the line that I am required to affiliate while working out of my garage? I couldn't find this specifically addressed in a search so I wanted to get clarification. It is tough getting started, and doing some training on a small level would give me some insight as to if I would really be able to start a gym and run an affiliate. Thanks in advance. I love CrossFit and I love training, it would be cool to get paid a little for my time and effort. I just want to do it the right way.

Michael Houghton
02-18-2009, 11:25 AM
You can call yourself CrossFit certified, but you can't call it CrossFit if you are training people. They are very strict on this. You can train people all you want, though, just can't call it CrossFit.

Ned Ferguson
02-18-2009, 11:25 AM
I believe I heard Nicole say that you can state that you "use the Crossfit methodology" in your training and be OK but that you cannot expressly call it "Crossfit". A somewhat fine distinction. Maybe some others can chime in.

Katherine Derbyshire
02-18-2009, 11:41 AM
FAQ:
9.17. If I do not want to affiliate but I am a certified CrossFit trainer, how can I use the name legally?
You can call yourself a CrossFit-certified trainer and say you use CrossFit methods.
You can state that you are CrossFit certified on your website and business cards.
You cannot use the CrossFit name, slogans, art work or photos in any business or promotional way unless you affiliate. This includes business cards and web sites. Affiliation gives you the legal right to use the CrossFit name for business and/or promotional purposes.

So it sounds like business cards that say "Jason Hogue, CrossFit certified trainer" would be fine. Cards that say "Jason Hogue, Benton CrossFit" would not.

Katherine

Stephen Wakefoose
02-18-2009, 09:31 PM
Just curious Katherine who was answering the post you included?

I jsut got my level 1 cert last weekend and was basicaly told the same thing but just wondering.

Katherine Derbyshire
02-18-2009, 09:57 PM
Just curious Katherine who was answering the post you included?

I jsut got my level 1 cert last weekend and was basicaly told the same thing but just wondering.

I was quoting from the site FAQ. http://www.crossfit.com/cf-info/faq.html#Affiliates16 (WFS)

Katherine

Dan MacDougald
02-19-2009, 05:40 AM
The guidelines in the FAQ are admittedly a little fuzzy, but it may help to understand where we want to draw the line, which is this: you cannot market or advertise using the CrossFit brand without affiliating. Put another way, don't promote yourself, don't grab a domain, don't advertise or market using term "CrossFit" without a licensing agreement from CrossFit, Inc.

When in doubt, ask. This is definitely an area where it is better to ask permission than to seek forgiveness.

Jason Hogue
02-19-2009, 10:31 AM
Thanks for the help, I know how I can market my self properly and legally now. I am going to try to find a few clients and get things moving, and when I have everything together, I will affiliate and use CrossFit legally:thanx:

Eric R Cohen
02-26-2009, 03:54 PM
"If I do not want to affiliate but I am a certified CrossFit trainer, how can I use the name legally?
You can call yourself a CrossFit-certified trainer and say you use CrossFit methods.
You can state that you are CrossFit certified on your website and business cards.
You cannot use the CrossFit name, slogans, art work or photos in any business or promotional way unless you affiliate. This includes business cards and web sites. Affiliation gives you the legal right to use the CrossFit name for business and/or promotional purposes."


Not to beat a dead horse, but it's still not clear to me. The second and third sentences are contradictory.
The way I understand the above, after attending CF level 1, I can put the words "CrossFit Certified" on my business card. But I cannot call myself or my website "CrossFitMyTown"(or whatever).
Is that the correct interpretation?
Thanks!

Bob Guere
02-26-2009, 04:15 PM
"If I do not want to affiliate but I am a certified CrossFit trainer, how can I use the name legally?
You can call yourself a CrossFit-certified trainer and say you use CrossFit methods.
You can state that you are CrossFit certified on your website and business cards.
You cannot use the CrossFit name, slogans, art work or photos in any business or promotional way unless you affiliate. This includes business cards and web sites. Affiliation gives you the legal right to use the CrossFit name for business and/or promotional purposes."


Not to beat a dead horse, but it's still not clear to me. The second and third sentences are contradictory.
The way I understand the above, after attending CF level 1, I can put the words "CrossFit Certified" on my business card. But I cannot call myself or my website "CrossFitMyTown"(or whatever).
Is that the correct interpretation?
Thanks!

That is how I interpret, and how it was explained to me from CFHQ, which gels with the FAQ.

Stephen Flamm
02-26-2009, 07:04 PM
deleted

Cody Limbaugh
03-11-2009, 01:57 PM
Any guidelines on using the 'Named' "girl" WODs? If I post FRAN or FIGHT GONE BAD on my website as an L1 CF Trainer who is not yet an affiliate am I in violation or is it only 'CrossFit' that is trademarked.

Eric Lester
03-13-2009, 12:46 PM
Good question, Cody. I'd like to know as well. I figured it was just the CF name and logos, etc. But the named workouts might be considered IP too.

Mike Wright
03-29-2009, 07:07 PM
Just finished my cert and was left fuzzy on this point, for which the trainer did not have a good answer. My certificate says "Crossfit's Level 1 Instructor/Trainer Course proving the ability to teach the Crossfit method.

So I can TEACH Crossfit, but I can not CALL it Crossfit-thats fuzzy. So if I work @ a Globo Gym or in the corner of a gymnastics est. can they say they have a "Crossfit trainer"? If not, the only thing a Level 1 can do is get me hired at an Affiliate? I am kind of bummed w/the cost ($1700 - cert, hotel, food, travel) if thats the case, especially if it is just to encourage you to do a Level 2 for another grand. Dont get me wrong, it was a great experience, but much of the material covered could be learned by watching the vids on the Main site and subscribing to the CFJ.

Take that with a grain of salt, as I am a very cheap man in the military with 5 kids who loves CF.:D

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 05:55 AM
Just finished my cert and was left fuzzy on this point, for which the trainer did not have a good answer.

So I can TEACH CrossFit, but I can not CALL it CrossFit-thats fuzzy.



Actually, it's not fuzzy at all.

Here's the bottom line (FAQ be damned - we're fixing that.) You cannot market, advertise, or use the trademarked name "CrossFit" unless you have a license agreement with CF, Inc. to use its name. This is how we protect you from every mope out there who suddenly wants to say they're "doing CrossFit" when they're having people do Db bench presses from a BOSU ball.:ranting2:
We have an obligation as a trademark holder to protect that mark - both in defending it, controlling its use, and ensuring the quality of the service being offered in our name.

HQ has just had a big powwow on this matter: From now on, all new Level I's will sign a limited license agreement allowing them use to market themselves in a limited way (because they're not paying for it) using the name CrossFit. Business cards is about it. All existing Level I's will eventually sign the same agreement.

If one wants to enjoy the full-on benefits of being a professional CF trainer, then they're going to have to enter into a comprehensive license agreement. Right now that looks like affiliation.

There will be other requirements and gouge forthcoming, but that should suffice for now.

I'm awaiting the hue and cry,:eek: but the bottom line is this - Crossfit cannot legally allow people to rampantly use the name without being in some type of legal agreement about the name's use. Not if we want to keep our trademark for very long. As a more practical matter, it only benefits those who want to truly do CrossFit by having the name protected and ensuring the quality of those people claiming to do it. Finally, imagine in any other endeavor, someone using the name "Adidas", "Rawlings", or "Under Armour" to advertise or market themselves without getting permission from, having some type of agreement with, or paying something to, those companies. The same legal requirements for protecting TM applies to us as to them.

CF is a rapidly growing name and we simply cannot afford to give away the use of our trademark. The FAQ only went the way it did beginning last October. That's in the process of being corrected.

Robert D Taylor Jr
03-30-2009, 06:38 AM
Mr. Saran,
Please help me understand this, I am a Level I trainer, and now a Kettlebell Instructor, could I offer to teach a class at my local Navy Base without affiliating? This is NOT happening now, but I am considering making an offer.

Tobias W. Neal
03-30-2009, 07:29 AM
Mr Saran:

Here is my question...if we view the CrossFit cert as a cert much like A.C.E. or NSCA, or ACSM, when we are at a Globo or anywhere else we just add it on the end of our names, hence Tobias Neal, CPT, ACE, NSCA CrossFit, but here is the rub if I am doing classes or teaching my one-on-ones anything resembling CrossFit then I have to be affiliated?

Is it a matter of programming then, are we a cert or something else? For example you can become a Spin instructor, advertise spin classes, etc, but I cannot become Crossfit certified and advertise CrossFit classes?

So is it a business or a cert? I blanketed all of these by affiliating but I have folks that are Level 1 here that are asking the same questions that don't or can't pay $2000 dollars for the affiliation and insurance. I look forward to hearing from you on this.

Repectfully,

T

Lewis Dunn
03-30-2009, 08:05 AM
The guidelines in the FAQ are admittedly a little fuzzy

Actually, it's not fuzzy at all......Here's the bottom line (FAQ be damned - we're fixing that.)

The real question here seems to be, is it fuzzy or not?

Seriously, this will be interesting to watch. CrossFit-like training and workouts are becoming so ubiquitous out there that there will be (and I’m sure already is) more and more use of “CrossFit” as a generic term. I can certainly see that the company has its work cut out for it in protecting its trademark.

Randy Tarasevich
03-30-2009, 08:27 AM
When did you become CF Staff Dale?? Congrats man!

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 09:06 AM
Randy - a while back, man. Tell your better-half I apologize for not getting back to her. CF keeps me up at nights and because of conflicts I had to close my affiliate.

Tobias - You are confusing CrossFit the program with the trademark. You are not alone and many people conflate the two. CrossFit cannot, nor does it have any desire, to stop or limit people from using CF methods in their training. We WANT THAT! The more people doing CF, the better.

The issue you're talking about is to what extent people can use the CrossFit name in marketing themselves as trainers in order to make a profit. Those are two very, very different things.

To clarify, let me add some classifications that may help break this out.

Case 1 - A has never been to a CF cert of any level. A is a personal trainer, ACE, ACSM, PhD, I don't care what alphabet soup. He wants to use the CrossFit methodology to train his clients. Bravo! Good for him. Coach Greg Glassman did not invent the push-up, nor did Coach Mike Burgener invent the Clean and Jerk - they'll both be the first to tell you that. Coach Glassman didn't invent the stopwatch, either. So, we have no legal claim - nor any desire - to stop someone from using our techniques/methods or something that looks like them to train their athletes. Or even improving on it (if they can). What they CANNOT do, however, is advertise, market, or try to promote their business by using our trademark. Period. That's a no-no and will receive my immediate attention. That's another name for stealing (our goodwill) to gain customers for themselves.

Case 2 - B is a Level I trainer. Been to the seminar, received the certificate, even got to kiss Nicole and Man-hug Dave (lucky guy). B can (under the guidelines we're setting forth and drafting now) like A above, train people however the hell he wants. We would hope he would use CF as his preferred way of training folks. But if he wants to market himself as a CF trainer in order to bring business in the door, then the answer is as I stated in the post above - he has limited options because he's getting a "freebie" - a no-fee license (essentially) as a result of the cert - to use our name in a limited fashion. This is for many, many legal reasons that I don't have time to lecture on in this already long-winded post. Business cards and resume. That's it. He can tell people (verbally) he's a CF trainer.

Case 3 - C has her Level I and wants to open a box and go "all in" with us. She meets all of the requirements for affiliation (there are new guidelines coming), applies, gets accepted, and enters into a comprehensive license agreement with us and can use the CF name in a much, much more robust way because she's family now. She gets to pick an affiliate name that includes CF in the title, gets listed on the site, gets some love on the A-blog, can use CF plus her Affil name in some promotional materials (t-shirts, beanies, etc.). And on.

That pretty much covers it. There are other cats and dogs out there, but they're beyond the scope. Mil affils are non-profit, but they also operate under a license agreement with us. Clubs are similar.

Now all of you back to work.

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 09:16 AM
Mr Saran:

...if we view the CrossFit cert as a cert much like A.C.E. or NSCA, or ACSM, when we are at a Globo or anywhere else we just add it on the end of our names, hence Tobias Neal, CPT, ACE, NSCA CrossFit, but here is the rub if I am doing classes or teaching my one-on-ones anything resembling CrossFit then I have to be affiliated?

Is it a matter of programming then, are we a cert or something else?


Tobias - one other thing - don't view CrossFit "much like A.C.E. or NSCA, or ACSM". That's the mistake your making right up front. We're not, nor do we want to be, anything like them or what they offer. We are changing the paradigm completely and that's something many people are having trouble dealing with. They're arguing from an analogue that doesn't apply to us or how we train. They have almost no science to back up what they do and yet they have tried to position themselves as 'experts' in the science of exercise. We're going to actually "do" some science.

We're chasing excellence in human performance in quantifiable, measurable, repeatable ways. We've opened up everything we do to the light of day. We hide nothing. It's free. We give it away. Our methodology is open to criticism and repetition for anyone to try.

We just think that if someone wants to try to use our name to get clients, they should (a) be doing our program, (b) be in a license agreement with us to do so. Otherwise, when they hurt someone or do something dumb and turn someone off to "their CF", we have no recourse or, worse yet, are unknowingly exposed to liability.

Lewis Dunn
03-30-2009, 09:41 AM
Case 1 - A has never been to a CF cert of any level. A is a personal trainer, ACE, ACSM, PhD, I don't care what alphabet soup. He wants to use the CrossFit methodology to train his clients. Bravo! Good for him.
I can understand that he is free to use workouts that look just like CF workouts, but can he call it "CrossFit methodology"? If so, verbally only? Written? In other words, can he use the word "CrossFit" at all?

Tobias W. Neal
03-30-2009, 10:35 AM
Randy - a while back, man. Tell your better-half I apologize for not getting back to her. CF keeps me up at nights and because of conflicts I had to close my affiliate.

Tobias - You are confusing CrossFit the program with the trademark. You are not alone and many people conflate the two. CrossFit cannot, nor does it have any desire, to stop or limit people from using CF methods in their training. We WANT THAT! The more people doing CF, the better.

The issue you're talking about is to what extent people can use the CrossFit name in marketing themselves as trainers in order to make a profit. Those are two very, very different things.

To clarify, let me add some classifications that may help break this out.

Case 1 - A has never been to a CF cert of any level. A is a personal trainer, ACE, ACSM, PhD, I don't care what alphabet soup. He wants to use the CrossFit methodology to train his clients. Bravo! Good for him. Coach Greg Glassman did not invent the push-up, nor did Coach Mike Burgener invent the Clean and Jerk - they'll both be the first to tell you that. Coach Glassman didn't invent the stopwatch, either. So, we have no legal claim - nor any desire - to stop someone from using our techniques/methods or something that looks like them to train their athletes. Or even improving on it (if they can). What they CANNOT do, however, is advertise, market, or try to promote their business by using our trademark. Period. That's a no-no and will receive my immediate attention. That's another name for stealing (our goodwill) to gain customers for themselves.

Case 2 - B is a Level I trainer. Been to the seminar, received the certificate, even got to kiss Nicole and Man-hug Dave (lucky guy). B can (under the guidelines we're setting forth and drafting now) like A above, train people however the hell he wants. We would hope he would use CF as his preferred way of training folks. But if he wants to market himself as a CF trainer in order to bring business in the door, then the answer is as I stated in the post above - he has limited options because he's getting a "freebie" - a no-fee license (essentially) as a result of the cert - to use our name in a limited fashion. This is for many, many legal reasons that I don't have time to lecture on in this already long-winded post. Business cards and resume. That's it. He can tell people (verbally) he's a CF trainer.

Case 3 - C has her Level I and wants to open a box and go "all in" with us. She meets all of the requirements for affiliation (there are new guidelines coming), applies, gets accepted, and enters into a comprehensive license agreement with us and can use the CF name in a much, much more robust way because she's family now. She gets to pick an affiliate name that includes CF in the title, gets listed on the site, gets some love on the A-blog, can use CF plus her Affil name in some promotional materials (t-shirts, beanies, etc.). And on.

That pretty much covers it. There are other cats and dogs out there, but they're beyond the scope. Mil affils are non-profit, but they also operate under a license agreement with us. Clubs are similar.

Now all of you back to work.

I appreciate the long winded post :) as this helps to clarify the questions I asked. Thanks! Especially B and C

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 11:53 AM
Lewis - please re-read the posts I wrote above. I think they spell this out pretty clearly. Read the last part of case B.
If someone is not CF certified, I would question by what claim they say they're using CrossFit methodology if they (a) don't do the WoDs, (b) haven't done the WoDs, (c) haven't been to a cert or an affiliate to really learn what CF is. But as a trademark (and practical) matter, they can say what they want. It's when they start advertising and marketing that they're going to run afoul of TM law.
They can call what they're doing tomato soup for all I care.

Mike Wright
03-30-2009, 02:28 PM
So Dale,
Would it be fair to say that a Level 1 isnt of much use to a person not planning on Affiliating?...aside from the knowledge, the experience and the kiss from Nicole.:confused:

Justin Rovtar
03-30-2009, 02:55 PM
Mike,

Level 1 Cert is worth it if you are interested in learning proper technique on the 9 fundamental exercises, CrossFit Programming, Etc.

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 04:28 PM
So Dale,
Would it be fair to say that a Level 1 isnt of much use to a person not planning on Affiliating?...aside from the knowledge, the experience and the kiss from Nicole.:confused:

No, Mike, in my opinion, that is not fair to say.

When dinosaurs roamed the Earth freely (and before they turned into home heating oil), it used to be that people went to the certs to learn how to do CrossFit. I had no interest in being a trainer or affiliate when I went. I was absolutely blown away by the knowledge. Truly, I was awed. That alone was worth the time, effort, $$, etc., to go.

If someone thinks they can get everything they need from the site and journal, that's a personal decision. But to say that a cert "isn't of much use to a person not planning on Affiliating" is a sweepingly broad statement. It presumes to be able to value a Level I for every person out there who might want to go and to peg their value only to Affiliation or future pecuniary gain.

Respectfully disagree.

Mike Wright
03-30-2009, 05:14 PM
"It presumes to be able to value a Level I for every person out there who might want to go and to peg their value only to Affiliation or future pecuniary gain."

Not every person...but some.

"I had no interest in being a trainer or affiliate when I went."

That's awesome, but dont scoff at someone who is considering ways to make a living doing what he loves. I dont know of any Affiliates (aside from the MIL non-profits) who are pro-bono and out to fail.

Either way, thanks for the input and information.:)

Dale F. Saran
03-30-2009, 09:52 PM
"It presumes to be able to value a Level I for every person out there who might want to go and to peg their value only to Affiliation or future pecuniary gain."

Not every person...but some.

"I had no interest in being a trainer or affiliate when I went."

That's awesome, but dont scoff at someone who is considering ways to make a living doing what he loves. I dont know of any Affiliates (aside from the MIL non-profits) who are pro-bono and out to fail.

Either way, thanks for the input and information.:)

Mike, I didn't scoff at all. I was replying to your assertion that appeared, to me, to scoff at any value assigned to a Level I beyond to affiliate and make money. I'll repeat what I said in brief - I disagree with your statement. I do not think it was "fair" to characterize the level I as having little value other than being a vehicle to become an affiliate.

And you miss the inference in my post. I didn't have any interst in being an affil when I went - but I later became one and was for almost a year before coming on to help CF HQ. I continue to train folks gratis now when I'm working out if they want some help.

So, I get being a trainer and making money at it. But I would still disagree with your statement.

We just see the value in the Level I differently.:shrug:

Damon Stewart
03-30-2009, 10:26 PM
Would it be ok to start a website similar to Crossfit but never mention Crossfit and have this as my exercise mission?

Our workouts follow a pattern based on this principle: All workouts are highly intense; multi-joint focused and based on the principle of change.

Register today or login to gain full access...

Or how about if I didn't mention Crossfit but my nutrition recommendation was this?

Eat lean meats, vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. Keep intake to levels that will support exercise but not body fat.

Mike Wright
03-30-2009, 10:27 PM
No worries, I understand where you are coming from and I see the value there. Not looking to start an argument, I just made some assumptions about what I could do w/Level 1 under my belt that werent accurate. Not doing my homework bit me in the end. Thanks again for all the info, Mike.:)

Fred Pimental
04-01-2009, 09:33 AM
Would it be ok to start a website similar to CrossFit but never mention CrossFit and have this as my exercise mission?

Our workouts follow a pattern based on this principle: All workouts are highly intense; multi-joint focused and based on the principle of change.

Register today or login to gain full access...

Or how about if I didn't mention CrossFit but my nutrition recommendation was this?

Eat lean meats, vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. Keep intake to levels that will support exercise but not body fat.


I have the same questions.

Katherine Derbyshire
04-01-2009, 10:51 AM
Would it be ok to start a website similar to CrossFit but never mention CrossFit and have this as my exercise mission?

Our workouts follow a pattern based on this principle: All workouts are highly intense; multi-joint focused and based on the principle of change.

Register today or login to gain full access...

Or how about if I didn't mention CrossFit but my nutrition recommendation was this?

Eat lean meats, vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. Keep intake to levels that will support exercise but not body fat.

Ethically, no. You're doing Crossfit. Give credit where credit is due.

Legally, there might not be much Crossfit HQ could do about it. Neither the training concepts nor the nutrition recommendations are unique to CF. There might be a copyright issue if you used CF WOD programming, but it would be easy enough to put together your own workouts from the published templates.

That's the risk of going open source. Without strong intellectual property protections Crossfit HQ is essentially betting that their programming, their hands-on coaching (via the certs), and their support infrastructure are better than most trainers can provide on their own.

Seems to be working so far.

Katherine

Cody Limbaugh
04-01-2009, 11:50 AM
Dale-
Thanks so much for your input on this thread. I'm looking forward to seeing the new guidelines for affiliation and updated FAQ on these matters. 2 more questions though:

I am L1 Certified and want to affiliate as soon as I can afford to!

1- If I'm running a workout of the day blog now, should I avoid using named workouts too? "Fran" etc..?

2- When you mentioned resume' I assume you mean for employment only? I have a page on my site that I describe my experience and certs. I have CrossFit listed along with others I have obtained. Should I remove this?

On one other note: I'm glad that affiliation is respected as a process because I don't want every shmo out there becoming an affiliate BUT- as I work toward the goal of affiliating it seems that the goal keeps getting further away from me. Increase in affiliation fees and now new requirements? I hope that the new affiliation process and requirements are clearly defined and able to be viewed publicly as it currently seems to be a bit of an enigma.

Thanks again for your help on here!

Fred Pimental
04-01-2009, 12:25 PM
Thanks.

I am in the same boat. I am starting small only training a few people but not big enough to be an affiliate yet (especially with the hike in price). I am going to be setting a blog type site with work outs etc...but will leave any mention of Crossfit under my credentials as Level 1.

Steve Loeding
04-01-2009, 02:31 PM
I agree with you guys - affiliate fees at $2000 (makes it difficult for people starting out) it's expensive and that limits those who start out in a garage gym with a couple of people. add on to insurance, rent, etc = you don't want more barriers in your way

Cody Limbaugh
04-01-2009, 02:42 PM
Ya- I'm not trying to complain. I think all the pricing is more than fair and worth every penny.

It's just that I feel like I can hardly keep up with the evolution of CF. I would like the opportunity to set some personal/business goals and a time-line for affiliation but the rules keep changing and it feels like 2 steps forward/1 back for me.

It's all good- just would like some clarification on my above concerns.

Eric Lester
04-04-2009, 09:20 AM
1- If I'm running a workout of the day blog now, should I avoid using named workouts too? "Fran" etc..?

Seems like I echoed this question on another thread but can no longer find it. Enquiring minds want to know :D

George Vorrias
01-23-2010, 07:32 PM
I got my level 1 cert in January and have since been doing free training for the ROTC program at a nearby college and for a friend to hone my training skills. Another friend went to a cert last weekend and said he was told at the cert that you can train individuals using the CrossFit name on a small level without affiliating.

I wanted to get some clarification before I go somewhere I should not go ethically. I work most of the day in sales, but have the flexibility to do some training in the morning if I can gather some clients.

So, to the real question. Can I train and call it Crossfit without Affiliating? Where is the line that I am required to affiliate while working out of my garage? I couldn't find this specifically addressed in a search so I wanted to get clarification. It is tough getting started, and doing some training on a small level would give me some insight as to if I would really be able to start a gym and run an affiliate. Thanks in advance. I love CrossFit and I love training, it would be cool to get paid a little for my time and effort. I just want to do it the right way.


1. get knowledge, cert 1,2 & elements (pay for it).

Brian Strump
01-24-2010, 04:57 AM
I agree with you guys - affiliate fees at $2000 (makes it difficult for people starting out) it's expensive and that limits those who start out in a garage gym with a couple of people. add on to insurance, rent, etc = you don't want more barriers in your way

Find a business you can fun for a lower overhead. After your search yields about nothing...You'll be thankful you found CrossFit. Good luck.

Helen Lawson
02-01-2010, 06:09 AM
I know this is an old thread (started long ago) but i have 2 new questions. I attended the level 1 but am not affiliated (yet). Questions:

1 - Can I call it "Workout of the Day (WOD)" on my website and advertisements or is that phrase legally reserved for affiliates only?

2 - In advertisements (Craigslist, flyers, etc...) can i say "classes lead by a Crossfit certified Coach"?

Thanks.

Dan MacDougald
02-02-2010, 03:04 AM
I know this is an old thread (started long ago) but i have 2 new questions. I attended the level 1 but am not affiliated (yet). Questions:

1 - Can I call it "Workout of the Day (WOD)" on my website and advertisements or is that phrase legally reserved for affiliates only?

2 - In advertisements (Craigslist, flyers, etc...) can i say "classes lead by a Crossfit certified Coach"?

Helen,

The answers are: (1) Yes, you can. "Workout of the Day" and "WOD" are not copyrighted or trademarked. (2) No. First, you are not a "CrossFit certified Coach." You are a "CrossFit certified Trainer" The "Coach" designation is reserved for extraordinary contributions to CrossFit and has rarely been awarded. Second, if you ask yourself the purpose of saying, "lead [sic] by a CrossFit certified Coach," you have the answer from Dale Saran's posts. You cannot use word "CrossFit" as a means of marketing fitness services without entering into a licensing agreement with CrossFit, Inc.

Helen Lawson
02-02-2010, 05:39 AM
Helen,

The answers are: (1) Yes, you can. "Workout of the Day" and "WOD" are not copyrighted or trademarked. (2) No. First, you are not a "CrossFit certified Coach." You are a "CrossFit certified Trainer" The "Coach" designation is reserved for extraordinary contributions to CrossFit and has rarely been awarded. Second, if you ask yourself the purpose of saying, "lead [sic] by a CrossFit certified Coach," you have the answer from Dale Saran's posts. You cannot use word "CrossFit" as a means of marketing fitness services without entering into a licensing agreement with CrossFit, Inc.


Thanks Dan. Those were the answers i was expecting...but just wanted to make sure i was doing everything right.

Helen

Mark Griffith
02-02-2010, 09:51 AM
Actually "Coach" is not copyrighted or trademarked either.
We call ourselves Coaches at our affiliate, but not "CrossFit Certified Coaches"

Helen Lawson
02-04-2010, 05:38 AM
OK...another question...Even though I am not affiliated can i link my website to the CrossFit main site, exercise descriptions & Free "What is Fitness" CrossFit Journal? If so...any special wording i should use to ensure i'm doing so without breaking the rules?

thanks in advance.

Helen