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View Full Version : Coach my Deadlifts please


Cory Osborne
10-01-2007, 08:04 PM
This was during the last 9 reps of 'Diane', I'm pretty tired but I think it's good because it exploits my weaknesses. I know there's probably a lot wrong here, I haven't dead lifted until 2 months ago. With an athletic background, shows you how much the fancy machines are taking over... Thanks in advance!

w/f safe:
"http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4UJH_4Kiic"

Brandon Oto
10-02-2007, 12:39 AM
Arch That Back

Gorm Laursen
10-02-2007, 01:06 AM
You'll want to look more upwards and poke that arse more. The back's too arched.

You're looking almost straight ahead, try to look towards the sky. The direction of your head controls the direction of your body and the direction of you eyes controls the direction of your head. So look were you're going.

Look at this fine piece of photoshop art I've attached.

There's two sets of arrows: pink and blue. The pink arrows shows your sight direction now and the way your body 'thinks' it should lift. The blue arrows show the general direction your body should take (slightly emphasized). And the best way to get that movement, is simply by poking the arse and looking towards the ceiling.

Cory Osborne
10-02-2007, 09:54 PM
Thanks Brandon, Gorm,

I didn't know why my back kept convexing rather than concaving. Thanks to that masterpiece Gorm, it makes sense.

After these dead lifts my lower back kills me, so is that mostly on-a-count of the form? Or just weak erectors?

I'll work on what I have to go on now, hopefully it gets corrected. Next time we do dead lifts ill post another for comparison. Thanks again, you guys are awesome.

Peter Dell'Orto
10-03-2007, 01:30 AM
That rounded back is probably the reason for the lower-back pain/soreness. When you round your back, your spinal erectors do a lot more of the work. If you're arching your back, the soreness (if any) is much more evenly distributed.

In my experience, anyway.

Brandon Oto
10-03-2007, 03:52 AM
After these dead lifts my lower back kills me, so is that mostly on-a-count of the form? Or just weak erectors?


Both? Weak erectors may be the reason for the form. (But it also may be partly flexibility or just knowing what to do.)

Leonid Soubbotine
10-03-2007, 05:52 AM
Improve your mobility at the hips - this also will give you more awareness about "hinging" at your hips, not lumbar spine.

Ben Moskowitz
10-03-2007, 06:58 PM
You'll want to look more upwards and poke that arse more. The back's too arched.

You're looking almost straight ahead, try to look towards the sky. The direction of your head controls the direction of your body and the direction of you eyes controls the direction of your head. So look were you're going.

Look at this fine piece of photoshop art I've attached.

There's two sets of arrows: pink and blue. The pink arrows shows your sight direction now and the way your body 'thinks' it should lift. The blue arrows show the general direction your body should take (slightly emphasized). And the best way to get that movement, is simply by poking the arse and looking towards the ceiling.

I don't think this is right. Rippetoe recommends looking at a spot on the ground 10-15 ft. in front or thereabouts. Hyperextending the upper spine doesn't improve safety or efficacy.
don't look up, get your chest up.

Gorm Laursen
10-03-2007, 11:54 PM
Well, it's simply an easy trick to getting you to not round the back. I used it with great succes, when my DL began to go above BW and my form started to deterioate a bit. It's not a question of hyperextending, it's merely a trick to get right posture ...

Cory Osborne
10-04-2007, 11:17 AM
Both? Weak erectors may be the reason for the form. (But it also may be partly flexibility or just knowing what to do.)
Yeah, I think your right about that. I notice when try to go down in the correct position, my back just curls around on its own when i'm conciously trying not to let it. Noticed my hammies aren't that flexible when I stretch too, so I think you hit it right on the button.

Solomon Sands
10-04-2007, 11:17 AM
You are not sinkin low enough into the start of your lift. That is a sign of tight hammy's.

Look, you need to bring your chest up and shoulders back. That will automatically pull your hands farther from the bar. To get your hands back on the bar, you have to drop your hips. To drop your hips, you need to stretch your hams. And glutes.

Also, drop the poundage until your form is correct OR you can elevate the weight from the ground (like on a platform) so you don't have to start so close to the ground. It won't correct your form, but can help you on heavy days w/o risking injury to your back.

Cory Osborne
10-04-2007, 11:22 AM
Improve your mobility at the hips - this also will give you more awareness about "hinging" at your hips, not lumbar spine.
Apologies, I feel a little lost here. When you said mobility are you talking about flexibility and strength? If so, could you possible give me some pointers in correcting these areas, please. Thanks!

Cory Osborne
10-07-2007, 08:28 PM
Thanks Soloman, sounds solid and Ben for pointing out what Coach says keeping me injury free. I'm working on it, and it's getting better! I appreciate the help.

Aaron Shaffer
10-24-2007, 05:56 AM
Ben is right - Coach Rip says look down 10-15 feet in front of you and to never look up at the ceiling because it places the spine in unsafe positions.

What the other guys say here is good. Work on hinging at the hips and never bend the back forwards like that. It looks like the weight might be too heavy if you can't hold correct back position.

Kyle Sattgast
10-24-2007, 01:39 PM
I'm with everyone else. Hinge at the hips, don't round that back. I see people saying to arch the back, I personally don't think an arch is to important-keep it straight and don't round it.

Brian De Mio
10-24-2007, 02:57 PM
Cory is that the gym on the air station? It kinda looks like the same one when I was there in 1991. Small as can be. Somebody told me they had improved it. heh doesn't look much bigger.

John Schneider
10-24-2007, 03:31 PM
Well, it's simply an easy trick to getting you to not round the back. I used it with great succes, when my DL began to go above BW and my form started to deterioate a bit. It's not a question of hyperextending, it's merely a trick to get right posture ...

It is a "trick", but not the best one. It creates a lot of sheering forces on the spine. A better coaching cue is "Big chest, shoulders back." Also, "butt back, weight on heals, stomache tight" is a good cue. I can't watch the video from work now that youtube is blocked but I hope those cues help.

Ryan G Sanders
10-25-2007, 06:40 PM
You'll want to look more upwards and poke that arse more. The back's too arched.

You're looking almost straight ahead, try to look towards the sky. The direction of your head controls the direction of your body and the direction of you eyes controls the direction of your head. So look were you're going.

Look at this fine piece of photoshop art I've attached.

There's two sets of arrows: pink and blue. The pink arrows shows your sight direction now and the way your body 'thinks' it should lift. The blue arrows show the general direction your body should take (slightly emphasized). And the best way to get that movement, is simply by poking the arse and looking towards the ceiling.

I had a PR pull of 610 in a USAPL meet in the 220 lb class (100 kilo)...and I was never built to pull. The form I was taught, and believe to be correct, will have you looking forward, slightly above parallel, chest out and bar directly UNDER your shoulders...always maintaining the lumbar curve.

When I coached HS powerlifting, I used to try to get the kids to envision driving their heels through the floor, rather than lifting the bar--this forces a correct start to the lift with the hips, rather than the back.

This is the guy I learned from...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JE47Gy2hXRU

You'll notice Coach Frank drives the hips forward to initiate the lift...the form gets a little sloppy at the end...but, then again, this was in a meet and all bets were off on a third attempt...

Hope this helps a bit!

Jason M Struck
10-26-2007, 12:24 PM
i find that 'superman' holds and some other erector exercises get newbs to figure out what I mean when I say 'arch'.